Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to implement the pattern matching in the form

(a+b)(c-or*or/d).............. in any number of times.

I use the following pattern but it is not working recursively. It is just reading the first group.

Pattern pattern;
String regex="(([0-9]*)([+,-,/,*])([0-9]*)*)";
pattern=Pattern.compile(regex);
Matcher match = pattern.matcher(userInput);
share|improve this question
    
in which context are you using this. Can give a sample text to be tested with regex? –  Nick Apr 18 '12 at 3:45
1  
ok 15-9*12/5+9*4 i need to parse this as a user input and calculate this expression –  Rohit Haritash Apr 18 '12 at 3:50
    
calculate or check? regex is used for matching, checking not calculations. –  Nick Apr 18 '12 at 4:03
1  
i first need to check . For calculation i will use stack implementaton. I need to check if the input is valid. –  Rohit Haritash Apr 18 '12 at 4:07
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The regular expression you need to match that sort of sequence is this:

\s*-?\d+(?:\s*[-+/*]\s*-?\d+)+\s*

Let's break that down to it's component parts!

\s*            # Optional space
-?             # Optional minus sign
\d+            # Mandatory digits
(?:            # Start sub-regex
   \s*         #    Optional space
   [-+*/]      #    Mandatory single arithmetic operator
   \s*         #    Optional space
   -?          #    Optional minus sign
   \d+         #    Mandatory digits
)+             # End sub-regex: want one or more matches of it
\s*            # Optional space

(If you don't want to match spaces, remove all of those \s* and be aware that it will surprise users quite a lot.)

Now, when encoding the above as a String literal in Java (before compilation) you need to be careful to escape each of the \ characters in it:

String regex="\\s*-?\\d+(?:\\s*[-+/*]\\s*-?\\d+)+\\s*";

The other thing to be aware of is that this doesn't pull the regular expression apart into pieces for Java to parse and build an expression evaluation tree from; it just (with the rest of your code) matches the whole string or not. (Even putting in capturing parentheses wouldn't help a lot; when put inside some form of repetition, they only report the first place in the string where they matched.) The simplest way of doing that properly would be to use a parser generator like Antlr (it would also let you do things like parenthesized subexpressions, managing operator precedence, etc.)

share|improve this answer
    
Well thanks . Your regex just work fine for me. For parsing i m planning to use Stack implementation. thanks again. –  Rohit Haritash Apr 18 '12 at 6:55
    
@Rohit: "Stack implementation" is a lot like an LL parser, and that's what ANTLR is a tool for building. (With a name like that you'd think it would make LR parsers, but it doesn't; yet another missed opportunity for layers of cool names…) –  Donal Fellows Apr 18 '12 at 16:30
add comment

You will need an expression like this

[0-9]+-[0-9]+[\/*-+][0-9]+[\/*-+][0-9]+[\/*-+][0-9]+[\/*-+][0-9]+

You have to match the whole expression. You can not match part of the expression and do a second search because the pattern is repeated.

Note: In ruby \ is excape sequence of / character so you can omit it in C# or replace it with another characer.

Demo

share|improve this answer
add comment

The pattern

<!--
\((\d|[\+\-\/\\\*\^%!]+|(or|and) *)+\)

Options: ^ and $ match at line breaks

Match the character “(” literally «\(»
Match the regular expression below and capture its match into backreference number 1 «(\d|[\+\-\/\\\*\^%!]+|(or|and) *)+»
   Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «+»
   Note: You repeated the capturing group itself.  The group will capture only the last iteration.  Put a capturing group around the repeated group to capture all iterations. «+»
   Match either the regular expression below (attempting the next alternative only if this one fails) «\d»
      Match a single digit 0..9 «\d»
   Or match regular expression number 2 below (attempting the next alternative only if this one fails) «[\+\-\/\\\*\^%!]+»
      Match a single character present in the list below «[\+\-\/\\\*\^%!]+»
         Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «+»
         A + character «\+»
         A - character «\-»
         A / character «\/»
         A \ character «\\»
         A * character «\*»
         A ^ character «\^»
         One of the characters “%!” «%!»
   Or match regular expression number 3 below (the entire group fails if this one fails to match) «(or|and) *»
      Match the regular expression below and capture its match into backreference number 2 «(or|and)»
         Match either the regular expression below (attempting the next alternative only if this one fails) «or»
            Match the characters “or” literally «or»
         Or match regular expression number 2 below (the entire group fails if this one fails to match) «and»
            Match the characters “and” literally «and»
      Match the character “ ” literally « *»
         Between zero and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «*»
Match the character “)” literally «\)»
-->

The calculation algorithm
For parsing and processing input string you have to use a stack. Visit here for the concept.

Regards
Cylian

share|improve this answer
add comment

your expression doesnt escape special chars like +,(,)

try this

/\(\d+[\+|-|\/|\*]\d+)\G?/

\G is the whole pattern over again

? means the previous thing is optional

i changed your [0-9]* to \d+ which i think is more correct

i changed your , to |

share|improve this answer
    
Nah, \G doesn't work like your description. It matches boundary of last match - which means it asserts that position is where the last match ends. –  nhahtdh Jan 11 at 18:19
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.