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In the official boost link below: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_35_0/doc/html/boost_asio/reference/deadline_timer.html .

You can see we can renew a async deadline_timer before it expires. That's fine, the code works: when timer got renewed, the old async_wait got cancelled that's fine but the annoy thing is when it's cancelled, it still called the handler :

void handler(const boost::system::error_code& error)
{
  if (!error)
  {
    // Timer expired.
  }
}

...

// Construct a timer with an absolute expiry time.
boost::asio::deadline_timer timer(io_service,
    boost::posix_time::time_from_string("2005-12-07 23:59:59.000"));

// Start an asynchronous wait.
timer.async_wait(handler);

Changing an active deadline_timer's expiry time

Changing the expiry time of a timer while there are pending asynchronous waits causes those wait operations to be cancelled. To ensure that the action associated with the timer is performed only once, use something like this: used:

void on_some_event()
{
  if (my_timer.expires_from_now(seconds(5)) > 0)
  {
    // We managed to cancel the timer. Start new asynchronous wait.
    my_timer.async_wait(on_timeout);
  }
  else
  {
    // Too late, timer has already expired!
  }
}

void on_timeout(const boost::system::error_code& e)
{
  if (e != boost::asio::error::operation_aborted)
  {
    // Timer was not cancelled, take necessary action.
  }
}

I am wondering is there way to renew & cancel the old timer without letting the old timer calling the handler, in this case the on_timeout() function?

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AFAICT, you answered your own question in the question itself? In the example from the docs that you copy-pasted, on_timeout already had the appropriate check? –  Rawler Apr 19 '12 at 16:42
    
Yea I didn't copy/paste code from there, I wrote my own that's why I didn't spot that in the 1st place, but I soon found it & added a answer below. But funny enough someone downvoted this lol –  Gob00st Apr 19 '12 at 16:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

My stupid question, just discoveried it can be fixed by adding one line check(see if it's a abort/cancel event) before doing actual stuff:

void handler1(const boost::system::error_code &e)
{
    if (e != boost::asio::error::operation_aborted) // here is the important part
        {
            //do actual stuff here if it's not a cancel/abort event
        }
}
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