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I have a table that has 20 integer columns and 1 text column named 'foo'

If I run query:

SELECT * from table_name where foo is NULL

I get error:

ERROR:  column "foo" does not exist

I have checked myself that his column indeed exists. If I do something like:

SELECT * from table)name where count is NULL

The resulting output shows 'foo' as one of the columns.... I am guessing I have to do something special in the query because foo is a text column...

Thanks for the help (POSTGRESQL 8.3)

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1  
What do you see if you go into psql and type "\d table_name"? –  Paul Tomblin Apr 17 '12 at 23:48
2  
How did you create the column? Was it created as "Foo" or "Foo " or similar? –  mu is too short Apr 17 '12 at 23:51
    
@PaulTomblin I am accessing using phpPGmyadmin, don't have access to cmd line. –  nulltorpedo Apr 17 '12 at 23:52
1  
@muistooshort It is "foo". I checked for trailing spaces –  nulltorpedo Apr 17 '12 at 23:57
1  
What SQL was used to create the table? You should be able to dig that out of phpPGmyadmin. –  mu is too short Apr 18 '12 at 0:15
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You accidentally created the column name with a trailing space and presumably phpPGadmin created the column name with double quotes around it:

create table your_table (
    "foo " -- ...
)

That would give you a column that looked like it was called foo everywhere but you'd have to double quote it and include the space whenever you use it:

select ... from your_table where "foo " is not null

The best practice is to use lower case unquoted column names with PostgreSQL. There should be a setting in phpPGadmin somewhere that will tell it to not quote identifiers (such as table and column names) but alas, I don't use phpPGadmin so I don't where that setting is (or even if it exists).

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If for some reason you have created a mixed-case or upper-case column name, you need to quote it, or get this error:

test=> create table moo("FOO" int);
CREATE TABLE
test=> select * from moo;
 FOO 
-----
(0 rows)
test=> select "foo" from moo;
ERROR:  column "foo" does not exist
LINE 1: select "foo" from moo;
               ^
test=> _

Note how the error message gives the case in quotes.

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PostreSQL apparently converts column names to lower case in a sql query - I've seen issues where mixed case column names will give that error. You can fix it by putting the column name in quotation marks:

SELECT * FROM table_name where "Foo" IS NULL
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As others suggested in comments, this is probably a matter of upper-case versus lower-case, or some whitespace in the column name. (I'm using an answer so I can format some code samples.) To see what the column names really are, try running this query:

SELECT '"' || attname || '"', char_length(attname)
  FROM pg_attribute
  WHERE attrelid = 'table_name'::regclass AND attnum > 0
  ORDER BY attnum;

You should probably also check your PostgreSQL server log if you can, to see what it reports for the statement.

If you quote an identifier, everything in quotes is part of the identifier, including upper-case characters, line endings, spaces, and special characters. The only exception is that two adjacent quote characters are taken as an escape sequence for one quote character. When an identifier is not in quotes, all letters are folded to lower-case. Here's an example of normal behavior:

test=# create table t (alpha text, Bravo text, "Charlie" text, "delta " text);
CREATE TABLE
test=# select * from t where Alpha is null;
 alpha | bravo | Charlie | delta  
-------+-------+---------+--------
(0 rows)

test=# select * from t where bravo is null;
 alpha | bravo | Charlie | delta  
-------+-------+---------+--------
(0 rows)

test=# select * from t where Charlie is null;
ERROR:  column "charlie" does not exist
LINE 1: select * from t where Charlie is null;
                              ^
test=# select * from t where delta is null;
ERROR:  column "delta" does not exist
LINE 1: select * from t where delta is null;
                              ^

The query I showed at the top yields this:

 ?column?  | char_length 
-----------+-------------
 "alpha"   |           5
 "bravo"   |           5
 "Charlie" |           7
 "delta "  |           6
(4 rows)
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