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I'm trying to set up a product that corresponds to a length of time (a newspaper subscription).

I'm having the clients use the Django Admin to add product types (various subscription lengths) but I can't find anything out there on what model object type I should use to store a value of time (like 52 weeks, 26 weeks, 1 week, etc.). I would want to be able to choose a length as either days or weeks, because some papers are weekly, others daily.

Right now my Product Model is:

class Product(models.Model):
    product_type = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    product_description = models.CharField(max_length=255)
    product_cost = models.DecimalField(decimal_places=2, max_digits=4)
    product_active = models.BooleanField()
    def get_absolute_url(self):
        return "/signup/%i/" % self.id
    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.product_type

Is there any way to make the product_type an object type that would let a user define a value of time?

Thanks,

Anthony

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think it'd be easier to just store two values, one numeric value and a choice for what the number represents.

duration = models.IntegerField()
duration_type = models.CharField(max_length=32, choices=[
    ("day", "Days"),
    ("week", "Weeks")])

Assuming you have a separate subscription model, you could then calculate the expiration in that model as a method:

class Subscription(models.Model):
    product = models.ForeignKey(Product)
    starts = models.DateField()
    def expires(self):
        from datetime import timedelta
        if self.product.duration_type == "day":
            days = self.product.duration
        elif self.product.duration_type == "week":
            days = self.product.duration * 7
        return self.starts + timedelta(days=days)
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So in this example, the duration object would just store a number. In the Django admin you'd just see a number box. Then the duration_type object would store a string, and the admin would just have two choices. Once I get to this point, how would I calculate when a subscription has expired? Can you perform calculations involving numbers and dates? And how would the string I store in duration_type be used to interact with a datetimeField? –  Anthony Roberts Apr 18 '12 at 17:01
    
I'm not sure I have your data model right, but if you have a separate Subscription that is responsible for the start/end of a particular purchase of a product, you could calculate expiration dates as a method on Subscription; see my edit. –  AdamKG Apr 18 '12 at 17:17
    
Thanks AdamKG, I'll get this plugged in and let you know how it works. I found surprisingly little about this topic for Django, so i really appreciate the lead. –  Anthony Roberts Apr 18 '12 at 17:32
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You could add some DateTime model fields describing the start and end of a subscription. you can create a method of your model that returns a timedelta by subtracting one datetime from the other

class Product(models.Model):
    product_type = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    product_description = models.CharField(max_length=255)
    product_cost = models.DecimalField(decimal_places=2, max_digits=4)
    product_active = models.BooleanField()

    subscription_start = models.DateTimeField()
    subscription_end = models.DateTimeField()

    def get_duration(self):
        # returns a timedelta
        return self.subscription_end - self.subscription_start

    def get_absolute_url(self):
        return "/signup/%i/" % self.id
    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.product_type

eg:

>> import datetime
>> d1 = datetime.datetime(1986,14,05,0,0,0)
>> d2 = datetime.datetime.now()
>> print d2 - d1
9471 days, 17:24:31

you can use that timedelta to do calculations in your views

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To make sure I am understanding you right, these two lines: subscription_start = models.DateTimeField() subscription_end = models.DateTimeField() –  Anthony Roberts Apr 18 '12 at 16:51
    
Sorry to repeat this response, but ... To make sure I am understanding you right, these two lines: 'subscription_start = models.DateTimeField()' 'subscription_end = models.DateTimeField()' Wont these lines show up in the Django admin as the calendar and time tools, allowing the admin to pick a specific date and time? I need to give the admin a way to pick a length of time that is tied to the datetimeField for the user sign-up, which is a variable. –  Anthony Roberts Apr 18 '12 at 17:05
    
To clarify, yes, this would create a date picker for the start, and one for the end in the admin form, utilising the nice Django Form elements. When saved the data could be retrieved as either the 2 datetimes, eg product.subscription_start or as a timedelta eg product.get_duration() Having access to a timedelta object means you can output it however you like at the view stage, keeping the model about data and the view about presentation. eg >>> from datetime import timedelta >>> d = timedelta(days=1) >>> (d.days, d.seconds, d.microseconds) –  errkk Apr 18 '12 at 20:42
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