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I have a dict such as:

d=dict()
d[('1','2')] = 'value'

Then I query the key :

if (k1,k2) in d.keys():

When there is million records,the speed is a suffering, any problem with the 'in' operator?

Is it sequential search?

I have to concat str as key to bypass this issue.

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Can you show us the code you used to arrive at this conclusion? –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 18 '12 at 8:52
    
Quite interesting problem, I ll look into this –  Julius F Apr 18 '12 at 8:55
    
Your edit introduces an entirely new question: why don't you ask it in a separate question? I think that would make more sense. –  Nolen Royalty Apr 18 '12 at 9:32
    
I rolled the question back to its original form. If you want to ask a different question, ask it in a new question. –  David Heffernan Apr 18 '12 at 9:38
    
Sorry, I'm a newcomer in stackoverflow. Last edit is show the code . –  lbaby Apr 18 '12 at 9:59

2 Answers 2

You should use

(k1,k2) in d

instead of calling d.keys().

Doing it your way, in Python 2 will result in a linear search and rather negates the benefits of a dict. In Python 3 your code is efficient (see comments below) but my version is clearer.

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Does this hold true for both Python 2 and 3? I thought .keys() would provide a view object in Python 3, not a list? –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 18 '12 at 8:56
3  
I'm struggling to see why someone would even use d.keys(). In Python 2.x, this will create a list of a million records every time. Even in 3.x, it's still totally redundant. –  Lattyware Apr 18 '12 at 8:57
    
@TimPietzcker Even if it creates an iterable view object, the in operator will have to perform linear search. You need to apply the in operator to the dict object. –  David Heffernan Apr 18 '12 at 8:57
2  
@DavidHeffernan A dict view of keys is set-like, so it would have the same performance as the dict itself. –  Lattyware Apr 18 '12 at 8:59
2  
@DavidHeffernan Take a read - they are actually very flexible things in Python 3. –  Lattyware Apr 18 '12 at 9:03

Given Nolen Royalty's addition, I thought I'd make note that you can actually do the timeit tests in a slightly better way. By moving the construction of the dict into a setup function, we can time only the operations on the dict, giving us a result we can compare with easily.

In 3.2:

python -m timeit -s 'd = {(str(i), str(j)):"a" for i in range(100) for j in range(1000)}' '_ = ("1", "2") in d.keys()' '_ = (1, 2) in d.keys()'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.404 usec per loop

python -m timeit -s 'd = {(str(i), str(j)):"a" for i in range(100) for j in range(1000)}' '_ = ("1", "2") in d' '_ = (1, 2) in d'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.247 usec per loop

You can see the difference. In 3.x, working directly on the dict gives us an almost 2x speed increase, which isn't bad.

In 2.7.3:

python2 -m timeit -s 'd = {(str(i), str(j)):"a" for i in range(100) for j in range(1000)}' '_ = ("1", "2") in d.keys(); _ = (1, 2) in d.keys()'
10 loops, best of 3: 36.3 msec per loop

python2 -m timeit -s 'd = {(str(i), str(j)):"a" for i in range(100) for j in range(1000)}' '_ = ("1", "2") in d' '_ = (1, 2) in d'
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.197 usec per loop

In 2.x, the difference is truly staggering. Using dict.keys() takes 36,300 microseconds, while just the dict takes under 0.2 microseconds. That's nearing two hundred thousand times faster.

Just thought that was worth a note.

Edit:

Tim made an interesting comment, so I decided to do anther test. I tried just constructing the list, and then just doing the hash lookup, results as follows:

python2 -m timeit -s 'd = {(str(i), str(j)):"a" for i in range(100) for j in range(1000)}' 'd.keys()' 'd.keys()'
100 loops, best of 3: 5.84 msec per loop

python2 -m timeit -s 'd = {(str(i), str(j)):"a" for i in range(100) for j in range(1000)}' -s 'l=d.keys()' '_ = ("1", "2") in l' '_ = ("1", "2") in l'
10 loops, best of 3: 25.3 msec per loop

You can see that on a large dict like this, constructing the list takes about 1/6th of the time, doing the search through the list 5/6ths of the time.

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Great - and I'm pretty sure that this vast difference is not primarily because of linear search vs. hash lookup but because of the construction of a list of keys for every iteration, as you suggested in your comment to @DavidHeffernan's answer. –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 18 '12 at 10:03
    
Thanks a lot for the tip, I had no idea you could easily pass a setup function like that. +1 –  Nolen Royalty Apr 18 '12 at 10:05
    
@NolenRoyalty It's really useful - you can also do multiple setups by using the flag multiple times. You can also avoid using semicolons by putting more quoted strings. Makes doing complex tests much easier. –  Lattyware Apr 18 '12 at 10:06
2  
@TimPietzcker Actually, I just did a check and edited my answer to add in my results - most of the time is spent on the search. I must admit, I thought that the list creation would be the biggest factor. (Then again, I didn't think the difference would be this massive either). –  Lattyware Apr 18 '12 at 10:10
    
@Lattyware: Wow. Great, thanks for getting to the bottom of this. –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 18 '12 at 10:14

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