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I noticed that the following code gives an error when you try to compile it:

let xx =
  seq {
    let! i = [ 1; 2 ]
    let! j = [ 3; 4 ]
    yield (i,j)
  }

The error this gives is "error FS0795: The use of 'let! x = coll' in sequence expressions is no longer permitted. Use 'for x in coll' instead." This message is of course clear and demonstrates how to fix it; the fixed code would be:

let xx =
  seq {
    for i in [ 1; 2 ] do
      for j in [ 3; 4 ] do
        yield (i,j)
  }

My question is not how to fix this however, but why the "let!" is not allowed in sequence expressions in the first place? I can see how the fact that let! iterates over an expression may come as a surprise to some, but that shouldn't be enough to disallow the construct. I also see how "for" is more powerful here, as the version with "let!" bakes in the scope of the iteration as "until the end of the sequence expression".

However, being able to iterate over a sequence without having to indent code was exactly what I was looking for (for traversing tree structures). I assume that to obtain this semantic I will have to make a new expression builder that acts mostly like the "seq" expression builder, but does allow "let!" for iteration, isn't it?


Added, based on Brian's comment below, providing the solution to my underlying problem:

I didn't realize the indentation in the for blocks isn't needed, and the second sample can be re-written as:

let xx =
  seq {
    for i in [ 1; 2 ] do
    for j in [ 3; 4 ] do
    yield (i,j)
  }

... which gets rid of the ever-increasing indentation when traversing a tree structure. The syntax even allows additional statements in between for statements without requiring extra indentation, as in:

let yy =
  seq {
    for i in [ 1; 2 ] do
    let i42 = i+42
    for j in [ 3; 4 ] do
    yield (i42,j)
  }

Now, if only I could figure out why I thought these statements would require indentation...

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4  
possible confusion with let! in async bindings - we have identical syntax doing completely different things? –  John Palmer Apr 18 '12 at 8:49
1  
Have you tried 'for's without indents? –  Brian Apr 18 '12 at 9:36
    
@Brian "Have you tried 'for's without indents?" - nope, for some reason I didn't realize the indents in the 'for's aren't needed. Thanks for the suggestion! Strictly speaking it doesn't answer the question, but provides an acceptable work-around, so in a way it answers my question. –  Luc C Apr 18 '12 at 10:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Just a few weeks ago, I wrote a paper with Don Syme that tries to explain some of the motivation behind the syntax choices in F# computation expressions (such as sequence expressions, asynchronous workflows and others). You can find it here. It does not give definite answer to your question, but it may help.

In general, when you have some type M<'T> and you're defining computation builder, you can add methods For and Bind to enable for and let! syntax:

For  : seq<'T> -> ('T -> M<'T>) -> M<'T>
Bind : M<'T>   -> ('T -> M<'T>) -> M<'T>

The input for For should always be some sequence seq<'T>, while the input for Bind should be the type M<'T> for which you're defining it.

In sequence expressions, these two operations would have the same type and so they would have to do the same thing. Although sequence expressions could provide both, it is probably a good idea to allow just one, because using two different keywords for one thing would be confusing. A general principle is that code in comp { .. } block should behave like normal code - and since for exists in normal F# code, it makes sense to use the same syntax inside computation expression for seq<'T>.

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1  
Thanks for the explanation! Personally I think I would have left both syntax options, as the thought train leading to each of those may be different, even if they are functionally the same.In my case I was looking for an operation that happened to match the Bind signature for an M<'T> that could represent some kind of collection of 'T. Later I realized that good old seq<'T> already did everything I needed, so I tried to use the Bind of seq {...}, which meant writing "let!" inside the seq {...} expression. That was where I bumped into the error message... –  Luc C Apr 18 '12 at 12:21
2  
Nice paper, Tomas! –  Daniel Apr 18 '12 at 20:42
1  
The link to the paper currently gives a 404, is there another way to find it? –  VisualMelon Aug 23 at 10:18

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