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I have a test.php and i have the below code

<?php

    if(isset($_GET['p']) or $_GET['p'] != null) {
        echo $_GET['p'];
    } else {
        echo "Not found";
    }

?>

I have listed out below urls then required output are show

Test 1 : http://localhost/example/test.php
output : Notice: Undefined index: p in R:\xampp\htdocs\example\test.php on line 3
        Not found


Test 2 : http://localhost/example/test.php?p
output : blank page



Test 3 : http://localhost/example/test.php?p=
output : blank page


Test 4 : http://localhost/example/test.php?p=1
output : 1

I accept that Test 1 and Test 2 are true But when Test 2 and Test 3 fails out the solution.

share|improve this question
    
Which operators are better to use and or || – Rafee Apr 18 '12 at 10:55
1  
and = && and or = || ..... see here – ManseUK Apr 18 '12 at 11:00
    
Rafee, they have different precedence, meaning that or and || behaves differently without parentheses in some cases. It's almost always better to use && and || and use parentheses when needed. – Emil Vikström Apr 18 '12 at 11:05
up vote 5 down vote accepted
<?php

if(!empty($_GET['p']))
    echo $_GET['p'];
else
    echo "Not found";
?>
share|improve this answer
3  
This is the most correct since it's more obvious what's being done. Since isset already checks for NULL values, some people may be confused by the NULL check in other answers (which IS needed since it's a loose comparison, hence it's also checks for other "emptiness"). This is therefore the most readable and most maintainable answer! – Emil Vikström Apr 18 '12 at 10:55
    
Thank you @Emil! – Stefan Apr 18 '12 at 10:59
    
Yeah! thanks @EmilVikström for brief comment to understand why and stefan for short code – Rafee Apr 18 '12 at 11:02
2  
Just keep in mind that it will print "Not found" for ...test.php?p=0 as well. – VolkerK Apr 18 '12 at 11:11
if(isset($_GET['p']) and $_GET['p'] != null) {
    echo $_GET['p'];
} else {
    echo "Not found";
}

you need and as you want to check that it is set and is not null.

Like others have pointed out - you could use empty() :

if(!empty($_GET['p'])) {
    echo $_GET['p'];
} else {
    echo "Not found";
}

This will return true when the value is empty, the following is considered empty :

  • "" (an empty string)
  • 0 (0 as an integer)
  • 0.0 (0 as a float)
  • "0" (0 as a string)
  • NULL
  • FALSE
  • array() (an empty array)
  • var $var; (a variable declared, but without a value in a class)
share|improve this answer
    
Still would have the index error, though. – LeonardChallis Apr 18 '12 at 10:48
2  
@LeonardChallis why ? – ManseUK Apr 18 '12 at 10:49
    
How strange - I could haev sworn that said or before and not and... doesn't show as an edit though :| Maybe another question did that was deleted? Hmm. Apologies! – LeonardChallis Apr 18 '12 at 10:51
<?php

    if(isset($_GET['p']) and $_GET['p'] != null) {
        echo $_GET['p'];
    } else {
        echo "Not found";
    }

?>

The above code you mentioned as or so it will take any one of the following as true try with and

<?php

    if(isset($_GET['p']) and $_GET['p'] != null) {
        echo $_GET['p'];
    } else {
        echo "Not found";
    }

?>

And it will work perfect.

share|improve this answer

You are using an OR, so the second test will ALWAYS run. Meaning, if it's not set it will still try access it. You can use an AND instead (&&) so it will only check the value if it exists.

share|improve this answer

You should use empty() instead of isset().

<?php

if(empty($_GET['p'])) {
    echo "Not found";
} else {
    echo $_GET['p'];
}
share|improve this answer
    
No he can't, because it will produce undefined index on test1 – matino Apr 18 '12 at 10:51
    
@matino: No it won't. Iso: Already answered. – Stefan Apr 18 '12 at 10:53
1  
Yes he can, because empty() does not warn about undefined vars and only returns TRUE if so. – Iso Apr 18 '12 at 10:55
1  
Try it and see. Look at example #1 on this page: php.net/manual/en/function.empty.php – Stefan Apr 18 '12 at 10:58
2  
Appologies, checked it already ;) My bad :| – matino Apr 18 '12 at 10:59

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