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I need a custom query builder for mongodb. I have already done user interface which the list of documents(fields) available for querying. A user can select "Result columns", "Conditions", "Group by" and "Sort by". Let me explain in using SQL language.. see the example:

SELECT col1, col2 FROM table WHERE col1=1 AND col2="foo" OR col3 > "2012-01-01 00:00:00" OR col3 < "2012-01-02 00:00:00" AND col5 IN (100, 101, 102) GROUP BY col4, col5 ORDER BY col1 DESC, col2 ASC

so

  • SELECT col1, col2 -- result columns
  • WHERE col1=1 AND col2="foo" OR col3 > "2012-01-01 00:00:00" OR col3 < "2012-01-02 00:00:00" -- conditions
  • GROUP BY col4, col5 -- group by statement
  • ORDER BY col1 DESC, col2 ASC -- order by statement

columns count, conditions, group by and order by should be generated by Python based on JSON data submitted by a used with user interface.

I'm just curious is that possible to do for mongoDB with its MapReduce or not? May be you saw any modules for that? Also if you're good with MongoDB can you please translate this SQL query to MongoDB query?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The simplest (and most scalable) solution is probably to translate the filtering conditions into a MongoDB query, and do the aggregation on the client side.

Taking your example above, let's break it down and construct a MongoDB query (I'll show this using PyMongo, but you could do the same using Mongoengine or another ODM if you prefer):

WHERE col1=1 AND col2="foo" OR col3 > "2012-01-01 00:00:00" OR col3 < "2012-01-02 00:00:00" -- conditions

This is the first argument to PyMongo's find() method. We have to explicitly build the logical AND/OR tree using the $or operator:

from bson.tz_util import utc
cursor = db.collection.find({'$or': [
    {'col1': 1, 'col2': 'foo'},
    {'col3': {'$gt': datetime(2012, 01, 01, tzinfo=utc)}},
    {'col3': {'$lt': datetime(2012, 01, 02, tzinfo=utc)}},
]})

Note that MongoDB does not convert strings to dates when comparing against date/time fields, so I've explicitly done so here using the Python datetime module. The datetime class in that module assumes 0 as a default value for non-specified arguments.

SELECT col1, col2 -- result columns

We can use field selection to only retrieve the fields that we want:

from bson.tz_util import utc
cursor = db.collection.find({'$or': [
    {'col1': 1, 'col2': 'foo'},
    {'col3': {'$gt': datetime(2012, 01, 01, tzinfo=utc)}},
    {'col3': {'$lt': datetime(2012, 01, 02, tzinfo=utc)}},
]}, fields=['col1', 'col2'])

GROUP BY col4, col5 -- group by statement

This can't be done efficiently using standard MongoDB queries (though I'll show in a moment how you might use the new Aggregation Framework to do this all on the server side). Instead, knowing that we want to group by these columns, we can make the application code to do so simpler by sorting by these fields:

from bson.tz_util import utc
from pymongo import ASCENDING
cursor = db.collection.find({'$or': [
    {'col1': 1, 'col2': 'foo'},
    {'col3': {'$gt': datetime(2012, 01, 01, tzinfo=utc)}},
    {'col3': {'$lt': datetime(2012, 01, 02, tzinfo=utc)}},
]}, fields=['col1', 'col2', 'col4', 'col5'])
cursor.sort([('col4', ASCENDING), ('col5', ASCENDING)])

ORDER BY col1 DESC, col2 ASC -- order by statement

This should be done in your application code after applying the aggregate functions you want (suppose we want to sum over col4, and take the max of col5):

from bson.tz_util import utc
from pymongo import ASCENDING
cursor = db.collection.find({'$or': [
    {'col1': 1, 'col2': 'foo'},
    {'col3': {'$gt': datetime(2012, 01, 01, tzinfo=utc)}},
    {'col3': {'$lt': datetime(2012, 01, 02, tzinfo=utc)}},
]}, fields=['col1', 'col2', 'col4', 'col5'])
cursor.sort([('col4', ASCENDING), ('col5', ASCENDING)])

# groupby REQUIRES that the iterable be sorted to work 
# correctly; we've asked Mongo to do this, so we don't
# need to do so explicitly here.
from itertools import groupby
groups = groupby(cursor, keyfunc=lambda doc: (doc['col1'], doc['col2'])
out = []
for (col1, col2), docs in groups:
    col4sum = 0
    col5max = float('-inf')
    for doc in docs:
        col4sum += doc['col4']
        col5max = max(col5max, doc['col5'])
    out.append({
        'col1': col1,
        'col2': col2,
        'col4sum': col4sum,
        'col5max': col5max
    })

Using the Aggregation Framework

If you are using MongoDB 2.1 or later (2.1.x is the development series leading up to the 2.2.0 stable release expected soon), you can use the Aggregation Framework to do all of this on the server side. To do so, use the aggregate command:

from bson.son import SON
from pymongo import ASCENDING, DESCENDING
group_key = SON([('col4', '$col4'), ('col5': '$col5')])
sort_key = SON([('$col1', DESCENDING), ('$col2', ASCENDING)])
db.command('aggregate', 'collection_name', pipeline=[
    # this is like the WHERE clause
    {'$match': {'$or': [
        {'col1': 1, 'col2': 'foo'},
        {'col3': {'$gt': datetime(2012, 01, 01, tzinfo=utc)}},
        {'col3': {'$lt': datetime(2012, 01, 02, tzinfo=utc)}},
        ]}},
    # SELECT sum(col4), max(col5) ... GROUP BY col4, col5
    {'$group': {
        '_id': group_key,
        'col4sum': {'$sum': '$col4'},
        'col5max': {'$max': '$col5'}}},
    # ORDER BY col1 DESC, col2 ASC
    {'$sort': sort_key}
])

The aggregate command returns a BSON document (i.e. a Python dictionary), which is subject to the usual restrictions from MongoDB: it will fail if the document to be returned is greater than 16MB in size. Additionally, for in-memory sorts (as are required by the $sort at the end of this aggregation), the Aggregation Framework will fail if the sort requires more than 10% of the physical RAM on the server (this is to prevent costly aggregations from evicting all of the memory used by Mongo for data files).

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Amaizing answer! –  KennyPowers Apr 18 '12 at 15:14
    
Thank you very much! it what the best answer ever made for me :) –  KennyPowers Apr 18 '12 at 15:14

And what your problem. Sure you can do these query to Mongo, and mapreduce nothing to do with. If you want quick start with Mongo you can try ORM like mongoengine

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thanks for the link! –  KennyPowers Apr 18 '12 at 13:43
    
But how can this query be turned to mongo one without MapReduce? It uses group statement. Anyway it would be great to see how this SQL query can be turned into mongo's one –  KennyPowers Apr 18 '12 at 13:45
    
This is a good source for newcomers from SQL docs.mongodb.org/manual/reference/sql-comparison and groupby operator you can find in aggragation framework. –  Denis Mar 5 '13 at 11:01

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