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For an application I'm writing, I want to know which all processes are accessing a particular file and dump that information into a Log file. In the end one of the processes will be deleting this file, I would want to know the Process name for that too.

I can use the INotify library to monitor the file access, but it does not give me the process name which is accessing the file. This might be possible using the Auditctl package on linux as well but I can't use this option as well :-(

Actually it is a controlled environment for some reasons the end customer is ready to run a program but not ready to install new packages or make changes to the existing utilities.

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Not really about programming, more system administration. Voting to move to serverfault. –  Konerak Apr 18 '12 at 7:50
    
@konerak : It is not about system administration. If at all such a tool exists I want to write the code to do this. I mentioned I could not use tools like Auditctl. –  Geek Apr 18 '12 at 8:46
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aha, thanks. Can you tell us why you can't use that package? Avoids us suggesting other packages just to have them rejected by "I can't use that one either" without further explanation. –  Konerak Apr 18 '12 at 8:50
    
@konerak : Yes, I will add the information in the question itself :-) Actually it is a controlled environment for some reasons the end customer is ready to run a program but not ready to install new packages or make changes to the existing utilities. –  Geek Apr 18 '12 at 9:46
    
This should help –  tuxuday Apr 20 '12 at 12:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is not possible to reliably audit directly attached file access in Linux from userspace alone.

You could poll with lsof but you would risk not detecting accesses between polling. The purpose of the original dnotify module (obsoleted by inotify...) was to avoid having to incur the overhead of polling and to avoid loosing events. The audit system gives user identification at the time of file open.

If you can move the file to an NFS server, then you can use the NFS logging to record access to the file.

The customer could be correct about not installing new packages if this is a production server or if it is a development server that is about to go live. You should consider asking for authorization to set up auditing on the next development or testing server.

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