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I'm trying to use Interface class and I have a question about Interface method parameters.

I have an Interface class to make child class use specific method. but the child classes need different number of parameters for the method.

Example,

public interface IPayment
{
  void MakePayment();
}

and define the MakePayment method in child classes.

public class PayPay : IPayment
{
  public void MakePayment(string a); // it needs only one parameter
}

public class Google : IPayment
{
  public void MakePayment(string a, int b); // it needs two parameters.
}

Like above case, How can I modify my interface class?

Thank you!

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2  
The interface and all implementations of that interface need to have the same signature (meaning same parameter list). There is really no way around that. –  Servy Apr 18 '12 at 14:18
2  
Potential dupe; stackoverflow.com/questions/6114519/… –  dash Apr 18 '12 at 14:18
    
Aside, "interface class" is contradictory; "interface type" or just "interface" would be better. –  phoog Apr 18 '12 at 14:23
    
What are the extra parameters? Would they be better suited to passing to the GooglePaymentProvider constructor? –  Rup Apr 18 '12 at 14:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Change your interface to use a PaymentParameters class that contains all the parameters each different service might need.

public interface IPayment 
{ 
   void MakePayment(PaymentParameters p);   
} 

public class PaymentParameters{
    public string A { get; set; }
    public int B { get; set; }
}

Your Google and PayPay implementations will use only the needed parameters from PaymentParameters.

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-_-' Never thought of that solution. –  Francis P Apr 18 '12 at 14:47
    
@FrancisP great minds think alike? :) I never got any of the "load new answers" notifications when I was typing this. For what its worth, I did upvote you. –  Brian Cauthon Apr 18 '12 at 15:03
    
Haha I didn't mind Brian, it happens! –  Francis P Apr 18 '12 at 15:09

A clean method could be to simply use a PaymentParameters class and use a single method called public void MakePayment(PaymentParameters params);

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1  
I wouldn't call that clean, quite the opposite. That parameter class would basically need to know ALL classes that implement IPayment to provide meaningful values to each implementation. –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 18 '12 at 14:20
1  
You could subclass it for each payment class, and each payment class would then have to check it's being passed the one it expects. You could implement this by having a 'create me a parameters class' method on the interface too, provided you can then dynamically fill it in based on the properties it has e.g. through your web framework. However I'm not sure I 100% like this. –  Rup Apr 18 '12 at 14:22
    
Well the default values can be defined by this class. Plus, the method becomes highly maintainable in the future.. –  Francis P Apr 18 '12 at 14:23
    
The main down site to this is that you'd have to either have un-used/un-populated values in PaymentParameters, or have child classes that have to be casted to ala (PayPalParameters) params. Either way it's not clean. And that's because things implementing an interface should have the same signatures.. which sucks in cases like this. –  smdrager Apr 18 '12 at 14:31

Well, the principe of the interface is to not know about the implementation. So the caller of the interface won't know if it is a Google of PayPay sub class and will always call the same method.

But if you have more complex parameters, you should use IPaymentParameters and a method with this prototype

public interface IPayment
{
     void MakePayment(IPaymentParameters parameters);
}

And two implementations GooglePayementParameters and PayPayPaymentParameters

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1  
The problem is that the caller needs to always pass the correct payment parameters, which means they need to know which class is implementing the interface, which defeats the purpose of using an interface. –  Servy Apr 18 '12 at 14:26
1  
well, it depends if you use injection and who instantiate who... it is a more complex situation that should be solved having the big picture of the design. –  Baptiste Pernet Apr 18 '12 at 14:52

Do your PayPay and Google classes represent the data necessary to describe a payment? Normally, a Payment class should represent a payment. If the class's job is to process payments, it should probably have a name like PaymentProcessor, and its interface something like IPaymentProcessor (or indeed IPaymentService, or something similar).

If the payment classes represent actual payments, then the class should not need any parameters to its MakePayment() method; instead, it would rely on the instance data to describe the payment being made.

Alternatively, you could have something like this (still using Payment to describe the payment itself):

interface IPaymentProcessor<T> where T : IPayment
{
    void ProcessPayment(T payment);
}
class PayPayPaymentProcessor : IPaymentProcessor<PayPay>
{
    void ProcessPayment(PayPay payment) { /* some implementation here */ }
}
class PayPayPaymentProcessor : IPaymentProcessor<Google>
{
    void ProcessPayment(Google payment) { /* some implementation here */ }
}

I would probably name the classes PayPayPayment and GooglePayment so the names more clearly represent the type:

class PayPayPaymentProcessor : IPaymentProcessor<PayPayPayment>
{
    void ProcessPayment(PayPayPayment payment) { /* some implementation here */ }
}
class PayPayPaymentProcessor : IPaymentProcessor<GooglePayment>
{
    void ProcessPayment(GooglePayment payment) { /* some implementation here */ }
}

Note that this is very similar to the approach other suggested of using a PaymentParameters class, but it adheres more closely to the single responsibility principle. In Brian Cauthon's answer, the PaymentParameters class has to hold the union of all possible parameters for any type of payment; here, the parameter types can (and should) be specific to the needs of the payment they represent.

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You can either define two interfaces, or use the following;

public interface IPayment
{
    void MakePayment(string a, int b=0);
}

When you only pass the string parameter, the method will set b to 0; you can just ignore it.

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If you use .NET 4.0 than you can give your Interface-Method default-values

public interface ITest{
void Function(stirng s1, string s2 = "");
}
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Straight from MSDN -

An interface contains only the signatures of methods, delegates or events

The signature of a method consists of the name of the method and the type and kind (value, reference, or output) of each of its formal parameters, considered in the order left to right

If you don't provide the implementation for the method (including the type and kind of each parameter), then you haven't really 'implemented' the Interface.

Good luck! :)

Glen

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