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I am trying to implement method overloading in Python:

class A:
    def stackoverflow(self):    
        print 'first method'
    def stackoverflow(self, i):
        print 'second method', i

ob=A()
ob.stackoverflow(2)

but the output is second method 2; similarly:

class A:
    def stackoverflow(self):    
        print 'first method'
    def stackoverflow(self, i):
        print 'second method', i

ob=A()
ob.stackoverflow()

gives

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "my.py", line 9, in <module>
    ob.stackoverflow()
TypeError: stackoverflow() takes exactly 2 arguments (1 given)

How do I make this work?

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6  
In Python, think of methods as a special set of "attributes", and there can only be one "attribute" (and thus one method) of a given name for an object. The last method overwrites any previous methods. In Java, methods are not first-class citizens (they are not "attributes of objects"), but are rather invoked by "sending messages" that are are statically resolved based on closest type (which is where overloading comes in). –  user166390 Apr 18 '12 at 5:06
    
Also see stackoverflow.com/questions/733264/… –  agf Apr 18 '12 at 5:08
    
1  
Why is none of the answers to this question accepted yet? Just click on the outlied check mark on the left of your favourite answer... –  glglgl May 22 '12 at 9:34

6 Answers 6

It's method overloading not method overriding. And in Python, you do it all in one function:

class A:

    def stackoverflow(self, i='some_default_value'):    
        print 'only method'

ob=A()
ob.stackoverflow(2)
ob.stackoverflow()

You can't have two methods with the same name in Python -- and you don't need to.

See the Default Argument Values section of the Python tutorial. See "Least Astonishment" in Python: The Mutable Default Argument for a common mistake to avoid.

Edit: See PEP 433 for information about the new single dispatch generic functions in Python 3.4.

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2  
and you don't need to - IMHO sometime it would be very handy to have method overloading like e.g. in C++. Ok, it is not 'needed' in the sense that it can't be done using other constructs - but it would make some things easier and simpler. –  Andreas Florath Apr 18 '12 at 6:09
1  
@AndreasFlorath I disagree. Learn to love duck typing and write each method so it only does one thing, and there is no need for method overloading. –  agf Apr 18 '12 at 7:05
    
yeah, I need it, because I write in C++ and thus think in C++. understood now –  zinking Jun 21 '13 at 6:44
1  
+1 for making me read about the "common mistake to avoid" before I got caught –  cc. Sep 10 '13 at 11:27

You can't, never need to and don't really want to.

In Python, everything is an object. Classes are things, so they are objects. So are methods.

There is an object called A which is a class. It has an attribute called stackoverflow. It can only have one such attribute.

When you write def stackoverflow(...): ..., what happens is that you create an object which is the method, and assign it to the stackoverflow attribute of A. If you write two definitions, the second one replaces the first, the same way that assignment always behaves.

You furthermore do not want to write code that does the wilder of the sorts of things that overloading is sometimes used for. That's not how the language works. Instead of trying to define a separate function for each type of thing you could be given (which makes little sense since you don't specify types for function parameters anyway), stop worrying about what things are and start thinking about what they can do. You not only can't write a separate one to handle a tuple vs. a list, but also don't want or need to. All you do is take advantage of the fact that they are both, for example, iterable (i.e. you can write for element in container:). (The fact that they aren't directly related by inheritance is irrelevant.)

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In Python, you don't do things that way. When people do that in languages like Java, they generally want a default value (if they don't, they generally want a method with a different name). So, in Python, you can have default values.

class A(object):  # Remember the ``object`` bit when working in Python 2.x

    def stackoverflow(self, i=None):
        if i is None:
            print 'first form'
        else:
            print 'second form'

As you can see, you can use this to trigger separate behaviour rather than merely having a default value.

>>> ob = A()
>>> ob.stackoverflow()
first form
>>> ob.stackoverflow(2)
second form
share|improve this answer
    
Mostly None is useful when you want a mutable default value. Separate behavior should be in separate functions. –  agf Apr 18 '12 at 4:58
    
@agf: None can also be useful as a genuine default value. –  Chris Morgan Apr 18 '12 at 4:59
    
Yes, but I was referring to using it as a sentinel value, which is how you use it in your answer, and as I think my comment makes clear. –  agf Apr 18 '12 at 5:02

I think the word you're looking for is "overloading". There is no method overloading in python. You can however use default arguments, as follows.

def stackoverflow(self, i=None):
    if i != None:     
        print 'second method', i
    else:
        print 'first method'

When you pass it an argument it will follow the logic of the first condition and execute the first print statement. When you pass it no arguments, it will go into the else condition and execute the second print statement.

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In Python, you'd do this with a default argument.

class A:

    def stackoverflow(self, i=None):    
        if i == None:
            print 'first method'
        else:
            print 'second method',i
share|improve this answer

I write my answer in Python 3.2.1.

def overload(*functions):
    return lambda *args, **kwargs: functions[len(args)](*args, **kwargs)

How it works:

  1. overload takes any amount of callables and stores in in tuple functions, then returns lambda.
  2. The lambda takes any amount of arguments, then returns result of calling function stored in functions[number_of_unnamed_args_passed] called with argmuments passed to the lambda.

Usage:

class A:
    stackoverflow=overload(                    \
        None, \ #there is always a self argument, so this should never get called
        lambda self: print('First method'),      \
        lambda self, i: print('Second method', i) \
    )
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