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I have the following two function template overloads:

template<typename T>
optional<T> some(const T& x)
{
    return optional<T>(x);
}

template<typename T>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_rvalue_reference<T&&>::value, optional<T> >::type
some(T&& x)
{
    return optional<T>(std::move(x));
}

My first attempt at unifying the overloads via perfect forwarding failed:

template<typename T>
optional<T> some(T&& x)
{
    return optional<T>(std::forward<T>(x));
}

error: forming pointer to reference type 'const std::basic_string<char>&'

As did my second attempt:

template<typename T>
optional<typename std::remove_reference<T>::type> some(T&& x)
{
    return optional<typename std::remove_reference<T>::type>(std::forward<T>(x));
}

error: no matching function for call to
'std::basic_string<char>::basic_string(gpa::optional<const std::basic_string<char> >)'

Is there a clean way to unify the overloads, or should I just live with having them?

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1  
You should provide a definition of what optional<> is. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 18 '12 at 15:40
    
It's basically a toy clone of boost::optional. –  fredoverflow Apr 18 '12 at 15:48
1  
... And yet the question stands, can you provide the definition? I have the feeling that the issue is with the interface of optional (i.e. perfect forwarding is the solution for some, you might need to tweak it to fit optional) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 18 '12 at 15:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In general, the best way to do this is to take the object by value and let the caller decide whether to copy or move it:

template<typename T>
optional<T> some(T x)
{
    return optional<T>(std::move(x));
}

If the caller calls it with a temporary or uses std::move on their value, then it's moved. Otherwise it's copied.

Yes, this does mean that you'll do one additional move (which, if movement is the same as copying, means doing two copies). If that's a significant performance problem for you, then you'll have to use the two overloads implementation.

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I'm not familiar with your optional, but perhaps you need to add:

typename remove_const< ... >::type

around your remove_reference in two places. (because your 1st overload of your 2-overload solution - which I assume is passing all of your tests - effectively does a remove_const when declaring optional<T>).

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Shouldn't that be remove_cv just to be on the safe side? –  pmr Apr 18 '12 at 18:51
1  
<shrug> If that's what is desired. The current 2-overload solution just rejects volatile-qualified lvalues. It is difficult for me to tell what is desired without a complete code example. –  Howard Hinnant Apr 18 '12 at 19:09

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