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I am using MVVM (prism) to develop wpf application.

One of my model class "StandardContact" has its properties directly bound to the view. I use IDataErrorInfo to track and notify whether the model has any error. If there are any errors in Model, I disable the "Save" Command.

As the user enters some data, I use the StandardContact.PropertyChanged handler to see if "Save" command can execute (i.e if the model data entered by user is valid). The problem is that the StandardContact.PropertyChanged handler is called before the IDataErrorInfo's validation code, so CanExecute for "Save" command does not correctly reflect whether the command can be executed or not. What I am looking for is that, before the CanExecute executes, the IDataErrorInfo validation should run so that the CanExecute will query on the latest data in model and decide whether it is enabled or not. Here is the sample code that I am using

Model:

public class StandardContact :EntityBase, IDataErrorInfo
{
    public virtual string Name 
    {
        get { return _name; }
        set { SetField(ref _name, value, () => Name); }
    }

    //...
    //Validators
    public string this[string propertyName] 
    {
        get 
        {
            string error = null;
        //....
    }

ViewModel

public class SContactEditViewModel : NotificationObject, INavigationAware 
{
    //....
        StandardContact.PropertyChanged += 
            new PropertyChangedEventHandler(StandardContact_PropertyChanged);

    void StandardContact_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e) 
    {
        //Requery if command can execute
        SaveNewCommand.RaiseCanExecuteChanged(); 
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
When your view is directly bound to your model you are violating the MVVM pattern. You should always have a view model between model and view that duplicates the model's properties. –  PVitt Apr 18 '12 at 9:20
    
Well in theory you are correct. But if I am just exposing the model properties directly to view without much conditioning, I don't think there is really any need to duplicate the model's properties in the ViewModel. Although, this is my first MVVM project, I have searched the same topic over web and found quite contradicting conclusions. Quite a few people found it pragmatic to expose their model directly to view. When I started learning this pattern, most of the explanations focussed on decoupling View from ViewModel and didn't stressed much on the Model exposure. –  Jatin Apr 18 '12 at 9:44
    
It's not only in theory. To describe why it is important is a very tough job, and most people using MVVM haven't understood the importance of decoupling the VM and M. So I just can advice you to decouple it (at best using a framework that supports you) and start learning about MVVM in depth. Don't get me wrong, but from my point of view most people that state to know about MVVM do not. –  PVitt Apr 18 '12 at 9:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I just inspected our priprietary MVVM library. Inside the ViewModels indexer (in your case this is the Models indexer) the requested Property is validated:

public string this[string propertyName]
{
    get
    {
        string result = null;

        if (CanDataErrorValidated(propertyName))
        {
            int errorCount = CurrentValidationAdapter.ErrorCount();
            result = ValidateProperty(propertyName, GetValidateValue(propertyName));

            // if the error flag has been changed after validation
            if (errorCount != CurrentValidationAdapter.ErrorCount())
            {
                RaisePropertyChanged(PropHasError);
                RaisePropertyChanged(PropError);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            RaisePropertyChanged(PropHasError);
            RaisePropertyChanged(PropError);
        }

        return result;
    }
}

So the solution of your problem seems to validate the requested property on the fly.

share|improve this answer
    
this was what I was exactly looking for. Thanks a lot. –  Jatin Apr 18 '12 at 12:11
    
@Nirvan: This code snippet is part of our ValueViewModel. This class is used to add logic to the view model's properties that hold the duplicated values of the model. Give it a try and rethink your view-model coupling ;) –  PVitt Apr 18 '12 at 12:22
    
Yes, I already see my model getting cluttered with code that's not supposed to be there in first place. I will surely think about it. Meanwhile, this question is answered, as I solved by implementing the above logic in my model. Thanks again –  Jatin Apr 18 '12 at 12:25

I don't use prism, but if it exposes some sort of IsValid method or property you can use that to trigger your error checking. And if it doesn't you can write your own.

The basic idea without prism is to have to leverage IDataErrorInfo.Error by doing

bool IsValid{ get{return string.IsNullOrEmpty(Error) }  // trigger validation

Then inside your Save.CanExecute method

return IsValid;    // trigger validation on demand

HTH,
Berryl

share|improve this answer
    
I am already using Error property of IDataErrorInfo in the CanExecute. The only thing that matters is that CanExecute is triggered before the Model Property changes, as a result of which I am getting Model error, even if the User has entered valid data. Here is the sequence (1.) User Enters Valid Data - (2.)Property Changed for Model called - (3.)CanExecute checks for valid Model - (4.)Model updates itself with new Data entered by User. As you can see, ideally I would have wanted step no. 4 to execute before step no. 3. That way, the CanExecute will get to work on latest model data. –  Jatin Apr 18 '12 at 5:06
    
@Nirvan: Is it correct that your model raises PropertyChanged before it has changed the property? –  PVitt Apr 18 '12 at 9:25
    
@PVitt yes you are correct –  Jatin Apr 18 '12 at 9:32
    
@Nirvan: Raising an event that something has happend should never be done before it has happened. It is important to distinguish between PropertyChanging and PropertyChanged. –  PVitt Apr 18 '12 at 9:42
    
@PVitt, There is some confusion here. There are two events in play here. At property level whenever some property changes, I use NotifyPropertyChanged in the property's setter. This all happens in Model. My ViewModel exposes an Instance of Model. In the view Model, I have a class level PropertyChange Handler. For example if my model is "Product", then in ViewModule I have an instance of it say CurrentProduct. In my ViewMOdel I use CurrentProduct.PropertyChanged += SomeChangeHandler. This SomeChangeHandler fires before the Product setters. –  Jatin Apr 18 '12 at 9:50

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