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Should a web application have a notices/about page that details the components/libraries that we are using and there relevant licences?

Some Licences such as LGPL (Used by SevenZipSharp) have a combined works clause:

lgpl V3

  1. Combined Works. You may convey a Combined Work under terms of your choice that, taken together, effectively do not restrict modification of the portions of the Library contained in the Combined Work and reverse engineering for debugging such modifications, if you also do each of the following:

a) Give prominent notice with each copy of the Combined Work that the Library is used in it and that the Library and its use are covered by this License. b) Accompany the Combined Work with a copy of the GNU GPL and this license document. c) For a Combined Work that displays copyright notices during execution, include the copyright notice for the Library among these notices, as well as a reference directing the user to the copies of the GNU GPL and this license document. d) Do one of the following: 0) Convey the Minimal Corresponding Source under the terms of this License, and the Corresponding Application Code in a form suitable for, and under terms that permit, the user to recombine or relink the Application with a modified version of the Linked Version to produce a modified Combined Work, in the manner specified by section 6 of the GNU GPL for conveying Corresponding Source. 1) Use a suitable shared library mechanism for linking with the Library. A suitable mechanism is one that (a) uses at run time a copy of the Library already present on the user's computer system, and (b) will operate properly with a modified version of the Library that is interface-compatible with the Linked Version. e) Provide Installation Information, but only if you would otherwise be required to provide such information under section 6 of the GNU GPL, and only to the extent that such information is necessary to install and execute a modified version of the Combined Work produced by recombining or relinking the Application with a modified version of the Linked Version. (If you use option 4d0, the Installation Information must accompany the Minimal Corresponding Source and Corresponding Application Code. If you use option 4d1, you must provide the Installation Information in the manner specified by section 6 of the GNU GPL for conveying Corresponding Source.)

lgpl V2.1

You must give prominent notice with each copy of the work that the Library is used in it and that the Library and its use are covered by this License. You must supply a copy of this License. If the work during execution displays copyright notices, you must include the copyright notice for the Library among them, as well as a reference directing the user to the copy of this License. Also, you must do one of these things:

a) Accompany the work with the complete corresponding machine-readable source code for the Library including whatever changes were used in the work (which must be distributed under Sections 1 and 2 above); and, if the work is an executable linked with the Library, with the complete machine-readable "work that uses the Library", as object code and/or source code, so that the user can modify the Library and then relink to produce a modified executable containing the modified Library. (It is understood that the user who changes the contents of definitions files in the Library will not necessarily be able to recompile the application to use the modified definitions.) b) Use a suitable shared library mechanism for linking with the Library. A suitable mechanism is one that (1) uses at run time a copy of the library already present on the user's computer system, rather than copying library functions into the executable, and (2) will operate properly with a modified version of the library, if the user installs one, as long as the modified version is interface-compatible with the version that the work was made with. c) Accompany the work with a written offer, valid for at least three years, to give the same user the materials specified in Subsection 6a, above, for a charge no more than the cost of performing this distribution. d) If distribution of the work is made by offering access to copy from a designated place, offer equivalent access to copy the above specified materials from the same place. e) Verify that the user has already received a copy of these materials or that you have already sent this user a copy.

A number of other licences have similar clauses about displaying a notice in your application or combined works.

Does this mean that web applications need an about page detailing components used? I cant find any examples of websites doing this, although lots of sites will often be using OpenSource Libraries?

I guess the get out clause that websites/applications currently use is who would know if an OpenSource component was being used in a combined work/web application on the server side but that isn't an excuse especially if the web app was ever audited.

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1  
Do you mean open source libraries? You certainly are not using licenses in your software... –  Oded Apr 18 '12 at 11:26
    
yes open source libraries –  JonAlb Apr 18 '12 at 11:27
    
If you are unsure about what the license says, it's a good idea to ask at the different websites for the libraries if you really need to have such an about-page in your web application. –  Simon André Forsberg Apr 18 '12 at 11:29
    
for example.. SevenZipSharp uses LGPL : "You must give prominent notice with each copy of the work that the Library is used in it and that the Library and its use are covered by this License. You must supply a copy of this License. If the work during execution displays copyright notices, you must include the copyright notice for the Library among them, as well as a reference directing the user to the copy of this License. Also, you must do one of these things" Lots of sites/Web Applications will use this library –  JonAlb Apr 18 '12 at 11:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just because other does it wrong, doesn't give you the right to do it wrong.

If the license for a library says that your application should include a page with the appropriate credits, then that is what you should do.

Edit:

(This is my interpretation of the license agreement, I may be wrong).

I believe there's a (quite big) difference between a library and a web application. The license agreement posted above seems to be for other libraries, not for end-user webapplications. I believe that if you make your own library, from the SevenZipSharp library, the quote from the license agreement above applies - and forces you to distribute your library under LGPL as well. But if you use the SevenZipSharp library in an application that's meant for the user and not for developers, the above quote from the license does not apply.

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1  
I agree, but there are lots/most big commercial sites will reference one of more libraries. I'm struggling to find a web application in the wild that has a notices page that details this to use as an example case. –  JonAlb Apr 18 '12 at 11:30
    
Maybe ask on the websites for the libraries if they know about any example cases? –  Simon André Forsberg Apr 18 '12 at 12:08
    
In summary I think I agree that Most websites/web apps are breaking OSS licence rules by not doing this! Don't be naughty and make sure your website/web app is good. –  JonAlb Apr 16 at 16:50

Sorry for reopening this rather old question, but apparently there was no accepted conclusion. As a disclaimer, IANAL, so everything that follows is a layman's interpretation of how this licenses might be applied to this topic. I'm really looking for clarifications, confirmations or for someone proving me wrong!

My current interpretation is that a running Web Application does not "distribute" itself to every surfer, it merely generates output which is then rendered in the surfer's browser.

So the Web Application would be required to contain copyright / licensing notices in its own documentation / installation instructions / administrators/operators manual - which is targeted at the Web Application's users, which in fact is the one who installs, configures and operates it.

The licenses usually do not cover OUTPUT generated by an application, which is what the surfers visiting the web pages generated by the application consume. Thus, no copyright notice has to be included in the generated output, ie. the web pages.

In interactive Web Applications, the line between "the application" and "generated output" is not that clear and sharp, however, and might not even exist any more if parts of the application code are contained in the shipped web pages (as Javascript applications). So I'm not sure if my interpretation will hold or if it even is valid at all.

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