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^.*(?=.*[0-9]).*$

I saw this posted in someone's code. Is this a valid regex? I know the ? is supposed to make the items before it optional like abc? makes c optional. But ? is at the start of a capturing bracket. What does that mean?

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I find the documentation for PCRE on php.net (php.net/manual/en/reference.pcre.pattern.syntax.php) to be a decent reference on teaching the many features available with regular expressions. It covers lookaheads, lookbehinds, etc... The ? in regular expressions has many different uses! –  Eli Sand Apr 18 '12 at 1:36
    
Oh I see, are these PHP specific? Or general regex syntax? –  Jonas Apr 18 '12 at 1:38
    
They're general. Certain implementations of regular expressions may not support all features, but the syntax is quite standard. The main difference is whether POSIX or PCRE regular expressions are implemented. POSIX is usually found in *nix command line/shell systems mostly, whereas PCRE is what came from Perl and is more feature-full and used more often. –  Eli Sand Apr 18 '12 at 1:42
    
Hmm I'm still trying to understand how this operator works exactly. I have sample string abc=dfg9abc and it works with regex .*(.*[0-9]).* or .*(=.*[0-9]).* but how can I modify the string to work with .*(?=.*[0-9]).*? –  Jonas Apr 18 '12 at 1:44
    
@Jonas It sure works with that too (without any modification). Have a look : regexr.com?30m54 –  Dr.Kameleon Apr 18 '12 at 1:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

? alone means : OPTIONALLY match what was before.

However, (? .. ) is used for assertions...

In your case, (?= is a look-ahead assertion, meaning : match if ONLY (what's in the brackets) follows.

Reference


(?: ... )

Non-capturing parentheses. Groups the included pattern, but does not provide capturing of matching text. Somewhat more efficient than capturing parentheses.

(?> ... )

Atomic-match parentheses. First match of the parenthesized subexpression is the only one tried; if it does not lead to an overall pattern match, back up the search for a match to a position before the "(?>"

(?# ... )

Free-format comment (?# comment ).

(?= ... )

Look-ahead assertion. True if the parenthesized pattern matches at the current input position, but does not advance the input position.

(?! ... )

Negative look-ahead assertion. True if the parenthesized pattern does not match at the current input position. Does not advance the input position.

(?<= ... )

Look-behind assertion. True if the parenthesized pattern matches text preceding the current input position, with the last character of the match being the input character just before the current position. Does not alter the input position. The length of possible strings matched by the look-behind pattern must not be unbounded (no * or + operators.)

(?<! ... )

Negative Look-behind assertion. True if the parenthesized pattern does not match text preceding the current input position, with the last character of the match being the input character just before the current position. Does not alter the input position. The length of possible strings matched by the look-behind pattern must not be unbounded (no * or + operators.)

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So you mean ?= together is a operator? I thought it was searching for a = equals. Can you give an exmaple of how (.*[0-9]) would be different? –  Jonas Apr 18 '12 at 1:36
    
@EliSand Well, this one is quite a good resource as well... Good to have pointed that out! ;-) –  Dr.Kameleon Apr 18 '12 at 1:36
    
@Jonas in this very particular example, I doubt it could make ANY difference. But I'll give you an example : check out this (regexr.com?30m4u) (without look-ahead assertion) and this (regexr.com?30m51)... And you'll see the difference... ;-) –  Dr.Kameleon Apr 18 '12 at 1:44
    
Sorry, moved my comment to poster since it made more sense there than here. Aside from assertions though, the neatest thing I like about ? is being able to do something like .*? to toggle greediness. –  Eli Sand Apr 18 '12 at 1:45
1  
@Jonas - an assertion basically makes sure that what you're looking for exists (ahead or behind), but it doesn't "consume" the match, meaning that when the regex parser moves to the next part of the pattern, it continues searching from where it was right when it hit the assertion. When you get the hang of it, assertions are very powerful. –  Eli Sand Apr 18 '12 at 1:48

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