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I need to create a vbs to sort a seteable number of files (only the files) by the modified date in a folder with subfolders, and print the file with the absolute path, like this:

The vbs:

Dim MAX
Dim Folder
MAX = 100
Folder = "C:\Test"
vbscript functions to group all files of all subfolders, and sort them by MOD date... ok
vbscript funciont to make a text file output (This i can't do it by myself)
end

The text file output (100 newest files):

c:\newest 1st file.txt
c:\subfolder1\newest 2nd file.txt
c:\subfolder7\newest 3rd file.txt
c:\subfolder2\newest 4 file.txt
c:\subfolder8\newest 5 file.txt
c:\subfolder4\newest 6 file.txt
c:\subfolder2\newest 7 file.txt
c:\newest 8 file.txt
c:\subfolder3\newest 9 file.txt
etc...

Really no matther if the solution can it be done with Batch, I agree, But i've tried this:

Dir /S /TC /O-D

And the only problem is that don't show me the absolute path...

EDIT: Oh, and ofcourse I've tried:

Dir / B / S / TC / O-D

But the /B parameter implies a GREAT difference on the command that I said before ...

I mean:

Dir / S / TC / O-D

The command groups (together) all files in all subdirectories and sorts them by date. (GOOD!)

Dir / B / S / TC / O-D

The command going procesing folder by folder and ordering each file, and showing it. (BAD!)

So, if i need to sort neswest only 100 files, And if i use Batch dir command with "/B" parameter, i get this:

Output:

(Position 1) c:\subfolder1\Newest 1st file of this folder.txt
(Position 2) c:\subfolder1\Newest 2nd fil eof this folder.txt
(Position 3) c:\subfolder1\Old file of this folder.txt
(Position 3) c:\subfolder1\Older file of this folder.txt
(Position 4) c:\subfolder1\Oldest file of this folder.txt
(Position 5) c:\subfolder2\Newest 1st file of this folder.txt
(Position 6) c:\subfolder2\Newest 2nd file of this folder.txt
(Position 7) c:\subfolder2\Old file.txt
etc ...

So please don't tell me nothing about use dir with /B parameter, i know it good :(.

thanks again

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried using the /b switch? ;) –  Bali C Apr 18 '12 at 13:16
    
You'll need to load all the file path and names along with DateModified into an array, sort the array, and then iterate through the array and output the file path and name. –  HK1 Apr 18 '12 at 13:34
    
If possible, use an ArrayList for this. It has a build-in sort function. Standard array in VBScript does not. –  Guido Gautier Apr 18 '12 at 13:42
    
This is inconsequential since you cannot use a simple DIR solution - but the default /TW switch gives the last modified date, not /TC. Also, I don't see any difference in sort behavior with or without /B option. Both sort within folders, not across folders. –  dbenham Apr 19 '12 at 11:01
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do it with for command and ~ syntax (see for /?):

(for /r %A in (*) do @echo %~tA %A ) | sort /r

The use of brackets allows for single redirection od whole for to sort. Without brackes every echo would be redirected to individual sort, so no sorting would be done.

EDIT: As Ekkehard.Horner pointed out, the above code will work only in regions where dates are printed in yyyy-mm-dd format. In a region where dates are printed in mm/dd/yyyy format, you can use the following batch file:

@Echo Off
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion

if "%1"=="list" goto :list
%0 list | sort /r

endlocal
goto :EOF

:list
for /r %%A in (*) do (
  set t=%%~tA
  echo !t:~6,4!-!t:~0,2!-!t:~3,2! %%A
)
goto :EOF

I did not manage to repeat the trick with brackets inside a batch file, so the script calls itself with a parameter causing it to print the list of files and then sorts the output. The dates are converted to yyyy-mm-dd format by using %variable~:start-length% syntax (see set /?) and delayed variables expansion. It is not as bullet-proof as dbenham's solution, but it works.

share|improve this answer
    
The dates won't be sorted correctly if your regional settings don't specify a yyyy-mm-dd format. –  Ekkehard.Horner Apr 18 '12 at 18:55
    
