Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote this funcion on a utils.py located on the app direcroty:

from bm.bmApp.models import Client

def get_client(user):
    try:
        client = Client.objects.get(username=user.username)
    except Client.DoesNotExist:
        print "User Does not Exist"
        return None
    else:       
        return client

def to_safe_uppercase(string):
    if string is None:
        return ''
    return string.upper()

Then when i use the function to_safe_uppercase on my models.py file, by importing it in this way:

from bm.bmApp.utils import to_safe_uppercase 

I got the python error:

     from bm.bmApp.utils import to_safe_uppercase
ImportError: cannot import name to_safe_uppercase

I got the solution for this problem when i change the import statement for:

from bm.bmApp.utils import *

But i can't understand why is this, why when i import the specific function i got the error?

share|improve this question
    
This should not happen. I suspect there is something else going on. –  Marcin Apr 18 '12 at 15:41
    
unfortunately, django by default catches ImportErrors and replaces them with this errormessage. try to patch django, so that it gives you the traceback, this should point to the problem. I suspect cyclic imports or something like that. –  ch3ka Apr 18 '12 at 15:46
    
@ch3ka patching django isn't a great idea... also he is getting the python traceback already. He's pasted part of it in the question –  Jiaaro Apr 18 '12 at 15:48
    
@Jiaaro not for production use, of course. And I don't think that's the full traceback, as said, django used to hide it (not sure it that's true for recent versions, though) But Mark spotted the Problem already anyways: as I suspected, it's a circular import. –  ch3ka Apr 18 '12 at 15:50

3 Answers 3

You are creating a circular import.

utils.py
from bm.bmApp.models import Client
# Rest of the file...

models.py
from bm.bmApp.utils import to_safe_uppercase
# Rest of the file...

I would suggest your refactor your code so that you don't have a circular dependency (i.e. utils should not need to import models.py or vice versa).

share|improve this answer
    
Why does it work then when the OP uses from ... import * ? –  jadkik94 Apr 18 '12 at 16:02
    
See docs.python.org/faq/… –  Mark Lavin Apr 18 '12 at 17:01
    
Thanks. You should consider adding something about it in your answer, it's part of the OP's question. :) –  jadkik94 Apr 18 '12 at 19:06
    
I've checking the link above, and it seems this get this problem: –  alacret Apr 19 '12 at 11:05

You are doing what is known as a Circular import.

models.py:

from bm.bmApp.utils import to_safe_uppercase

utils.py:

from bm.bmApp.models import Client

Now when you do import bm.bmApp.models The interpreter does the following:

  1. models.py - Line 1: try to import bm.bmApp.utils
  2. utils.py - Line 1: try to import bm.bmApp.models
  3. models.py - Line 1: try to import bm.bmApp.utils
  4. utils.py - Line 1: try to import bm.bmApp.models
  5. ...

The easiest solution is to move the import inside the function:

utils.py:

def get_client(user):
    from bm.bmApp.models import Client
    try:
        client = Client.objects.get(username=user.username)
    except Client.DoesNotExist:
        print "User Does not Exist"
        return None
    else:       
        return client

def to_safe_uppercase(string):
    if string is None:
        return ''
    return string.upper()
share|improve this answer

I'm not sure I can explain the Import error, but I have three ideas. First, your function needs tweaking. You've used a reserved word 'string' as an argument. Consider renaming.

Second, what happens if you invoke ./manage.py shell, and do the import by hand. Does it give you any different?

Third, try deleting your pyc files to force django to recompile python code (this one is a very long shot...but worth eliminating)

share|improve this answer
    
I thought it was str –  Jiaaro Apr 18 '12 at 15:46
    
It is str. but string is a module in the stdlib... –  ch3ka Apr 18 '12 at 15:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.