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First: I know my question is not about a parent class, but I don't know how this structure is called and I thought parent would be the easiest to describe it.

I have two classes defined like this:

class class_a {
    void foo() {
        //stuff
    }
};

class class_b {
    class_a A;
    void foo() {
        //more stuff
    }
};

I want class_b::foo(); called when certain requirements are met in class_a::foo(); It's possible to just set a variable in class_a and check for it in class_b::foo(); but I was wondering if there is a more elegant solution to this.

note: class_b is and can not be derived from class_a.

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1  
Why not just use local variable in class_b::foo()? –  Eric Z Apr 18 '12 at 8:34
1  
What about storing a function pointer based on certain requirements? –  Nick Apr 18 '12 at 8:35
2  
although there are workarounds to achieve this behaviour this smells like a bad design.. what are you really trying to do? –  Karoly Horvath Apr 18 '12 at 8:39
    
I think you should be more specific about what certain requirements are, why they are being met in class_a::foo(), etc. –  goldilocks Apr 18 '12 at 8:40
    
@KarolyHorvath I am trying to create a tetris attack clone for a school assignment. I created a class for an entire field, a class for a single row of blocks and one for the cursor. I did this because my teacher wanted me to put everything in classes. the field class owns both the row and the cursor class. In this situation the cursor class handles user input, but I need to alter the position of the blocks, wich are part of the row class, when spacebar is pressed. –  Kevin Apr 18 '12 at 8:47
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure I completely understand what you are trying to do, a more concrete example would be helpful, but perhaps this does what you want:

class class_b;

class class_a {
    void foo(class_b* b);
};

class class_b {
    class_a A;
    void foo() {
        A.foo(this);
    }
    void foo_impl() {
        // stuff based on requirements in a::foo
    }
};

void class_a::foo(class_b* b) {
    //stuff
    if (conditionsMet()) {
        b->foo_impl();
    }
}
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I think is closest to what I'm trying to achieve. Thank you :) –  Kevin Apr 18 '12 at 9:08
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One thing you can do is create a third class that abstracts this behavior, whether it derives from both, or is just independent.

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For the terminology, class_b contains, or owns an instance of class_a.

For calling class_b::foo from class_a::foo, you need to make the instance of class_b available to class_a::foo. This can be achieved either by adding a member variable to class_a as you noted, or a parameter to class_a::foo (both of which creates a circular dependency between the two classes, which is better avoided - you should rather rethink your design). Or via a global variable (which is usually not recommended either, as it makes it hard to follow the flow of control, to unit test, etc.).

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