You are right. In my country they are in yyyy-mm-dd format. There is possibility to parse other formats with additional for /f command, but definitely VBScript proves to be a language-independent solution. –  MBu Apr 18 '12 at 19:26
    
thanks, is very simplified solution, but the problem of the regional date.. :( –  ElektroStudios Apr 19 '12 at 14:29
    
Assuming the regional settings are OK, the %~tA time is limited to minute precision. That may or may not be good enough. –  dbenham Apr 19 '12 at 14:38
    
maybe... i can change the reginal date format from batch (only for use your code) and then back again to original format? –  ElektroStudios Apr 19 '12 at 15:28
show 3 more comments

I follow the advice of KH1 above: "You'll need to load all the file path and names along with DateModified into an array, sort the array, and then iterate through the array and output the file path and name", but in a Batch file. The program below use as index of the array the YYYYMMDDHHMM Modified Time Stamp of the file. This way, the array is kept automatically sorted by the Batch SET command. The parameters are the same of dbenham program above: FileCount and optional RootFolder.

@echo off
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion

rem Get order of FileTimeStamp elements independent of regional settings
for /F "skip=1 tokens=2-4 delims=(-)" %%a in ('date^<NUL') do (
   set timeStampOrder=%%a %%b %%c ho mi ap
)

rem For each file in the folder given by %2 (default current one)
for /R %2 %%F in (*.*) do (
   rem Extract FileTimeStamp data (yy mm dd ho mi ap)
   for /F "tokens=1-6" %%a in ("%timeStampOrder%") do (
      for /F "tokens=1-6 delims=/-.: " %%i in ("%%~tF") do (
         set %%a=%%i
         set %%b=%%j
         set %%c=%%k
         set %%d=%%l
         set %%e=%%m
         set %%f=%%n
      )
   )
   rem Adjust hour if needed
   if !ap! equ p set /A "ho=10!ho! %% 100 + 12
   rem Create the array element with proper index
   set "file[!yy!!mm!!dd!!ho!!mi!]=%%~fF"
)

rem At this point the array is automatically sorted

rem Show the first %1 array elements
set n=0
for /F "tokens=2 delims==" %%a in ('set file[') do (
   echo %%a
   set /A n+=1
   if !n! equ %1 goto finish
)

:finish
share|improve this answer
    
This answer shows OLDEST files instead of newest - could be fixed by using ('set file[ ^| sort /r'), but a temp file would be faster for large data sets. Bug Fix - Must add if !ho!==12 set ho=00 before adjusting for PM. Limitation - path/file names containing ! are corrupted. As written, this code is slightly faster than WMIC solution when there are few files per folder due to startup time for WMIC. But this solution becomes significantly slower than WMIC solution for large folders due to time stamp formatting. Fixing the ! limitation will slow it down even further (significantly). –  dbenham Apr 19 '12 at 10:49
    
Also, this solution must be modified for languages that do not use yy, mm, dd abbreviations. Examples are German and Russian. –  dbenham Apr 19 '12 at 10:51
    
Also, timestamp precision with this solution is limited to minutes. That may or may not be good enough. WMIC preserves full precision of timestamp as maintained by the OS. –  dbenham Apr 19 '12 at 14:31
    
hi, thanks for the help, i have like 400-500 files in each folder, a total of 5.000 files. The WMIC solution is great for me, but is TOO slow, So this code is faster or slower? someone can post the code with the supposed bugs (of velocity) fixeds? thankyou for all guys –  ElektroStudios Apr 19 '12 at 14:32
    
@user1248295 - I ran a test with hundreds of files, and this solution was 50% slower then the WMIC batch solution, and that is without fixing any of the existing bugs or limitations in this solution. Fixing the ! limitation in particular will make this solution even slower. I think VBS, JScript, or maybe PowerShell are your best bets to improve performance. But bear in mind that any solution may have significant time spent by the OS simply navigating and listing the tree contents. –  dbenham Apr 19 '12 at 15:06
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Here is a pure batch solution that uses only native commands - and it actually performs well :-)

I'm not sure if there might be additional characters that need to be escaped in the WMIC command, since I don't have much experience with WMIC. But otherwise I think it is fairly bullet proof.

