Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is a piece of code that I was wondering if it should be refactored to make it more complied with the Clean Code practices.

This is a class which is responsible for refunding some orders made by customers.

class RefundServiceInvoker {

    private $_orders;

    public function refundOrder() {   
        $this->getOrdersFromDB(); //This function gets all orders from DB and sets $_orders
        foreach ($this->_orders as $order) { 
            try {
                $order->refund(); //Some lines may throw an exception when refunded due to some business logic (ex. the order was already shipped)
                $this->updateOrderStatus('refunded')            
            } catch (Exception $e) {                   
                $this->logError($e);
                $this->sendMailToAdmin();
            }
        }
    }
}

of course this code is highly simplified than my original code.

My main problem is if $order->refund(); throws an exception it will be caught and logged to DB then a mail is sent. However what if $this->logError($e); itself throws an exception? or what if the mail server was down and an exception was thrown?

Better what if the DB was down itself and $this->getOrdersFromDB(); throws an exception?

My first solution was to wrap everything in one big try{}catch{}:

public function refundOrder() {   
            try {              
            $this->getOrdersFromDB(); //This function gets all orders from DB and sets $_orders
            foreach ($this->_orders as $order) { 

                    $order->refund(); //Some lines may throw an exception when refunded due to some business logic (ex. the order was already shipped)
                    $this->updateOrderStatus('refunded')            
                } catch (Exception $e) {                   
                    $this->logError($e);
                    $this->sendMailToAdmin();
                }
            }
        }

But that would mean if one order fails then all fails!! Should I put 2 try{}catch{} one for the whole function and the other for each order? But in this case too the functions in the catch might throw an exception that won't be caught.

Note:

The application is built using Zend framework 1.11.11.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Does $this->logError() actually ever throw an exception? Seems like that might not be best practice, you could end up in an infinite loop quite easily. What you really need to do is decide what you want your application to do if the error logging/admin email sending fails. If you will just ignore the error and continue, simply don't throw any exceptions from those methods. If you want to die with stack trace, don't catch the exception. If you want to some how handle that situation, use an inner try/catch. IMHO... –  DaveRandom Apr 18 '12 at 12:44
    
Basically yeh, or inside the catch block of the above code - try { throw new Exception(); } catch (Exception $e) { try { handle_exception($e); } catch (Exception $e2) { } } –  DaveRandom Apr 18 '12 at 16:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you need to log and mail every exception, then you need something like this:

class RefundServiceInvoker {

   private $_orders;

   public function refundOrder() {
      try {
         $this->getOrdersFromDB();
         foreach ($this->_orders as $order) {
            try {
               $order->refund();
            } catch (MyBusinessException $e) {
               # deals with the problematic $order without stopping the loop
               $this->logError($e);
               $this->sendMailToAdmin();
            }
            $this->updateOrderStatus('refunded');
         }
      } catch(Exception $e) {
         # deals with unexpected bugs
         $this->logError($e);
         $this->sendMailToAdmin();
      }
   }
}

But you have to put a try/catch inside log and mail methods to prevent them to throw any exception when servers are offline, for example. If you don’t, the $orders loop will be stopped when log/mail fails.

If you need to log/mail only your business exception in refund() method, then you need something like this:

class RefundServiceInvoker {

   private $_orders;

   public function refundOrder() {
      $this->getOrdersFromDB();
      foreach ($this->_orders as $order) {
         try {
            $order->refund();
         } catch (MyBusinessException $e) {
            # deals with the problematic $order without stopping the loop
            $this->logError($e);
            $this->sendMailToAdmin();
         }
         $this->updateOrderStatus('refunded');
      }
   }
}

Any other exception will lead to an http 500 – internal server error page, which is usually what you want, because it’s an unexpected bug.

There’re other ways to handle this, but as you see, it depends on your needs.

share|improve this answer
1  
Also pay attention to what @Jon said, because if you need log/mail any exception on the whole system, the outermost try/catch I wrote in refundOrder should be placed outside your class, in your front controller. –  André Apr 18 '12 at 13:17
    
If I create an instance of class RefundServiceInvoker inside my controller then call refundOrder() should I put the outer try/catch in the controller instead? –  Songo Apr 18 '12 at 15:24
1  
If you were creating the whole system by yourself, then I think you should put the outermost try/catch inside your FRONT controller, the one that handles every http request. This way you would have only one try/catch to handle any unexpected bug. However, I see you are using Zend Framework, so you should look at the docs to learn how to properly register an error handler that will be able to catch any unexpected exception and do whatever you want (log/mail/etc). See framework.zend.com/manual/en/zend.controller.exceptions.html –  André Apr 18 '12 at 16:48
    
hmmmm I see your point. If I get it right Business logic exception or certain flow exception should be wrapped with a try/catch block, but for unexpected exception like database failure or server down should be handled from a centralized place and logged as system exception from the error controller as an example, right? –  Songo Apr 18 '12 at 18:47
    
Yes! Probably you always want to manually catch your custom business exceptions, because only you know what to do with them, but any other unexpected exception like db down can be handled in a centralized place, because the behavior in this case is always the same: usually a generic error page is shown. –  André Apr 18 '12 at 19:01

There is no magic bullet to solve such issues. If a function can throw and you care about it, you have to wrap try/catch around it -- simple as that.

To move into specifics: it's not really possible to evaluate the merits of this or that approach without having much more information about the architecture of your app, but here are some general suggestions:

  • Do check prerequisites before even calling refundOrder. Make sure that orders have been loaded successfully; make sure the orders you are going to operate on are all refundable (what's the purpose of trying to refund an order that is not refundable due to business logic? shouldn't the user/operator be notified of this before a refund is attempted?).
  • Do use more than one levels of try/catch, but perhaps not all inside refundOrder. The outer block is meant to catch any errors that were really unexpected, so what's the point in catching them inside refundOrder only? Don't you want to do that in other parts of you app as well? The innermost try/catch is necessary so that one non-refundable order won't kill all the process.
share|improve this answer
    
I forgot to mention that my application is built using Zend framework. If I create an instance of class RefundServiceInvoker inside my controller then call refundOrder() should I put the outer try/catch in the controller instead? –  Songo Apr 18 '12 at 15:22

As logError($e) and sendMailToAdmin() are probably functions that are used in last resort, typically in try/catch blocks, I would ensure that they never throw an Exception.

function logError($e)
{
    try
    {
        //your logic that may throw an Exception here
    }
    catch {}
}

function sendMailToAdmin($e)
{
    try
    {
        //your logic that may throw an Exception here
    }
    catch {}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just don’t let the “catch” statement empty, because swallowing exceptions is not good: you won’t know when a failure occurs. –  André Apr 18 '12 at 19:05
    
@André: I agree that swallowing exceptions is generally speaking not a good practice, but like you say yourself in your answer "you have to put a try/catch inside log and mail methods to prevent them to throw any exception"... So what would you put in these catch blocks ? –  nIcO Apr 18 '12 at 22:08
    
You better raise a warning, for example. So it will be available in webserver log file: catch(Exception $e) { trigger_error($e->getMessage(), E_USER_WARNING); } –  André Apr 19 '12 at 12:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.