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I have a file, file1.txt, like this:

This is some text.
This is some more text. ② This is a note.
This is yet some more text.

I need to delete any text appearing after "②", including the "②" and any single space appearing immediately before, if such a space is present. E.g., the above file would become file2.txt:

This is some text.
This is some more text.
This is yet some more text.

How can I delete the "②", anything coming after, and any preceding single space?

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What OS? What encoding of your text? –  yazu Apr 18 '12 at 12:08
    
The file is UTF-8 on Debian. –  Village Apr 18 '12 at 14:06

4 Answers 4

A Perl solution:

$ perl -CS -i~ -p -E's/ ②.*//' file1.txt

You'll end up with the correct data in file1.txt and a backup of the original file in file1.txt~.

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I hope you do realize most unix utilities do not work with unicode. I assume your input is in UTF-8, if not you have to adjust accordingly.

#!/bin/bash
function px {
 local a="$@"
 local i=0
 while [ $i -lt ${#a}  ]
  do
   printf \\x${a:$i:2}
   i=$(($i+2))
  done
}
(iconv -f UTF8 -t UTF16 | od -x |  cut -b 9- | xargs -n 1) |
if read utf16header
then
 echo -e $utf16header
 out=''
 while read line
  do
   if [ "$line" == "000a" ]
    then
     out="$out $line"
     echo -e $out
     out=''
   else
    out="$out $line"
   fi
  done
 if [ "$out" != '' ] ; then
   echo -e $out
 fi
fi |
 (perl -pe 's/( 0020)* 2461 .*$/ 000a/;s/ *//g') |
 while read line
  do
    px $line
  done | (iconv -f UTF16 -t UTF8 )
share|improve this answer

sed -e "s/[[:space:]]②[^\.]*\.//"

However, I am not sure that the ② symbol is parsed correctly. Maybe you have to use UTF8 codes or something like.

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It does not seem to remove any text, even when I tried with a simpler symbol, such as a letter. –  Village Apr 18 '12 at 11:58
    
It worked for me. Which platform do you use? Maybe your sed need an option for a specific syntax. –  Matthias Apr 18 '12 at 12:03
    
I have GNU sed version 4.2.1. –  Village Apr 18 '12 at 12:06
    
Try to add -r (at some platforms: -E) to switch extended regex syntax. –  Matthias Apr 18 '12 at 12:22
    
According to the documentation, -r should switch on regex, but it still does not work. –  Village Apr 18 '12 at 12:33

Try this:

sed -e '/②/ s/[ ]*②.*$//'
  • /②/ look only for the lines containing the magic symbol;
  • [ ]* for any number (matches none) of spaces before the magic symbol;
  • .*$ everything else till the end of line.
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