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Is there an easy way (or tool) for finding the join path from one table to another in a large database?

I'm currently working on a project whose database has over 150 tables. Below is sort of the use case for what I'm trying to do.

Use Case:

Input

  • Select Table A
  • Select Table B

Output

  • Prints out all available paths between the tables.
  • Prints out most efficient route.
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1  
How would such a system work? Based on declared referential integrity constraints? Common column names? And how would "efficiency" be determined? Lowest number of intermediate tables? Would the query optimizer need to be involved? –  Larry Lustig Apr 18 '12 at 13:04
1  
If there is a model and if the database is well-designed there is no need for this kind of tool, you are doing it upside down... Anyway, you should check meta data of your tables and look for foreign keys –  Thomas Haratyk Apr 18 '12 at 13:08
    
I work with databases that exceed 1000 tables and have never needed a tool like this. Why are you doing this? Especially for such a tiny database. The joins should be self evident unless you hava an extremely badly designed database. Further if you have multiple paths from one table to the other, you also probaly have a poor design. –  HLGEM Apr 18 '12 at 20:55
    
I'm hoping for something that traverses the foreign keys to find the best path. Yes, I could write this myself, but I thought I would reach out to the community to see if anyone knew of such a utility. EDIT: Basically I was just brought on at a company and figure that it would help with learning the database structure. –  Tanner Watson Apr 19 '12 at 22:10
    
@TannerWatson I'm facing the exact same problem at my new company, did you write this opensource tool ; ) –  red2nb Nov 14 '14 at 11:04

3 Answers 3

Since I assume you have some very complex paths through the database, you won't be able to do it with just one query or even a few queries. I've done it (with a project I inherited), and learned some interesting things. But I had to write a program to do it.

What I did was use the schema views Diego references in his answer, and apply some methods for solving graph theory problems (since that's essentially what you've got, here, with the tables being nodes and the foreign keys links in a graph.)

Basically, if I remember correctly (this was a few years ago), you start with one table and then process all its foreign keys by putting the name of the other table each references into a queue. Check for self-references and loops (you'll need a hash set or list of the tables you have processed.) Then pop the next table off the queue and repeat. Eventually you will either encounter the other table or have processed every table you can "reach" from your original table.

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That's exactly what I was thinking. Seeing that no one knows of a utility looks like I'll be starting another open source project soon. I'll post the link in my question once its in a stable state. –  Tanner Watson Apr 19 '12 at 22:14
    
@TannerWatson Actually, I was thinking about doing that with my utility (assuming I can find the original code!) –  Ann L. Apr 20 '12 at 0:40
    
Even better! :D Let me know when/where the repository is located when you find the original source. Thanks again! –  Tanner Watson Apr 20 '12 at 13:37

This should help you. It will show you your table, the column that has the FK, table and column referenced to and FK name.

SELECT
K_Table = FK.TABLE_NAME,
FK_Column = CU.COLUMN_NAME,
PK_Table = PK.TABLE_NAME,
PK_Column = PT.COLUMN_NAME,
Constraint_Name = C.CONSTRAINT_NAME
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS C
INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS FK ON C.CONSTRAINT_NAME = FK.CONSTRAINT_NAME
INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS PK ON C.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME = PK.CONSTRAINT_NAME
INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE CU ON C.CONSTRAINT_NAME = CU.CONSTRAINT_NAME
INNER JOIN (
SELECT i1.TABLE_NAME, i2.COLUMN_NAME
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS i1
INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE i2 ON i1.CONSTRAINT_NAME = i2.CONSTRAINT_NAME
WHERE i1.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'PRIMARY KEY'
) PT ON PT.TABLE_NAME = PK.TABLE_NAME
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll check it out tomorrow to see if it works. :) –  Tanner Watson Apr 19 '12 at 22:11

I borrowed codes from Zen and above codes and create this. it seems working very well so far.

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb.dbo.#TableSchema') IS NOT NULL BEGIN DROP TABLE #TableSchema END
SELECT
PK_Table = PK.TABLE_NAME,
PK_Column = PT.COLUMN_NAME,
K_Table = FK.TABLE_NAME,
FK_Column = CU.COLUMN_NAME,
Constraint_Name = C.CONSTRAINT_NAME
INTO #TableSchema
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS C
INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS FK ON C.CONSTRAINT_NAME = FK.CONSTRAINT_NAME
INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS PK ON C.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME = PK.CONSTRAINT_NAME
INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE CU ON C.CONSTRAINT_NAME = CU.CONSTRAINT_NAME
INNER JOIN (
SELECT i1.TABLE_NAME, i2.COLUMN_NAME
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS i1
INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE i2 ON i1.CONSTRAINT_NAME = i2.CONSTRAINT_NAME
WHERE i1.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'PRIMARY KEY'
) PT ON PT.TABLE_NAME = PK.TABLE_NAME


CREATE TABLE [#TablesList] (
 c_from NVARCHAR(450), 
 c_to NVARCHAR(450),
 PRIMARY KEY (c_from, c_to)
 );


INSERT    INTO [#TablesList]
SELECT DISTINCT PK_Table,K_Table from #TableSchema


IF OBJECT_ID('__TablesLink__') IS NOT NULL BEGIN DROP TABLE [__TablesLink__] END
CREATE TABLE [__TablesLink__] (c_path NVARCHAR(MAX));-- PRIMARY KEY);


WITH PathCTE 
AS
(SELECT c_from, c_to,
        CAST('>' + CAST(c_from AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) + '>' + 
        CAST(c_to AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) + '>' AS NVARCHAR(MAX)) AS c_path
 FROM [#TablesList] AS C1
 UNION ALL
 SELECT C.c_from, C.c_to,
        CAST(P.c_path + C.c_to + '>' AS NVARCHAR(max))
 FROM PathCTE AS P
 JOIN [#TablesList] AS C
   ON P.c_to = C.c_from
 WHERE P.c_path NOT LIKE '%>' + 
                    CAST(C.c_from AS NVARCHAR(max)) + 
                    '>' + 
                    CAST(C.c_to AS NVARCHAR(max)) + 
                    '>%')

INSERT INTO [__TablesLink__]
SELECT c_path FROM PathCTE;


SELECT c_path
FROM [__TablesLink__]
WHERE c_path LIKE '>' + 'tableA' + '>%'
  AND c_path LIKE '%>'+ 'tableZ' +'>';
share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't return anything for me –  red2nb Nov 14 '14 at 9:55

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