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Writing an AVL Tree to hold generics for my data structures course; in my add() method, after actually inserting an element, I step back up through its ancestors checking their scores. For the first few additions it works, but (presumably at the point where balancing does need to be done), the loop back up the path fails to terminate. I've tried everything I can think of to make sure the root of the tree's parent isn't getting set to another node or anything like that. I'm calculating balance scores as right minus left, so positive means a tree is right-heavy and negative means left-heavy. Here's my add():

public void add(T e){
    if (e == null)
        return;
    if (root == null) {
        root = new TNode<T>(null, e);
        return;
    }
    boolean added = false;
    TNode<T> current = root;
    while (current != null && added != true) {  //insertion loop
        if (current.compareTo(e) == 0)
            return;
        else if (current.compareTo(e) < 0) {
            if (current.getRight() == null) {
                current.setRight(new TNode<T>(current, e));
                added = true;
            }
            else                
                current = current.getRight();
        }   
        else if (current.compareTo(e) > 0) {
            if (current.getLeft() == null) {
                current.setLeft(new TNode<T>(current, e));
                added = true;
            }
            else
                current = current.getLeft();
        }
    }
    if (useAVL == false)
        return;

    //balancing, checking up from added node to find where tree is unbalanced; currently loop does not terminate
    //current is now parent of inserted node
    while (current.hasParent()) {       
        if (current.getAvl() > 1) {
            if (current.getRight().getAvl() > 0)
                current = rotateLeft(current);
            else if (current.getRight().getAvl() < 0) {
                current.setRight(rotateRight(current.getRight()));
                current = rotateLeft(current);
            }
        }
        if (current.getAvl() < -1) {
            if (current.getLeft().getAvl() < 0)
                current = rotateRight(current);
            else if (current.getLeft().getAvl() > 0) {
                current.setLeft(rotateLeft(current.getLeft()));
                current = rotateRight(current);
            }
        }
        current = current.getParent();
    }
    root = current;
    root.setParent(null);
}

And here's the right rotation method:

private TNode<T> rotateRight(TNode<T> old) {
    TNode<T> oldRoot = old;
    TNode<T> newRoot = old.getLeft();
    TNode<T> rightChildNewRoot = newRoot.getRight();    //was right child of what will become root, becomes left child of old root
    newRoot.setRight(oldRoot);
    oldRoot.setParent(newRoot);
    oldRoot.setLeft(rightChildNewRoot);
    if (rightChildNewRoot != null)
        rightChildNewRoot.setParent(oldRoot);
    newRoot.setParent(oldRoot.getParent());
    return newRoot;
}
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1  
Have you tried stepping through your code in a debugger? –  ulmangt Apr 18 '12 at 1:02
    
Yes. From more time spent stepping through, it appears one of the balancing methods is visited first, then the infinite loop occurs, never balancing again, where before I had thought it was infinitely re-balancing. Still not sure why, though. –  dysfunction Apr 18 '12 at 1:20
    
I meant to add, at some point the value of current stops changing, but it still continues the loop. –  dysfunction Apr 18 '12 at 1:22
2  
Rather than changing the title to (Solved), please create an answer and mark it as correct. Or if you don't think it will be useful to anyone else, just delete the question. –  StriplingWarrior Apr 18 '12 at 2:37
1  
As @StriplingWarrior said, the proper way to do things at SO is either to post your solution as an answer (you can accept it as correct after a short delay), which lets others know you've got your answer and helps people who search here later, or delete your question. Marking it "Solved" with no info means it doesn't help others in the future. Please take a few minutes to read the FAQ to become more familiar with how SO works. Thanks! :) –  Ken White Apr 18 '12 at 2:41
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