::treeNewestFiles FileCount [RootFolder]
::
::  Searches the directory tree rooted at RootFolder and prints
::  the most recently modified files. The number of files printed
::  is limited to a maximum of FileCount. If RootFolder is not
::  specified then the root is the current directory.
::
@echo off
setlocal disableDelayedExpansion

::define base temp file name
set "tempFile=%temp%\fileDates%random%.txt"

::Loop through all folders rooted at %2 (current directory if not specified), and use
::WMIC to list last modified timestamp and full path of each file in each folder.
::The last modified timestamp is in UTC ISO 8601 format, so it sorts properly.
(
  for /r %2 %%F in (.) do (
    set "folder=%%~pnxF"
    set "drive=%%~dF"
    setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
    2>nul wmic datafile where (path='!folder:\^=\\!\\' and drive='%%~dF'^) get lastmodified, name
    endlocal
  )
)>"%tempFile%"

::Convert unicode to ansii
type "%tempFile%" >"%tempFile%2"

::Preserve only data rows
findstr "^[0-9]" "%tempFile%2" >"%tempFile%3"

::Sort the results in descending order
sort /r "%tempFile%3" >"%tempFile%4"

::Print first %1 files in results
set n=0
for /f "usebackq tokens=1*" %%A in ("%tempFile%4") do (
  echo %%B
  set /a "n+=1, 1/(%1-n)" 2>nul || goto finish
)

:finish
del "%tempFile%*"

New faster version

My original code made a new call to WMIC for each directory. It takes a significant amount of time for WMIC to initialize with each call. I reduced the execution time by 45% by building a script of commands and calling WMIC only once. The amount of performance gain is a function of the number of directories in the tree. The higher the number of directories, the more this new version will help. I'm sure there is still more performance gains to be had by converting to VBS, but I don't think it would be worth the effort. I believe this process is now pretty much optimized.

::treeNewestFiles FileCount [RootFolder]
::
::  Searches the directory tree rooted at RootFolder and prints
::  the most recently modified files. The number of files printed
::  is limited to a maximum of FileCount. If RootFolder is not
::  specified then the root is the current directory.
::
@echo off
setlocal disableDelayedExpansion

::define temp folder for temp files
set "tempFolder=%temp%\fildates%random%"
md "%tempFolder%"

::define base path\name for temp files
set "tempFile=%tempFolder%\tempFile.txt"

::Loop through all folders rooted at %2 (current directory if not specified),
::and build a script of WMIC commands that will list last modified timestamps
::and full path of files for each folder. The last modified tamestamp will
::be in ISO 8601 format, so it sorts properly.
(
  echo /append:"%tempFile%1"
  for /r %2 %%F in (.) do (
    set "folder=%%~pnxF"
    set "drive=%%~dF"
    setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
    echo datafile where (path='!folder:\^=\\!\\' and drive='%%~dF'^) get lastmodified, name
    endlocal
  )
  echo quit
)>"%tempFile%"

::Execute the WMIC script
::WMIC creates a temporary file in current directory,
::so change directory 1st so it doesn't interfere with results.
pushd "%tempFolder%"
cmd /c ^<"%tempFile%" wmic ^>nul 2^>nul

::Convert unicode to ansii
type "%tempFile%1" >"%tempFile%2"

::Preserve only data rows
findstr "^[0-9]" "%tempFile%2" >"%tempFile%3"

::Sort the results in descending order
sort /r "%tempFile%3" >"%tempFile%4"

::Print first %1 files in results
set n=0
for /f "usebackq tokens=1*" %%A in ("%tempFile%4") do (
  echo %%B
  set /a "n+=1, 1/(%1-n)" 2>nul || goto finish
)

:finish
popd
rd /q /s "%tempFolder%"
share|improve this answer
    
great code, thanks! –  ElektroStudios Apr 19 '12 at 14:27
    
@user1248295 - I managed to improve performance significantly for trees that have many folders. –  dbenham Apr 19 '12 at 20:38
    
thanks again for share your knowledge, when i've tested the first version f your code, i made this modification to improve a bit the velocity: type "%tempFile%1" | findstr "^[0-9]" | Sort /R > "%tempFile%2" and it seems good –  ElektroStudios Apr 19 '12 at 22:13
    
and set /A MAX=100, n=0 and then: (%max%-n) to make it more flexible the code, i think that i don't have made any bad, but you are the creator and the expert! PD: Sorry for my english –  ElektroStudios Apr 19 '12 at 22:15
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A three step demo to get you started:

