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I'm using the latest stable MySql Connector/NET 6.5.4.0.

I open a connection to a MySQL database. In the C# code, the Connection.State property is Open. I do some magic stuf, and while I'm doing that, I kill the connection server side. However, in the code the State is still Open.

I ran into this problem because I save instances of my database class in a static variable per session (Dictionary). If a user does a request, the database class is pulled from this variable, and queries are fired to it. However, if the connection closes server side (killed by de sysadmin, wait timeout elapsed), the state isn't updated.

Is there a workaround for this problem? My colleague allready submitted a bug report for it (http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=64991).

Close and Open before execution, is very bad for the performance, so no option.

share|improve this question
    
Have you looked at the connection.Ping method? If it's false, the connection is closed. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/… You may also want to subscribe to the StateChange event on the connection to check what is happening. As a general piece of advice, you probably shouldn't cache the connection as a member of a static; as long as connection pooling is on, you shouldn't see any meaningful performance gains by holding onto an instance of the connection. In addition, what happens if an erorr occurs? – dash Apr 18 '12 at 9:44
    
Connection pooling is turned off in this case, I'll look into the Ping method. If thi connection is closed, I get an 'Fatal error encountered during command execution' – Michiel van Vaardegem Apr 18 '12 at 9:55
    
The Ping() method works, but takes a lot of time (0.020 sec every call). The StateChange event is fired too late (when calling execute reader). – Michiel van Vaardegem Apr 20 '12 at 9:16

Putting aside design issues (should really be pooling), based on your comment:

Connection pooling is turned off in this case, I'll look into the Ping method. If this connection is closed, I get an 'Fatal error encountered during command execution'

Is there any reason you're not recreating the connection if the ping fails?

private static MySqlConnection conn;
private static int maxRetries;

private static void connect()
{
    conn = <connect code>;
}

private static MySqlConection GetConnectionRetry(int count)
{
    if (conn != null && conn.State == Open)
    {
        try
        {
            conn.Ping();
            return conn;
        }
        catch (Exception e) // better be specific here
        {
            if (count <= maxRetries)
            {
                connect();
                return GetConnectionRetry(count + 1);
            }
            else throw e;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        connect();
        return GetConnectionRetry(count + 1);
    }
}

static MySqlConnection GetConnection()
{
    return GetConnectionRetry(1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The Ping method takes a lot of time. If I have to ping before every command, it's a huge performance issue – Michiel van Vaardegem Apr 20 '12 at 9:17
    
How about you do it without the ping? It will still throw an exception and the rest of the logic will take over. – yamen Apr 20 '12 at 13:22
    
Yes I can do this, but it's still an ungly workaround in my opinion – Michiel van Vaardegem Apr 25 '12 at 7:10
    
It's in an exception scenario and it's hidden behind the API. But your choice! – yamen Apr 25 '12 at 8:19
    
Another point with that solution are transactions. If there is an open transaction, and a query fails, I have to close and open the connection. The transaction is rolled back, but the new executed command is executed, while it should be in the same transaction.. – Michiel van Vaardegem May 4 '12 at 8:57

I would advise you to use the singelton-pattern for the connection. So you can ensure that there is always just one connection open and you only have to manage this one.

share|improve this answer
    
In this case, we don't want one connection for all the users, but a single connection per user. – Michiel van Vaardegem Apr 18 '12 at 9:55

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