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I have a fairly stable directed graph of order ~100k vertices and size ~1k edges. It is two-dimensional insofar as its vertices can be identified by a pair of integers (x, y) (of cardinality ~100 x ~1000) and all edges are strictly increasing in x.

There is furthermore a dictionary of ~1k (key, val) pairs associated with each vertex.

I am currently storing the graph in a MySQL database across three (InnoDB) tables: a table of vertices (which I don't think is relevant to my question, so I have omitted to include both it and the foreign key constraints that refer to it in my extracts below); a table which holds the dictionaries; and a 'closure table' of connected vertices as described so eloquently by Bill Karwin.

The table of vertex dictionaries is defined as follows:

CREATE TABLE `VertexDictionary` (
  `x`   smallint(6) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `y`   smallint(6) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `key` varchar(50) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `val` smallint(1) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`x`, `y`  , `key`),
  KEY  `dict` (`x`, `key`, `val`)
);

and the closure table of connected vertices as:

CREATE TABLE `ConnectedVertices` (
  `tail_x` smallint(6) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `tail_y` smallint(6) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `head_x` smallint(6) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `head_y` smallint(6) unsigned NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY   (`tail_x`, `tail_y`, `head_x`),
  KEY `reverse` (`head_x`, `head_y`, `tail_x`),
  KEY `fx` (`tail_x`, `head_x`),
  KEY `rx` (`head_x`, `tail_x`)
);

There is also a dictionary of (x, key) pairs such that for each such pair, all vertices identified with that x have within their dictionaries a value for that key. This dictionary is stored in a fourth table:

CREATE TABLE `SpecialKeys` (
  `x`   smallint(6) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `key` varchar(50) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  PRIMARY KEY (`x`),
  KEY `xkey`  (`x`, `key`)
);

I often wish to extract the set of keys used in the dictionaries of all vertices having a particular x=X, together with the associated value of any SpecialKeys connected to the left:

SELECT DISTINCT
  `v`.`key`,
  `u`.`val`
FROM
       `ConnectedVertices` AS `c`
  JOIN `VertexDictionary`  AS `u` ON (`u`.`x`, `u`.`y`  ) = (`c`.`tail_x`, `c`.`tail_y`)
  JOIN `VertexDictionary`  AS `v` ON (`v`.`x`, `v`.`y`  ) = (`c`.`head_x`, `c`.`head_y`)
  JOIN `SpecialKeys`       AS `k` ON (`k`.`x`, `k`.`key`) = (`u`.`x`, `u`.`key`)
WHERE
  `v`.`x` = X
;

for which the EXPLAIN output is:

id   select_type   table   type     possible_keys           key       key_len   ref                                rows   Extra
 1   SIMPLE        k       index    PRIMARY,xkey            xkey          154   NULL                                 40   Using index; Using temporary
 1   SIMPLE        c       ref      PRIMARY,reverse,fx,rx   PRIMARY         2   db.k.x                                1   Using where
 1   SIMPLE        v       ref      PRIMARY,dict            PRIMARY         4   const,db.c.head_y                   136   Using index
 1   SIMPLE        u       eq_ref   PRIMARY,dict            PRIMARY       156   db.c.tail_x,db.c.tail_y,db.k.key      1   Using where

But this query takes ~10s to complete. Been banging my head against a brick wall trying to improve matters, but to no avail.

Can the query be improved, or should I consider a different data structure? Extremely grateful for your thoughts!


UPDATE

I'm still getting nowhere with this, although I did rebuild the tables and found the EXPLAIN output to be slightly different (as now shown above, the number of rows fetched from v had increased from 1 to 136!); the query is still taking ~10s to execute.

I really don't understand what's going on here. Queries to obtain all (x, y, SpecialValue) and all (x, y, key) tuples are both very fast (~30ms and ~150ms respectively), yet essentially joining the two takes over fifty times longer than their combined time... how can I improve the time taken to perform that join?