Option Explicit

' ADO Constants needed in this demo
Const adDBTimeStamp      =        135 ' 00000087
Const adVarWChar         =        202 ' 000000CA
Const adClipString       =          2 ' 00000002

' Globals
Dim goFS   : Set goFS = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
Dim gsSDir : gsSDir   = "..."

' Dispatch using comments or re-order
WScript.Quit demoTraversal()
WScript.Quit demoDirWalker()
WScript.Quit demoAdoDirWalker()

' Step00: Understanding recursive traversal
Function demoTraversal()
  walkDir00 goFS.GetFolder(gsSDir)
End Function ' demoTraversal

' Minimal recursive traversal: do something for each file in folder and
' then call same Sub for each subfolder
Sub walkDir00(oDir)
  Dim oElm
  For Each oElm In oDir.Files
      WScript.Echo oElm.DateLastModified, oElm.Path
  Next
  For Each oElm In oDir.SubFolders
      walkDir00 oElm
  Next
End Sub ' walkDir00

' Step01: Recursive traversal with Class
' Use an object to abstract the 'something' action(s) and to augment
' state (count)
Function demoDirWalker()
  Dim oDirWalker : Set oDirWalker = New cDirWalker01.init()
  walkDir01 goFS.GetFolder(gsSDir), oDirWalker
  WScript.Echo oDirWalker.Count, "files seen"
End Function ' demoTraversal

Class cDirWalker01
  Private m_nCount
  Public Function init()
    Set init    = Me
    m_nCount    = 0
  End Function ' init
  Public Sub processFile(oFile)
    ' add bool expression or function to filter
    WScript.Echo oFile.DateLastModified, oFile.Path
    m_nCount = m_nCount + 1
  End Sub ' processFile
  Public Property Get Count()
    Count = m_nCount
  End Property ' Count
End Class ' cDirWalker01

Sub walkDir01(oDir, oDirWalker)
  Dim oElm
  For Each oElm In oDir.Files
      oDirWalker.processFile oElm
  Next
  For Each oElm In oDir.SubFolders
    ' add bool expression or DirWalker.method to filter
      walkDir01 oElm, oDirWalker
  Next
End Sub ' walkDir00

' Step02: Solution (POC)
Function demoAdoDirWalker()
  Dim oDirWalker : Set oDirWalker = New cAdoDirWalker.init()
  walkDir01 goFS.GetFolder(gsSDir), oDirWalker
  oDirWalker.sort "sPath ASC, dtLM ASC"
  WScript.Echo oDirWalker.getResultString()
  oDirWalker.sort "dtLM DESC, sPath ASC"
  WScript.Echo oDirWalker.getResultString()
End Function ' demoAdoDirWalker

Class cAdoDirWalker
  Private m_oRS
  Public Function init()
    Set init  = Me
    Set m_oRS = CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
    m_oRS.Fields.Append "dtLM" , adDBTimeStamp
    m_oRS.Fields.Append "sPath", adVarWChar, 255
    m_oRS.Open
  End Function ' init
  Public Sub processFile(oFile)
    m_oRS.AddNew
    m_oRS.Fields("sPath").Value = oFile.Path
    m_oRS.Fields("dtLM" ).Value = oFile.DateLastModified
    m_oRS.Update
  End Sub ' add
  Public Sub sort(sWhat)
    m_oRS.sort = sWhat
  End Sub ' sort
  Public Function GetResultString()
    m_oRS.MoveFirst
    GetResultString = m_oRS.GetString(adClipString, , " | ", vbCrLf, "NULL")
  End Function ' GetResultString
End Class ' cAdoDirWalker

The main idea is to use a Disconnected ADO Recordset to store and sort the collection of files in a folder tree.

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