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I am using WMI to monitor some hundreds of hosts. I am polling for CPU usage about every 5 seconds. I am using C#'s thread pool to run the currently scheduled appropriate WMI queries. Usually, there are no more than 30 or so threads running the queries. Sometimes there is like 16 seconds gap instead of 5 seconds with no visible CPU usage. Because the CPU is underutilized, I suspect the bottleneck to be in RPC or TCP/IP stack. However I think it is not the TCP/IP stack because the connections are permanently held open. So I suspect the bottleneck to be in RPC on the monitoring machine.

Is there any RPC tuning I can do on the monitoring machine?

UPDATE 1:

I have already done some .NET tuning before I posted. I have tuned the ThreadPool with the ThreadPool.SetMinThreads(200, 200) and ThreadPool.SetMaxThreads(300,300) calls. I am using the Task objects, all created with TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning | TaskCreationOptions.PreferFairness.

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1 Answer 1

I am using C#'s thread pool

Which is not a good idea if you are running code that does a lot of blocking and little executing. Like WMI queries. The thread pool scheduler tries to limit the number of executing threads to the number of cores on your machine. That's an optimization, it reduces the amount of overhead lost to thread context switches. But it can't predict or detect that threads are not actually executing code. It has an adaptive scheduling algorithm to deal with it, allowing extra threads to execute when the existing ones are not finishing, but that operates slowly.

You can call ThreadPool.SetMinThread() to increase the number of threads that are allowed to execute concurrently. The default is the number of cores. Increasing it to 30 fixes your problem but has global side-effects. Using a Thread instead of the thread pool is a local solution.

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Unfortunately, I have already done that before I posted. I have tuned the ThreadPool with the ThreadPool.SetMinThreads(200, 200) and ThreadPool.SetMaxThreads(300,300) calls. I am using the Task objects, all created with TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning | TaskCreationOptions.PreferFairness. –  wilx Apr 19 '12 at 8:39

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