Output of SHOW VARIABLES LIKE '%innodb%'; below:

Variable_name                    Value
------------------------------------------------------------
have_innodb                      YES
ignore_builtin_innodb            ON
innodb_adaptive_flushing         ON
innodb_adaptive_hash_index       ON
innodb_additional_mem_pool_size  2097152
innodb_autoextend_increment      8
innodb_autoinc_lock_mode         1
innodb_buffer_pool_size          1179648000
innodb_change_buffering          inserts
innodb_checksums                 ON
innodb_commit_concurrency        0
innodb_concurrency_tickets       500
innodb_data_file_path            ibdata1:10M:autoextend
innodb_data_home_dir             /rdsdbdata/db/innodb
innodb_doublewrite               ON
innodb_fast_shutdown             1
innodb_file_format               Antelope
innodb_file_format_check         Barracuda
innodb_file_per_table            ON
innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit   1
innodb_flush_method              O_DIRECT
innodb_force_recovery            0
innodb_io_capacity               200
innodb_lock_wait_timeout         50
innodb_locks_unsafe_for_binlog   OFF
innodb_log_buffer_size           8388608
innodb_log_file_size             134217728
innodb_log_files_in_group        2
innodb_log_group_home_dir        /rdsdbdata/log/innodb
innodb_max_dirty_pages_pct       75
innodb_max_purge_lag             0
innodb_mirrored_log_groups       1
innodb_old_blocks_pct            37
innodb_old_blocks_time           0
innodb_open_files                300
innodb_read_ahead_threshold      56
innodb_read_io_threads           4
innodb_replication_delay         0
innodb_rollback_on_timeout       OFF
innodb_spin_wait_delay           6
innodb_stats_method              nulls_equal
innodb_stats_on_metadata         ON
innodb_stats_sample_pages        8
innodb_strict_mode               OFF
innodb_support_xa                ON
innodb_sync_spin_loops           30
innodb_table_locks               ON
innodb_thread_concurrency        0
innodb_thread_sleep_delay        10000
innodb_use_sys_malloc            ON
innodb_version                   1.0.16
innodb_write_io_threads          4
share|improve this question
    
Do you need a full join? What about a left join? –  Phpdna Apr 18 '12 at 16:08
    
@David: On which table(s)? I can't see how I would use a LEFT JOIN here... –  eggyal Apr 18 '12 at 16:13
1  
You say "There is also a dictionary of (x, key) pairs". But the 'SpecialKeys' table has a primary key on 'x' only. So there is no pair, but only a dictionary of x values. Each 'x' value having one 'key' value. Am I wrong? –  Skrol29 Apr 26 '12 at 23:28
1  
I also wonder why you query use a join on (k.key=u.key). Is there a true reason of wanting tail vertices only with the key equal to SpecialKeys? And why the final SELECT return the key of the head, and the value of the tail? –  Skrol29 Apr 26 '12 at 23:35
1  
@eggyal: ok thanks. But not having any clue about the logic won't help to find another way of querying. –  Skrol29 Apr 26 '12 at 23:41

6 Answers 6

Without spending time testing it, you provided an incomplete example? you should definitely try reordering of joined tables. Explain output provides some info, let's say ordering by key_len should be heuristically fastest. First table to be filtered on should be listed as last in case the optimizer is not able to figure that out, I believe.

So, let's say 'c, v, k, u' order is the best.

SELECT DISTINCT
  `v`.`key`,
  `u`.`val`
FROM
  `VertexDictionary`  AS `u`
  JOIN `SpecialKeys`       AS `k` ON (`k`.`x`, `k`.`key`) = (`u`.`x`, `u`.`key`)
  JOIN `VertexDictionary`  AS `v`
  JOIN `ConnectedVertices` AS `c` ON (`u`.`x`, `u`.`y`  ) = (`c`.`tail_x`, `c`.`tail_y`)
           AND (`v`.`x`, `v`.`y`  ) = (`c`.`head_x`, `c`.`head_y`)
WHERE
  `v`.`x` = X
;

'rows' would suggest 'c/u, k, v' order, but that depends on data:

SELECT DISTINCT
  `v`.`key`,
  `u`.`val`
FROM
  `VertexDictionary`  AS `u`
  JOIN `VertexDictionary`  AS `v`
  JOIN `SpecialKeys`       AS `k` ON (`k`.`x`, `k`.`key`) = (`u`.`x`, `u`.`key`)
  JOIN `ConnectedVertices` AS `c` ON (`u`.`x`, `u`.`y`  ) = (`c`.`tail_x`, `c`.`tail_y`)
                                 AND (`v`.`x`, `v`.`y`  ) = (`c`.`head_x`, `c`.`head_y`)
 WHERE
  `v`.`x` = X
;

Hope this helps.

