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I have some code thats not working(which is a common occurrence for me), but because I am not getting an errors it just continues to run with bad data. The problem I think is it keeps telling me to wrap parts of my code in try/catch blocks(my tests are basic, I just output a message in the try area and if it gets outputted I assume all went well. All does not seem well in my code). I understand in production, putting a try/catch statement helps the code to continue to run but its making me troubleshooting difficult because I'm trying to troubleshoot that section of my code.

Is there a way around this so I can actually see when something fails within the try area?

Here's a sample of my code:

    try {
        ByteArrayInputStream baos_back = new ByteArrayInputStream(message);
        ObjectInputStream oos_back = new ObjectInputStream(baos_back);
        i = oos_back.readInt();
        d = oos_back.readDouble();
        list_of_ints = (int[]) oos_back.readObject();
        oos_back.reset();
        baos_back.reset();
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
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you can throw the exception to the calling function by adding a throws declaration to the method. –  twain249 Apr 18 '12 at 1:12
1  
I'd suggest running your code through a debugger and breaking on exceptions. –  birryree Apr 18 '12 at 1:14
    
Its not part of a method. its within my run() method(basically its opening a channel to a server, pulling data, and converting it). –  Error_404 Apr 18 '12 at 1:14
1  
Also, in the catch block, you can at least print the stacktrace (along with the value of any method parameters that may be of interest). That would help in debugging. –  Thilo Apr 18 '12 at 1:14
1  
@learningJava - if you just want to see if an exception is getting thrown at all, you can also do a blanket try { /* stuff */ } catch (Exception ex) { ex.printStackTrace(); }, which will catch all Exceptions, including runtime and checked exceptions. The only things it won't catch are non-Exception Throwables, which are Errors. –  birryree Apr 18 '12 at 1:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As I mentioned in my comment, you can catch all exceptions in Java with a blanket catch statement:

try {
    // code
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

This will catch every Exception thrown in the try block, and the only things it won't catch are Errors.

In practice, you will want to limit the types of exceptions you catch, and catch more specific exceptions, so you can exception chain as follows:

try {
    // code
} catch (IOException ioe) {
    // we expected this
    ioe.printStackTrace();
} catch (SomeOtherException soe) { // just an example...
    soe.printStackTrace();
} catch (Exception e) {
    // Did we expect this? Maybe not!
    e.printStackTrace();
}

The above also makes it known that you expect some types of exceptions to occur, and then a big blanket catch-all statement that might catch things you didn't expect.

You can also log exceptions to a file or something else, rather than output them to standard out as this code does right now. A basic logging utility is java.util.logging.


I still recommend learning to use a debugger though. Debuggers can do a lot of things like halt program execution whenever an exception is thrown, and allow you to inspect the values of variables and fields at any point in the program's execution. If you use Eclipse or Netbeans or IntelliJ or other IDEs, they have debuggers. If you use the command line, there is the jdb command-line java debugger.

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thanks so much. I will def. learn debuggers(I only use them for breakpoints right now so I can start my profiler to get a memory dump but I'll focus on their features in eclipse). Thanks for the great answer and programming advice. –  Error_404 Apr 18 '12 at 4:55
    
actually, you triggered a question in my mind...are the integrated debuggers okay or are there 3rd party ones that are better(I'm totally new so not really sure how to define 'better')? –  Error_404 Apr 18 '12 at 4:56
    
@learningJava - The debuggers that come with IntelliJ/Eclipse are all pretty good, I have never needed to use an external debugger like JSwat in my years of writing code for Java. Here's a tutorial on Debugging with Eclipse. One third party thing I have used was the Memory Analyzer Tool, to check a Java heap dump to see what caused a machine with 8 GB RAM to crash with OutOfMemoryError. –  birryree Apr 18 '12 at 13:41
    
Thanks Birryree, I'll read up on the link. I installed Memory Analyzer for eclipse but found it a bit hard to understand(since I was new to java and eclipse), so I got a program called yourkit, that I can pull heap dumps to check what's in memory(if the program crashes then a heap dump is taken automatically). –  Error_404 Apr 18 '12 at 14:21
    
@learningJava Yourkit is very nice too - Eclipse MAT takes some getting used to, it was just the first thing I found which wasn't jhat, so I used it. I rarely have to use it, but it's nice to know about. –  birryree Apr 18 '12 at 14:32

Are you trying to get your program to blow up when this error occurs? If so, you should be able to wrap your IOException in a RuntimeException and throw that instead. They're unchecked, so you don't need to declare them and it should kill your program just fine.

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yes, I do want it to blow up when an error occurs. I'l check out your link, looks promising.. –  Error_404 Apr 18 '12 at 1:18

If you want your code to throw the appropriate exception, I'd suggest not using try-catch blocks at all. Try-catch is used to handle exceptions as they arise and then keep running the program, but it sounds like you don't want to handle them at all.

If you do want to use try-catch blocks you could always manually throw a RuntimeException at the end of the catch block. Something like:

throw new IOException();
try {
    // Some code...
} catch(Exception e) {
    // Error handling code...
    throw new RuntimeException(e.getMessage());
}
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I suggest editing your code generation template to do this

catch ( $ExceptionClass e )
{
  // TODO: Autogenerated catch block
  e.printStackTrace();
  throw new RuntimeExcepton( e );
}

This way you have a TODO reminder, a barf on stdout, and are ensured that your program will blow up if you do not provide correct exception handler.

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