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function foo(a) {
    if (/*some condition*/) {
        // perform task 1
        // perform task 3
    }
    else {
        // perform task 2
        // perform task 3
    }
}

I have a function whose structure is similar to the above. I want to abstract task 3 into a function, bar(), but I wish to limit the access of this function to only within the scope of foo(a).

To achieve what I want, is it right to change to the following?

function foo(a) {
    function bar() {
        // perform task 3
    }

    if (/*some condition*/) {
        // perform task 1
        bar();
    }
    else {
        // perform task 2
        bar();
    }
}

If the above is correct, does bar() get redefined every time foo(a) gets called? (worrying about waste of cpu resource here)

share|improve this question
    
Yes and yes.... –  hkf Apr 18 '12 at 7:00
1  
Test if it worth while yourself: jsperf.com I imagine it depends on task3. –  tomByrer Apr 18 '12 at 7:08
1  
@tomByer - +1 for suggesting the tool –  tamakisquare Apr 18 '12 at 7:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Yes, what you have there is right. Some notes:

  • bar is created on every call to the function, but:
    • On modern browsers this is a very fast process. (Some engines may well only compile the code for it once, and then reuse that code with a different context each time; Google's V8 engine [in Chrome and elsewhere] does that in most cases.)
    • And depending on what bar does, some engines may determine that they can "inline" it, eliminating the function call entirely. V8 does this, and I'm sure it's not the only engine that does. Naturally they can only do this if it doesn't change the behavior of the code.
  • The performance impact, if any, of having bar created every time will vary widely between JavaScript engines. If bar is trivial, it will vary from undetectable to fairly small. If you're not calling foo thousands of times in a row (for instance, from a mousemove handler), I wouldn't worry about it. Even if you are, I'd only worry about it if I saw a problem on slower engines. Here's a test case involving DOM operations, which suggests that there is an impact, but a trivial one (probably washed out by the DOM stuff). Here's a test case doing pure computation which shows a much higher impact, but frankly even, we're talking a difference of microseconds because even a 92% increase on something that takes microseconds to happen is still very, very fast. Until/unless you saw a real-world impact, it's not something to worry about.
  • bar will only be accessible from within the function, and it has access to all variables and arguments for that call to the function. This makes this a very handy pattern.
  • Note that because you've used a function declaration, it doesn't matter where you put the declaration (top, bottom, or middle — as long as it's at the top level of the function, not inside a flow control statement, which is a syntax error), it gets defined before the first line of step-wise code is run.
share|improve this answer
    
Thx for your answer. So are you saying that this is a negligible performance hit? (given that a copy of bar is created on every call of foo) –  tamakisquare Apr 18 '12 at 7:06
1  
@ahmoo: With JavaScript performance, the answer is almost always: It depends. :-) It depends on what engine will be running it and how frequently you'll be calling foo. If you're not calling foo thousands of times in a row (for instance, not in a mousemove handler), then I wouldn't be worried about it at all. And note that some engines (V8, for instance) will inline the code anyway, completely eliminating the function call, provided doing so doesn't change what's happening in a way that can be detected externally. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 18 '12 at 7:30
    
Thanks. You have got some great points. –  tamakisquare Apr 18 '12 at 7:36
    
@T.J.Crowder: can you comment on robrich's answer? does that solution prevent the recreation of bar() on each call? also, would using foo.prototype.bar to define the function help any? –  rkw Apr 18 '12 at 7:41
2  
@rkw: Creating the function once, like robrich's answer does, is a useful way to avoid the cost of creating it on every call. You lose the fact that bar has access to the variables and arguments for the call to foo (anything you want it to operate on, you have to pass it), which can complicate things a bit, but in a performance-critical situation where you've seen an actual problem, you might refactor like that to see if it solves the problem. No, using foo.prototype wouldn't really help (for one thing, bar would no longer be private). –  T.J. Crowder Apr 18 '12 at 7:53
var foo = (function () {
    var bar = function () {
        // perform task 3
    }
    return function (a) {

        if (/*some condition*/) {
            // perform task 1
            bar();
        }
        else {
            // perform task 2
            bar();
        }
    };
}());

The closure keeps the scope of bar() contained, returning the new function from the self-executing anonymous function sets more visible scope to foo(). The anonymous self-executing function is run exactly once, so there is only one bar() instance, and every execution of foo() will use it.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. I gotta look up closure then. Thanks. –  tamakisquare Apr 18 '12 at 7:39

This is what closures are for.

var foo = (function () {
  function bar() {
    // perform task 3
  };

  function innerfoo (a) { 
    if (/* some cond */ ) {
      // perform task 1
      bar();
    }
    else {
      // perform task 2
      bar();
    }
  }
  return innerfoo;
})();

Innerfoo (a closure) holds a reference to bar and only a reference to innerfoo is returned from an anonymous function which is called only once to create the closure.

Bar is not accessible from the outside this way.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. I have limited exposure to javascript, so closure is something new to me. You have marked a starting point for me to study closure, however. Thanks. –  tamakisquare Apr 18 '12 at 7:39

Yes, that works fine.

The inner function is not recreated each time you enter the outer function, but it's re-assigned.

If you test this code:

function test() {

    function demo() { alert('1'); }

    demo();
    demo = function() { alert('2'); };
    demo();

}

test();
test();

it will show 1, 2, 1, 2, not 1, 2, 2, 2.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Should the reassignment of demo() each time test() is called be a performance concern? Does it depend on the complexity of demo()? –  tamakisquare Apr 18 '12 at 7:14
1  
I made a performance test: jsperf.com/inner-function-vs-global-function The conclusion is that generally it's not a performance issue (as any code that you put in the functions will take a lot longer to run than creating the function itself), but if you would need that extra performance edge, you would have to write different code for different browsers. –  Guffa Apr 18 '12 at 7:28
    
Thx for spending the time to create the test and, as well as, sharing your points on performance. Much appreciated. –  tamakisquare Apr 18 '12 at 7:35
    
You've said "the inner function is not recreated each time" with great confidence. According to the spec, it is; whether an engine optimizes it depends on the engine. (I expect most will.) I'm intrigued to see that your test case and mine have such varying results: jsperf.com/cost-of-creating-inner-function Not that I think performance is an issue, though. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 18 '12 at 7:58
    
@T.J.Crowder: Well, yes, it's an implementation detail, but as modern Javascript engines compile the code, it won't recompile the function each time that it's assigned. The reason that the result of the performance tests differ, is because they test different things. My test compares global functions with local functions, while your test compares a local function with inlined code. Inlining the code will of course be faster than calling the function, it's a common optimisation technique. –  Guffa Apr 18 '12 at 8:04

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