UPDATE (avoiding the varchar join):

SELECT DISTINCT
  `v`.`key`,
  `u`.`val`
FROM
       `ConnectedVertices` AS `c`
  JOIN `VertexDictionary`  AS `u` ON (`u`.`x`, `u`.`y`  ) = (`c`.`tail_x`, `c`.`tail_y`)
  JOIN `VertexDictionary`  AS `v` ON (`v`.`x`, `v`.`y`  ) = (`c`.`head_x`, `c`.`head_y`)
WHERE
  (`u`.`x`, `u`.`key`) IN (SELECT `k`.`x`, `k`.`key` FROM `SpecialKeys` AS `k`)
AND
  `v`.`x` = X
;
share|improve this answer
    
Were you intending that I use STRAIGHT_JOIN? If not, the optimiser reduces your proposed queries to the same as my original (the EXPLAIN output and time-to-execute are no different); with STRAIGHT_JOIN, the first query had not completed after an hour (so I gave up) and the second is still running after 10 minutes... –  eggyal Apr 21 '12 at 13:41
    
I have no idea what a straight_join is. If optimizer changes those queries to the same you used, you should try some query hints to reorder those tables, I do not know mysql specifics on this. –  MarianP Apr 21 '12 at 15:45
    
Looking at it again, the problem might be with the temporary table being created on disk rather in memory, if the query cannot be changed to avoid it, try increasing tmp_table_size variable (maybe you'll need to increase max_heap_table_size too, as it is used if tmp_tabl_size is bigger) –  MarianP Apr 21 '12 at 16:12
    
Thanks @MarianP. AFAIK, the MySQL optimiser will reorder joins unless one uses the STRAIGHT_JOIN keyword to force a particular table order; as mentioned, your proposed order sadly results in far worse performance. I will have a look at temporary table size, although with only 624 records in the resultset I very much doubt this is the problem... indeed, I had understood that EXPLAIN showed "using filesort" if temp tables were written to disk? –  eggyal Apr 21 '12 at 16:14
    
one more thought: you have not mentioned if you tried to run the query without the distinct keyword? –  MarianP Apr 21 '12 at 17:21

Others might disagree, but I've had and regularly offer STRAIGHT_JOIN for queries... Once you KNOW the data and the relationships. Being that your WHERE clause is against the "V" table alias and it's "x" value, you are good with the index. Move THAT to the front position, then join from that.

SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN DISTINCT
      v.`key`,
      u.`val`
   FROM
      VertexDictionary AS v 

         JOIN ConnectedVertices AS c
            ON v.x = c.head_x
            AND v.y = c.head_y

            JOIN VertexDictionary AS u 
               ON c.tail_x = u.x 
               AND c.tail_y = u.y

               JOIN SpecialKeys AS k
                  ON u.x = k.x
                  AND u.key = k.key
   WHERE
      v.x = {some value}      

Curious to know how this realignment works for you

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion... sadly your proposed query above takes ~6min (EXPLAIN shows ~800k rows being selected from the first/v table). –  eggyal Apr 21 '12 at 11:47
    
@eggyal, wow... that really does surprise me... however, how many records is your query returning as ITs result... I'll think more on it hopefully over the weekend. –  DRapp Apr 21 '12 at 12:05
    
The query itself returns 624 records (after DISTINCT has been applied; ~1.1m if no DISTINCT). –  eggyal Apr 21 '12 at 13:43

Try rebuilding the query in stages; or at least give us some more points to identify where the bottlenecks are. Some combinations of the following queries should give you reasonable performance, if it is possible with out modifying the schema or data set.

