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I am following "The Art and Science of Java" book and it shows how to calculate a leap year. The book uses ACM Java Task Force's library.

Here is the code the books uses:

import acm.program.*;

public class LeapYear extends ConsoleProgram {
    public void run()
    {

        println("This program calculates leap year.");
        int year = readInt("Enter the year: ");     

        boolean isLeapYear = ((year % 4 == 0) && (year % 100 != 0) || (year % 400 == 0));

        if (isLeapYear)
        {
            println(year + " is a leap year.");
        } else
            println(year + " is not a leap year.");
    }

}

Now, this is how I calculated the leap year.

import acm.program.*;

public class LeapYear extends ConsoleProgram {
    public void run()
    {

        println("This program calculates leap year.");
        int year = readInt("Enter the year: ");

        if ((year % 4 == 0) && year % 100 != 0)
        {
            println(year + " is a leap year.");
        }
        else if ((year % 4 == 0) && (year % 100 == 0) && (year % 400 == 0))
        {
            println(year + " is a leap year.");
        }
        else
        {
            println(year + " is not a leap year.");
        }
    }
}

Is there anything wrong with my code or should i use the one provided by the book ?

EDIT :: Both of the above code works fine, What i want to ask is which code is the best way to calculate the leap year.

share|improve this question
    
Best code would be to use a trusted library instead. Cletus suggestion of using the Calendar class is a prime example hereof. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jun 20 '09 at 12:52
    
You are correct if Im using the regular Java library. But in my course, im using ACM's Java Task Force's library. www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~eroberts/jtf –  Ibn Saeed Jun 20 '09 at 13:06
1  
Here is similar thread. stackoverflow.com/questions/7395699/calculate-leap-year-in-java/… –  CharithJ Sep 13 '11 at 1:41
    
The method from the book is for the Gregorian Calendar, your method is just wrong (leap year every 400 years only?) and every four years would be for the Julian Calendar. –  Marco W. Nov 4 '13 at 18:18
    
if((year % 4 == 0 || year % 400 == 0) && year % 100 != 0){ println(year +" is leap year") } –  dipu Jun 18 '14 at 20:00

12 Answers 12

up vote 11 down vote accepted

They look the same to me, though note that this line in your code has some redundancy:

else if ((year % 4 == 0) && (year % 100 == 0) && (year % 400 == 0))

could be replaced by:

else if (year % 400 == 0)

If a number is a multiple of 400 then it's automatically also a multiple of 100 and 4.

share|improve this answer
1  
Correction, 4, not 4! :) –  Sev Jun 20 '09 at 9:57
    
Hah corrected to avoid confusion between (!) exclamation and the not operator ;) –  therefromhere Jun 20 '09 at 10:00
1  
@OP, once you make this modification, the "books" code as you put it and your code will become functionally identical. –  Sev Jun 20 '09 at 10:01
    
@therefromhere, I was more "concerned" about the confusion between exclamation and 4! (4 factorial) –  Sev Jun 20 '09 at 10:03
    
@Sev, you are correct :). –  Ibn Saeed Jun 20 '09 at 10:06

The correct implementation is:

public static boolean isLeapYear(int year) {
  Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
  cal.set(Calendar.YEAR, year);
  return cal.getActualMaximum(DAY_OF_YEAR) > 365;
}

But if you are going to reinvent this wheel then:

public static boolean isLeapYear(int year) {
  if (year % 4 != 0) {
    return false;
  } else if (year % 400 == 0) {
    return true;
  } else if (year % 100 == 0) {
    return false;
  } else {
    return true;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for using library code. I would suggestion adding a note on it is because that 400 is a multiplum of 100 that you test for 400 before 100 as opposed to the original code. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jun 20 '09 at 12:51
    
@cletus where is the DAY_OF_YEAR value passed to cal.getActualMaximum(); –  Olofu Mark Jun 20 '13 at 14:38
    
that line should be cal.getActualMaximum(cal.DAY_OF_YEAR); –  Olofu Mark Jun 20 '13 at 14:58
1  
+1 for @OlofuMark for pointing that out. but a minor change: it should be Calendar.getActualMaximum(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR); because DAY_OF_YEAR is a static member and therefore, should be accessed in a static way. =) –  PinoyCoder Aug 17 '13 at 6:11
2  
Even better - return new GregorianCalendar(year, 1, 1).isLeapYear(); –  David Wallace Nov 14 '14 at 12:52

I suggest you put this code into a method and create a unit test.

public static boolean isLeapYear(int year) {
    assert year >= 1583; // not valid before this date.
    return ((year % 4 == 0) && (year % 100 != 0)) || (year % 400 == 0);
}

In the unit test

assertTrue(isLeapYear(2000));
assertTrue(isLeapYear(1904));
assertFalse(isLeapYear(1900));
assertFalse(isLeapYear(1901));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, im only a beginner in Java Programming. I havent learned Unit Testing as yet. But thanks for the answer :) –  Ibn Saeed Jun 20 '09 at 9:59
    
If I were a lecturer, I'd teach unit testing first. In maths and engineering maths classes, it's normal practice to put the results back through the formulas to check them; unit testing is getting the computer to do the same thing for your program. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 20 '09 at 10:12
    
