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This seems like it should be extremely simple; however, after two hours of reading and trial-and-error without success, I'm admitting defeat and asking you guys!

I'm trying to use Mocha with Should.js to test some JavaScript functions, but I'm running into scoping issues. I've simplified it down to the most basic of test cases, but I cannot get it working.

I have a file named functions.js, which just contains the following:

function testFunction() {
    return 1;
}

And my tests.js (located in the same folder) contents:

require('./functions.js')

describe('tests', function(){
    describe('testFunction', function(){
        it('should return 1', function(){
            testFunction().should.equal(1);
        })
    })
})

This test fails with a ReferenceError: testFunction is not defined.

I can see why, because most of the examples I've found either attach objects and functions to the Node global object or export them using module.exports—but using either of these approaches means my function code would throw errors in a standard browser situation, where those objects don't exist.

So how can I access standalone functions which are declared in an separate script file from my tests, without using Node-specific syntax?

share|improve this question
    
Did you use exports.testFunction = testFunction in your functions.js ? –  drinchev Apr 18 '12 at 6:44
    
No, the full contents of functions.js are shown. Please read the question again—I specifically state that I don't want to use Node-specific syntax in the source file. –  Mark Bell Apr 18 '12 at 6:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted
require('./functions.js')

That doesn't do anything since you're not exporting anything. What you're expecting is that testFunction is globally available, essentially the same as

global.testFunction = function() {
    return 1;
}

You just can't bypass the export/globals mechanism. It's the way node has been designed. There is no implicit global shared context (like window on a browser). Every "global" variable in a module is trapped in it's context.

You should use module.exports. If you intend to share that file with a browser environments, there are ways to make it compatible. For a quick hack just do window.module = {}; jQuery.extend(window, module.exports) in the browser, or if (typeof exports !== 'undefined'){ exports.testFunction = testFunction } for node.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok that makes sense, thanks. So is Mocha not really intended for testing non-Node JS? It doesn't mention that anywhere in any of the docs or tutorials I've encountered. –  Mark Bell Apr 18 '12 at 9:30
    
You might want to try Qunit ( docs.jquery.com/Qunit ) for testing on the browser, or zombie.js (github.com/assaf/zombie) to simulate a browser environment in mocha. –  drinchev Apr 18 '12 at 11:28
    
@MarkBell Mocha should work fine in the browser, in which case you don't need the exports. –  Ricardo Tomasi Apr 18 '12 at 18:54

Thanks to the other answers here, I've got things working.

One thing which wasn't mentioned though—perhaps because it's common knowledge among Noders—was that you need to assign the result of the require call to a variable, so that you can refer to it when calling your exported functions from within the test suite.

Here's my complete code, for future reference:

functions.js:

function testFunction () {
    return 1;
}

// If we're running under Node, 
if(typeof exports !== 'undefined') {
    exports.testFunction = testFunction;
}

tests.js:

var myCode = require('./functions')

describe('tests', function(){
    describe('testFunction', function(){
        it('should return 1', function(){
            // Call the exported function from the module
            myCode.testFunction().should.equal(1);
        })
    })
})
share|improve this answer

If you want to make any module available through require you should use

module.exports

as you know ;)

there is a solution if you want to use a module in Node and in browser by doing this

function testFunction() { /* code */ }

if (typeof exports !== 'undefined') {
   exports.testFunction = testFunction
}

by doing this you will be able to use the file in browser and in node environment

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's useful. –  Mark Bell Apr 18 '12 at 9:31

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