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I have just started to learn native javascript and I am trying to write a simple script which will display an alert window showing the text contained in each <p></p> element.

I am posting the code below. Please let me know what I am doing wrong

function show(){
  var x = document.getElementsByTagName('p');
  for(i=0;i<x.length;i++) {
    x[i].onclick=function(){
      alert(x[i].innerText);
    }
  }
}

show()

HTML is below:

<p>Blackberry</p>
<p>Strawberry</p>
<p>Raspberry</p>
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The first thing I notice is that you are leaking a global i which is a really bad thing. Use var i! The second thing I notice is that you do not mention what's actually happening (nothing, error, etc.) –  ThiefMaster Apr 18 '12 at 8:10
1  
The main problem is that i leaking into closure. –  kirilloid Apr 18 '12 at 8:12
1  
A bigger issue is show is likely called before the html is rendered –  mplungjan Apr 18 '12 at 8:16
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7 Answers

You're referencing an undefined object inside your callback, use:

alert(this.innerText || this.textContent);

instead...

edit: as pointed by @Sarfraz check for both innerText or textContent properties to ensure cross-browser compatibility.

PS Check also that show(); is called when the referenced DOM is loaded, and not before ;)

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3  
Notice that innerText is not cross browser. You should use innerHTML or innerText || textContent –  Sarfraz Apr 18 '12 at 8:22
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You just need to call show onload - for example

window.onload=show;

and change x[i] to this in the onclick - innerText is not supported by all browsers

I would do this DEMO

window.onload=function(){
  var x = document.getElementsByTagName('p');
  for(var i=0;i<x.length;i++) {
    x[i].onclick=function(){
      alert(this.innerHTML); // supported by more browsers than innerText
    }
  }
}
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Got it deleted my comment, checked it to be working fine, +1 :) –  Sarfraz Apr 18 '12 at 8:27
    
Thanks :) - updated my fiddle to use the innerText/textContent version –  mplungjan Apr 18 '12 at 8:31
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What you need is closure, otherwise any <p>, when clicked would not return anything as after iteration, i becomes x.length + 1, thus you are trying to access a non existant element when trying to do

x[i].innerText

Change your code to:

function show(){

   var x = document.getElementsByTagName('p');

   for(var i=0;i<x.length;i++) {
      x[i].onclick=function(i){
          return function() {
              alert(x[i].innerHTML); // alternatively you can also do this.innerHTML without closure, I just wanna introduce you to this concept
          }
       }(i);
   }


}

show()​

http://jsfiddle.net/3xYtF/11/

Or alternatively you can change x[i].innerText to this.innerText without having to use closure, but I see this as a good opportunity to introduce the concept of closure :). Also as pointed in another comment, .innerText isn't really crossbrowser, use innerText || textContent

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1  
OP said: I have just started to learn native javascript and I am trying to write a simple script - and we lay closure on him? –  mplungjan Apr 18 '12 at 8:32
    
Added a disclaimer.. :S, but I don't see any problem with introducing that early on. Thanks for your reminder though :) –  SiGanteng Apr 18 '12 at 8:33
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You need to ensure proper scoping of i inside your function.
You also need to use innerHTML instead of innerText.

function show() {
    var x = document.getElementsByTagName('p');
    for (var i = 0; i < x.length; i++) {
        (function(i) {
            x[i].onclick = function () {
                alert(x[i].innerHTML);
            }
        })(i);
    }
}

Since inside the onclick handler this is bound to the element, you can also avoid the issue with the closure and i alltogether:

function show() {
    var x = document.getElementsByTagName('p');
    for (var i = 0; i < x.length; i++) {
        x[i].onclick = function() {
            alert(this.innerHTML);
        }
    }
}
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what is the need for ()() in this case and why no this? –  mplungjan Apr 18 '12 at 8:21
    
The second solution does use this. In the first one the function call is necessary to avoid i being always the last value when the callback is actually called. –  ThiefMaster Apr 18 '12 at 8:31
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I guess you used the <script> tag in <head>. This will often fail because the DOM is not fully loaded.

<html>
 <head>
  <script>
  function show(){....}
  show(); // don't do this 
  </script>
 </head>
 <body>
  <p>Blackberry</p>
  <p>Strawberry</p>
  <p>Raspberry</p>
 </body>
</html>

It's better to use window.onload = show; or window.addEventListener('load',show);.

However, x[i] is a local variable. It isn't known outside of show, not even in your anonymous function. So you have to create a closure or use this.innerHTML.

So either use

function show(){
   var el = document.getElementsByTagName('p');
   for(var i = 0; i < el.lenght; ++i){
       el[i].onclick = function(e){
           alert(this.innerHTML);
       }
   }
}
window.onload = show;

or

function show(){
   var el = document.getElementsByTagName('p');
   for(var i = 0; i < el.lenght; ++i){
       el[i].onclick = (function(element){
           return function(e){
               alert(element.innerHTML);
           };
       })(el[i]);
   }
}
window.onload = show;

See also:

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Overdoing it much? the OP is a beginner. Why add parms to the onclick ()() ??? –  mplungjan Apr 18 '12 at 8:20
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The problem is, whenever the click handler is executed, it will always point to the last value of i. So, whatever paragraph element you click on you will always see 'Raspberry' according to your example.

The cleanest way to fix this, without using any complicated closure (which takes up memory), is to use 'this,' the context identifier, which will point to the element which is clicked on.

function show(){

var x = document.getElementsByTagName('p');

for(i=0;i<x.length;i++){

    x[i].onclick=function(){

        alert(this.innerText);

    }

}

}

show()

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I think show()is being run before the page has fully loaded. Try calling the function from the onloadevent instead and see if that helps.

<body onload='show();'>

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