What is the number of rows and exec times for the following queries for getting the list of suitable tail verticies (ie, that have a SpecialKey)

SELECT -- DISTINCT
    vd.x as tail_x, vd.y as tail_y, vd.val
FROM
    VertexDictionary vd
WHERE
    EXISTS (
        SELECT
            1
        FROM
            SpecialKeys sk
        WHERE
            vd.x = sk.x
        AND
            vd.key = sk.key
    )

or

SELECT -- DISTINCT
    vd.x as tail_x, vd.y as tail_y, vd.val
FROM
    VertexDictionary vd
JOIN
    SpecialKeys sk
ON
    vd.x = sk.x
AND
    vd.key = sk.key

or

SELECT -- DISTINCT
    vd.x as tail_x, vd.y as tail_y, vd.val
FROM
    VertexDictionary vd
WHERE
(vd.x, vd.key) IN (SELECT x, key FROM SpecialKeys)
-- also could try vd.key IN (SELECT sk.key FROM SpecialKeys sk WHERE sk.x = vd.x)

I'm hoping that one of these returns either small result set, or are at least quick to produce results. if low cardinality & large results apply distinct.

pick the best one from the previous two queries, and add to the next step: joining these suitable 'tails' to 'suitable heads'

SELECT -- DISTINCT
    cv.head_y as y,
    tv.val
FROM
(
    -- ADD SUB QUERY HERE also try nesting the subquery like: (select tail_x, tail_y, val from ([SUBQUERY]) as sq)

) as tv -- tail verticies
JOIN
    ConnectedVerticies cv
ON
    cv.tail_x = tv.tail_x
AND
    cv.tail_y = tv.tail_y
WHERE
    cv.head_x = X -- lets reduce the result set here.

Again, I'm hoping that one of these returns either small result set, or are at least quick to produce results. if low cardinality & large results apply distinct.

If it's falling over at this point, well there's not much hope of it getting faster to apply the last phase, and best to try a different approach.

As head x is known from the earlier query, we now just need to join on head_y and X to get v.key

SELECT DISTINCT
    inner_query.val,
    head.key
FROM
(
 -- previous nested subquery behemoth here, again, try a few things that might work.

) as inner_query
JOIN
    VertexDictionary as head
ON
    head.x = X
AND
    head.y = inner_query.y

Another approach, is to get a list of head.key, tail_x, and tail_y from

SELECT -- DISTINCT
    cv.tail_x as x,
    cv.tail_y as y,
    vd.key
FROM
    VertexDictionary vd
JOIN
    ConnectedVerticies cv
ON
    cv.head_x = vd.x
AND
    cv.head_y = vd.y
WHERE
    vd.head_x = X

How long does this take to execute, with & without distinct? how many results (w & w/o distinct)?

If it's fast and/or small, try using it as a subquery and joining to either another subquery potentiall of SpecialKeys & VertexDictionary if that's small (ie one of the first three queries if they worked well).

share|improve this answer
    
I'm aware this isn't a complete "answer" as much as a "build your own". However I'd be happy to at least test these approaches if given a test data set. –  Nathan M Apr 25 '12 at 12:30
    
Did you have a go at running any of these queries / or are you able to provide an example data-set? –  Nathan M May 1 '12 at 4:28

I suspect your problem is everything with the syntax

(k.x, k.key) = (u.x, u.key)

Can you rewrite as?

k.x = y.x and k.key = u.key

When you have a calculation on the left hand side of a clause, the dbms cannot optimize. By setting the comparison as a straight comparison, you may improve your performance.

e.g.

year(my_date) = '2012'

is slower than

'2012' = year(my_date)

I'm not sure if mysql treats the comparison as a column comparison or as a calculation.

Please try modifying your query to do column value comparisons.


Second optimization

Also - you are cross joining 4 tables. Multiplication is not additive - is it exponential. Are you sure this is what you intend? You may be better served getting starting with the smallest result set and then join only that result set to the next set.

select a.c1
from (
select t1.c1
from t1
join t2 on t1.c1 = t2.c1
) a
join t3 on t3.c1 = a.c1

etc...


third optimization

if option 2 helps, you may want to create indexed views and work from those instead of directly from the tables.


fourth optimization

don't use mysql. unless you have a team of dbas constantly monitoring for performance and tweaks, you will run into bad times with mysql. mysql is fine and fast with simple things, but starts sucking very badly if you do anything moderately complex. 4 years ago, i migrated from mysql to sql server express and my 10 minute queries took <2 sec with the same tables, indices, and queries...

