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I'm trying something like that:

class point
{
public int x;
public int y;
}

point[] array = new point[100];
array[0].x = 5;

and here's the error: Object reference not set to an instance of an object. (@ the last line)

whats wrong? :P

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possible duplicate of C# (Array of object) object reference not set to an instance of an object - see my answer. –  DaveShaw Apr 18 '12 at 13:08
    
You may want to use a struct (value type) instead of class (references). Other than that, instanciate the class point in a loop using the constructor : array[i] = new point() –  Guillaume Apr 18 '12 at 13:10
    
You never created array[0], so how can you set its value to 5? –  David Schwartz Apr 18 '12 at 13:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It only creates the array, but all elements are initialized with null.
You need a loop or something similar to create instances of your class. Example:

point[] array = new point[100];
foreach(point p in array)
{
    p = new point();
}
array[0].x = 5;
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1  
To add to @Skalli's answer here, if your Point were a struct instead of a class (as the Point type is in the BCL), then you wouldn't need to worry about this. Class's need to be "new'd" when used in arrays, structs don't. –  Chris Shain Apr 18 '12 at 13:43
    
Whoever downvoted: Care to explain what you don't like about the question and how I can improve it? –  Skalli Nov 26 '13 at 7:43

When you do

point[] array = new point[100];

you create an array, not 100 objects. Elements of the array are null. At that point you have to create each element:

array[0] = new point();
array[0].x = 5;
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You can change class point to struct point in that case new point[500] will create an array of points initialized to 0,0 (rather than array of null's).

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+1 for pointing out the difference with structs! –  Nick Apr 18 '12 at 13:11

As the other answers explain, you need to initialize the objects at each array location. You can use a method such as the following to create pre-initialized arrays

T[] CreateInitializedArray<T>(int size) where T : new()
{
    var arr = new T[size];
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        arr[i] = new T();
    return arr;
}

If your class doesn't have a parameterless constructor you could use something like:

T[] CreateInitializedArray<T>(int size, Func<T> factory)
{
    var arr = new T[size];
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        arr[i] = factory();
    return arr;
}

LINQ versions for both methods are trivial, but slightly less efficient I believe

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int[] asd = new int[99];
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    asd[i] = i;

Something like that?

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If you are going to use an index, you better use for (int i=0; i < asd.Length; ++i)We don't want to risk an IndexOutOfRangeException. :) –  Skalli Apr 18 '12 at 13:28

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