Im following Standfords Programming Methodology Video course, the lecturer is using The Art and Science of Java book to teach the methodology of programming rather than teach Java. Im on chapter 4 and still there is no topic on Unit Testing so far. –  Ibn Saeed Jun 20 '09 at 10:15
    
I am a little bit confused, why are years before 1583 not valid? –  jcw Jun 8 '13 at 17:04
1  
@jcw 1583 was the first year of the Gregorian Calendar. Different countries adopted it in different years, making year between 1583 and the year it was adopted more complicated. (A idea of how confusing it can be en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_30) In any case, it doesn't make sense to use the Gregorian Calendar before it was created. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 9 '13 at 7:28

Pseudo code from Wikipedia translated into the most compact Javaese...

(year % 400 == 0) || ((year % 4 == 0) && (year % 100 != 0))

share|improve this answer
    
nice coverage in simple code –  Ripon Al Wasim Jan 30 '13 at 4:31

It's almost always wrong to have repetition in software. In any engineering discipline, form should follow function, and you have three branches for something which has two possible paths - it's either a leap year or not.

The mechanism which has the test on one line doesn't have that issue, but generally it would be better to separate the test into a function which takes an int representing a year and returns a boolean representing whether or not the year is a leap year. That way you can do something with it other that print to standard output on the console, and can more easily test it.

In code which is known to exceed its performance budget, it's usual to arrange the tests so that they are not redundant and perform the tests in an order which returns early. The wikipedia example does this - for most years you have to calculate modulo 400,100 and 4, but for a few you only need modulo 400 or 400 and 100. This is a small optimisation in terms of performance ( at best, only one in a hundred inputs are effected ), but it also means the code has less repetition, and there's less for the programmer to type in.

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Thanks, your answer makes sense. –  Ibn Saeed Jun 20 '09 at 10:16

Most Efficient Leap Year Test:

if ((year & 3) == 0 && ((year % 25) != 0 || (year & 15) == 0))
{
    /* leap year */
}

This is an excerpt from my detailed answer at http://stackoverflow.com/a/11595914/733805

share|improve this answer
    
The above is also a good solution to find leap year –  Ripon Al Wasim Jan 30 '13 at 6:21
import javax.swing.*;
public class LeapYear {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
    int year;
String yearStr = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null, "Enter radius: " );

year = Integer.parseInt( yearStr );

boolean isLeapYear;
isLeapYear = (year % 4 == 0 && year % 100 != 0) || (year % 400 == 0);  

 if(isLeapYear){ 
JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Leap Year!"); 
 }  
 else{
JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Not a Leap Year!"); 
    }
    }
    }
share|improve this answer

This is what I came up with. There is an added function to check to see if the int is past the date on which the exceptions were imposed(year$100, year %400). Before 1582 those exceptions weren't around.

import java.util.Scanner;

public class lecture{


public static void main(String[] args) {
    boolean loop=true;
    Scanner console = new Scanner( System.in );
    while (loop){
        System.out.print( "Enter the year: " );

        int year= console.nextInt();
        System.out.println( "The year is a leap year: "+ leapYear(year) );
        System.out.print( "again?: " );
        int again = console.nextInt();
        if (again == 1){
            loop=false;
        }//if
    }
}
public static boolean leapYear ( int year){
    boolean leaped = false;
    if (year%4==0){
        leaped = true;
        if(year>1582){
            if (year%100==0&&year%400!=0){
                leaped=false;
            }
        }
    }//1st if
    return leaped;
}
} 
share|improve this answer
public static void main(String[] args)
{

String strDate="Feb 2013";
        String[] strArray=strDate.split("\\s+");        

        Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
        cal.setTime(new SimpleDateFormat("MMM").parse(strArray[0].toString()));
        int monthInt = cal.get(Calendar.MONTH);
        monthInt++;
        cal.set(Calendar.YEAR, Integer.parseInt(strArray[1]));          
        strDate=strArray[1].toString()+"-"+monthInt+"-"+cal.getActualMaximum(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);

        System.out.println(strDate);    



}
share|improve this answer
    import java.util.Scanner;

    public class LeapYear {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.print("Enter the year then press Enter : ");
        int year = input.nextInt();

        if ((year < 1580) && (year % 4 == 0)) {
            System.out.println("Leap year: " + year);
        } else {
            if ((year % 4 == 0) && (year % 100 != 0) || (year % 400 == 0)) {
                System.out.println("Leap year: " + year);
            } else {
                System.out.println(year + " not a leap year!");
            }

        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

boolean leapYear = ( ( year % 4 ) == 0 );

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2  
This is wrong. 1900 is not a leap year. –  Artemix Dec 6 '12 at 20:21
    
Only one condition mentioned above is not enough to identify a leap year. The above is wrong. So you have to apply more conditions answered by The Sphinc: (year % 400 == 0) || ((year % 4 == 0) && (year % 100 != 0)) –  Ripon Al Wasim Jan 30 '13 at 4:30
new GregorianCalendar().isLeapYear(year);
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