if you want open source, postgres is much smarter than mysql as well


Create a view that incorporates the first 3 tables that is indexed on the v.key, u.val fields. Then run the query off of the 4th table and the view. Make sure the indices are built on the view before running.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @mson. I have previously tried your first suggestion to no avail; I think the optimiser already handles this with no difference (grateful if you can point me at references to the contrary, though!). Your second suggestion is something I have previously tried, also to no avail; I found that creating the arising intermediate tables resulted in worse performance - but perhaps this was due to imperfect optimisation? Your third suggestion is also something which I have previously tried, and again results in worse performance - see this blog for details. –  eggyal Apr 26 '12 at 16:06
    
Fourth optimisation is sadly out of the question: this is an incumbent application on an entrenched system. –  eggyal Apr 26 '12 at 16:11
    
you've been thorough... i'm puzzled by your empirical findings - they don't match the theory. i don't know if you can provide your schema and data, but this is interesting and i'd love to take a deeper look. –  mson Apr 26 '12 at 16:13
    
Is not the schema already provided in the question? The data is huge (and, in any event, confidential) - I could provide some sample data, but it'd be no different to randomly constructing one's own... –  eggyal Apr 26 '12 at 16:14
    
So I elaborated on the view optimization. It looks like the most expensive bit is the sorting of all the rows. I'm not saying to create intermediate tables - but to create indexed views with the key specified above. the creation of the view will be as slow as it is now, but once it's built, subsequent queries on it should be faster. –  mson Apr 26 '12 at 17:25

DISTINCT is often a bad friend. Try to replace it with a GROUP BY. Like this :

SELECT sub.key, sub.val
FROM (
    SELECT 
      v.key,
      u.val
    FROM
      ConnectedVertices AS c
      JOIN VertexDictionary  AS u ON (u.x, u.y  ) = (c.tail_x, c.tail_y)
      JOIN VertexDictionary  AS v ON (v.x, v.y  ) = (c.head_x, c.head_y)
      JOIN SpecialKeys       AS k ON (k.x, k.key) = (u.x, u.key)
    WHERE (v.x = @X)
) AS sub
GROUP BY sub.key, sub.val

UPDATE:

Then try the following query which forces the indexes to use:

SELECT DISTINCT
  v.key,
  u.val
FROM
  ConnectedVertices AS c USE INDEX (fx,rx)
  JOIN VertexDictionary  AS u USE INDEX (primary) ON (u.x, u.y  ) = (c.tail_x, c.tail_y) 
  JOIN VertexDictionary  AS v USE INDEX (primary) ON (v.x, v.y  ) = (c.head_x, c.head_y)
  JOIN SpecialKeys       AS k USE INDEX (primary) ON (k.x, k.key) = (u.x, u.key)
WHERE (v.x = @X)

If it still not better, try this one :

SELECT DISTINCT
  v.key,
  u.val
FROM
       ConnectedVertices AS c
  JOIN VertexDictionary  AS u ON (u.x=c.tail_x) AND (u.y=c.tail_y)
  JOIN VertexDictionary  AS v ON (v.x=@X) AND (v.y=c.head_y)
  JOIN SpecialKeys       AS k ON (k.x=u.x) AND (k.key=u.key)
WHERE
  v.x = @X
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion @Skrol29. I did try this early on and found performance to be marginally worse, although I don't have the exact amount to hand... –  eggyal Apr 26 '12 at 23:23
    
@eggyal: is it better with the update above? –  Skrol29 Apr 27 '12 at 0:06
    
I will have a go at running the first of your queries tomorrow; the second definitely won't return what I need: the JOIN conditions are utterly wrong... –  eggyal Apr 27 '12 at 0:12

i don't think that forcing uses of specifique indexes is a good think. the Mysql optimiser has often good estimations.

do you have an index on v.x ?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion. The schema are given in the question; the VertexDictionary table has two indices with x in the leftmost column: the PRIMARY KEY and dict. And I'm not forcing (or even suggesting) use of any specific index, am I? :s –  eggyal Apr 27 '12 at 16:23

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