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Here is my code:

# header.py

def add_header(filename):
    header = '"""\nName of Project"""'
    try:
        f = open(filename, 'w')
    except IOError:
        print "Sorry could not open file, please check path"
    else:
        with f:
            f.seek(0,0)
            f.write(header)
        print "Header added to", filename

if __name__ == "__main__":
    filename = raw_input("Please provide path to file: ")
    add_header(filename)

When I run this script (by doing python header.py), even when I provide a filename which does not exist it does not return the messages in the function. It returns nothing even when I replace the print statements with return statements. How would I show the messages in the function?

share|improve this question
11  
It looks like you always create the file with 'w', right? – octopusgrabbus Apr 18 '12 at 12:14
    
@octopusgrabbus You might want to turn that into an answer - as it is the answer. – Gareth Latty Apr 18 '12 at 12:20
1  
Works for me. What exactly do you mean by "does not return the messages"? – Wooble Apr 18 '12 at 12:23
    
Also, keep in mind that if what you really want to do is write to the beginning of an existing file, you can't really do that. – Wooble Apr 18 '12 at 12:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a slightly modified version of Lattywares solution. Since it is not possible to append data to the beginning of a file, the whole content is read and the file is written anew including your header. By opening the file in read/write mode we can do both operations with the same file handler without releasing it. This should provide some protection against race conditions.

try:
    with open(filename, 'r+') as f:
        data = f.read()
        f.seek(0,0)
        f.write(header)
        f.write(data)
        #f.truncate() is not needed here as the file will always grow
    print("Header added to", filename)
except IOError:
    print("Sorry, could not open file for reading/writing")
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - this is a better solution than mine, I didn't know r+ wouldn't create a file. This method has the benefit of not needing to read the whole file in (which could use a lot of memory with large files), and the race condition as you mentioned. – Gareth Latty Apr 18 '12 at 12:44
    
I actually wanted to add this as a comment to your solution, but apparently I'm not yet allowed to do so ;) – pwuertz Apr 18 '12 at 12:51
    
Posting as a separate answer is the right thing to do here - it's a different, better solution - you deserve the credit for it. – Gareth Latty Apr 18 '12 at 12:52
    
Thank you, it works without reading the file first. – Jimmy Apr 18 '12 at 13:04
    
Uhm, but I do read the whole file. In order to avoid this, you must read/write open the original file, create a second file, write header and data to the second file by reading from the first file in chunks, then pivot the files on the filesystem, and then release the file handles. I hate this process as it is implemented like that in gedit, and a samba/cifs mounted shares does not support moving files with open file handles, thus, you cannot edit simple text files on a windows share with the default gnome editor. Other applications have similar problems if implemented like that. – pwuertz Apr 19 '12 at 19:19

I believe you are always creating the file. Therefore, you won't see a file not there exception. It does not hurt to put a write or file open write under try except, because you might not have privileges to create the file.

I have found with statements like try except and else to test those at the Python command line, which is a very excellent place to work out cockpit error, and I'm very experienced at generating a lot of cockpit error while proving out a concept.

The fact you're using try except is very good. I just have to go review what happens when a logic flow goes through one of them. The command line is a good place to do that.

share|improve this answer

The correct course of action here is to try and read the file, if it works, read the data, then write to the file with the new data.

Writing to a file will create the file if it doesn't exist, and overwrite existing contents.

I'd also note you are using the with statement in an odd manner, consider:

try:
    with open(filename, 'w') as f:
        f.seek(0,0)
        f.write(header)
    print("Header added to", filename)
except IOError:
    print("Sorry could not open file, please check path")

This way is more readable.

To see how to do this the best way possible, see user1313312's answer. My method works but isn't the best way, I'll leave it up for my explanation.


Old answer:

Now, to solve your problem, you really want to do something like this:

def add_header(filename):
    header = '"""\nName of Project"""'
    try:
        with open(filename, 'r') as f:
            data = f.read()
        with open(filename, 'w') as f:
            f.write(header+"\n"+data)
        print("Header added to"+filename)
    except IOError:
        print("Sorry could not open file, please check path")

if __name__ == "__main__":
    filename = raw_input("Please provide path to file: ")
    add_header(filename)

As we only have the choices of writing to a file (overwriting the existing contents) and appending (at the end) we need to construct a way to prepend data. We can do this by reading the contents (which handily checks the file exists at the same time) and then writing the header followed by the contents (here I added a newline for readability).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I will implement the readable code format. – Jimmy Apr 18 '12 at 13:06

this script opens a file in "w" mode (write mode),which means once the file dose not exist,it will be created. So No IOError.

share|improve this answer
    
Why give this as an answer when a number of people have already pointed this out? – Gareth Latty Apr 18 '12 at 12:47

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