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I have some tables which basically look as follows:

TBL_USER
user_id - number
user_name - varchar

TBL_STUFF
stuff_id - number
stuff_user_id - number

I want to query for all user information including the number of "stuff" they have. I was trying something like this:

select user_id, user_name, count(stuff_id) 
  from tbl_user
  left outer join tbl_stuff on stuff_user_id = user_id
 where user_id = 5;

but I get an error which says "not a single-group group function"

Is there some other way I should be doing this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could also do it like this:

select 
  user_id, 
  user_name, 
  (
    SELECT
        COUNT(*)
    FROM
        tbl_stuff
    WHERE 
        stuff_user_id = tbl_user.user_id

  ) AS StuffCount, 
from 
   tbl_user
where 
   user_id = 5;
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Well, you are missing the group function ;-)

Try this:

select user_id, user_name, count(stuff_id) 
from tbl_user left outer join tbl_stuff on stuff_user_id = user_id
where user_id = 5
group by user_id, user_name;

The last line is the group by clause that tells Oracle to count all rows with the same user_id and user_name combination.

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I'd give this +1 if it also was explicit with table names, rather than implicit ;) –  MatBailie Apr 18 '12 at 13:27
    
No need for explicit table names here. –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 18 '12 at 13:28
    
i tried adding "group by user_id" but I get the message "not a group by expression". Do I really need to add all of the fields, in my real query there are lots of other fields I'm selecting. –  Triton Man Apr 18 '12 at 13:28
    
@RockyTriton You are on Oracle not on MySQL. In this aspect Oracle is ANSI SQL compliant. –  Florin Ghita Apr 18 '12 at 13:31
    
Yes, you need to add all of the columns of the select clause to the group by clause, except when they are in an aggregate function like count, sum, min, max etc. –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 18 '12 at 13:31

One of your comments states that you don't want to include all the field present in a GROUP BY clause.

@Arion posted a correlated-sub-query re-factor that gives the same values.

The following query uses a standard (un-correlated) sub-query (inline-view) instead. This is because using this inline-view structure can often perform correlated-sub-query equivilents. But, also, because I find them easier to maintain.

WITH
  stuff_count
AS
(
  SELECT
    stuff_user_id  AS user_id,
    COUNT(*)       AS val
  FROM
    tbl_stuff
  GROUP BY
    stuff_user_id
)
SELECT
  tbl_user.user_id,
  tbl_user.user_name,
  stuff_count.val
FROM
  tbl_user
LEFT JOIN
  stuff_count
    ON stuff_count.user_id = tbl_user.user_id
WHERE
  tbl_user.user_id = 5;

NOTE: When the plan is generated, it only runs the sub-query for the user_id's necessary, not the whole table ;)

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