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When you develop an ASP.NET application using the repository pattern, do each of your methods create a new entity container instance (context) with a using block for each method, or do you create a class-level/private instance of the container for use by any of the repository methods until the repository itself is disposed? Other than what I note below, what are the advantages/disadvantages? Is there a way to combine the benefits of each of these that I'm just not seeing? Does your repository implement IDisposable, allowing you to create using blocks for instances of your repo?

Multiple containers (vs. single)

Advantages:

  • Preventing connections from being auto-closed/disposed (will be closed at the end of the using block).
  • Helps force you to only pull into memory what you need for a particular view/viewmodel, and in less round-trips (you will get a connection error for anything you attempt to lazy load).

Disadvantages:

  • Access of child entities within the Controller/View is limited to what you called with Include()
  • For pages like a dashboard index that shows information gathered from many tables (many different repository method calls), we will add the overhead of creating and disposing many entity containers.
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Off Topic? Seriously? I could see closing as not constructive (though i'd argue against that as well, but certainly more accurate than "off Topic") –  Erik Funkenbusch Apr 18 '12 at 17:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are instantiating your context in your repository, then you should always do it locally, and wrap it in a using statement.

If you're using Dependency Injection to inject the context, then let your DI container handle calling dispose on the context when the request is done.

Don't instantiate your context directly as a class member, since this will not dispose of the contexts resources until garbage collection occurs. If you do, then you will need to implement IDipsosable to dispose the context, and make sure that whatever is using your repository properly disposes of your repository.

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You just have to dispose the repository class itself (and dispose the context in the Dispose method of the repo), then you can safely use the class with the context as member. He indicated this already in his question: "Does your repository implement IDisposable, allowing you to create using blocks for instances of your repo?" –  Slauma Apr 18 '12 at 18:23
    
@Mystere Great response - I am surprised I've never thought of using DI for this purpose even though it seems to be perfectly suited for it. Simple solution, thank you! –  Keith Apr 18 '12 at 18:57

I, personally, put my context at the class level in my repository. My primary reason for doing so is because a distinct advantage of the repository pattern is that I can easily swap repositories and take advantage of a different backend. Remember - the purpose of the repository pattern is that you provide an interface that provides back data to some client. If you ever switch your data source, or just want to provide a new data source on the fly (via dependency injection), you've created a much more difficult problem if you do this on a per-method level.

Microsoft's MSDN site has good information the repository pattern. Hopefully this helps clarify some things.

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Unfortunately, this means that Dispose does not get called on your context, which means you can have open database connections (plus a significant amount of memory in use) until the garbage collector gets around to cleaning it up. This is why you should always wrap your contexts in a using block so they get disposed of as quickly as possible. –  Erik Funkenbusch Apr 18 '12 at 17:46
    
@MystereMan - Good point, but how do you get around the other issue I brought up within my post? (Now you are responsible for setting it up for every single method which adds significant development/code overhead.) I personally have never seen it done any other way. (Doesn't mean I'm correct, but it makes me more skeptical.) –  JasCav Apr 18 '12 at 17:50
    
I don't understand your second problem. If you use dependency injection, you let the DI container handle calling dispose. Classes are designed differently if they're using DI versus instantiating their own objects. It may be more work to switch, but that's why you should start off with DI. –  Erik Funkenbusch Apr 18 '12 at 17:54
    
@MystereMan - Okay...I think that makes sense to me. (I, admittedly, always have a lot to learn about programming. Appreciate your patience.) –  JasCav Apr 18 '12 at 17:56

I disagree with all four points:

Preventing connections from being auto-closed/disposed (will be closed at the end of the using block).

In my opinion it doesn't matter if you dispose the context on method level, repository instance level or request level. (You have to dispose the context of course at the end of a single request - either by wrapping the repository method in a using statement or by implementing IDisposable on the repository class (as you proposed) and wrapping the repository instance in a using statement in the controller action or by instantiating the repository in the controller constructor and dispose it in the Dispose override of the controller class - or by instantiating the context when the request begins and diposing it when the request ends (some Dependency Injection containers will help to do this work).) Why should the context be "auto-disposed"? In desktop application it is possible and common to have a context per window/view which might be open for hours.

Helps force you to only pull into memory what you need for a particular view/viewmodel, and in less round-trips (you will get a connection error for anything you attempt to lazy load).

Honestly I would enforce this by disabling lazy loading altogether. I don't see any benefit of lazy loading in a web application where the client is disconnected from the server anyway. In your controller actions you always know what you need to load and can use eager or explicit loading. To avoid memory overhead and improve performance, you can always disable change tracking for GET requests because EF can't track changes on a client's web page anyway.

Access of child entities within the Controller/View is limited to what you called with Include()

Which is rather an advantage than a disadvantage because you don't have the unwished surprises of lazy loading. If you need to populate child entities later in the controller actions, depending on some condition, you could load them through additional repository methods (LoadNavigationProperty or something) with the same or even a new context.

For pages like a dashboard index that shows information gathered from many tables (many different repository method calls), we will add the overhead of creating and disposing many entity containers.

Creating contexts - and I don't think we are talking about hundreds or thousands of instances - is a cheap operation. I would call this a very theoretical overhead which doesn't play a role in practice.

I've used both approaches you mentioned in web applications and also the third option, namely to create a single context per request and inject this same context into every repository/service I need in a controller action. They all three worked for me.

Of course if you use multiple contexts you have to be careful to do all the work in the same unit of work to avoid attaching entities to multiple contexts which will lead to well know exceptions. It's usually not a problem to avoid this situations but requires a bit more attention, especially when processing POST requests.

I lately use contexts per request, because it is easier and I just don't see the benefit of having very narrow contexts and I see no reason to use more than one single unit of work for the whole request processing. If I would need multiple contexts - for whatever reason - I could always create specialized methods which act with their own context instead of the "default context" of the request.

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We're talking about a web application here, not a desktop app. A desktop app typically has plenty of resources and can leave contexts open for hours. A web app tends to need to free up resources as soon as possible because you don't know how much load the server will be under. Web apps have fundamentally different resource management requirements than desktop apps. –  Erik Funkenbusch Apr 18 '12 at 17:48
    
@MystereMan: Are you saying that a web process might free up resources used in a request before the request is even completely processed? I didn't say to leave a context (or multiple contexts) open for a time longer than a single request. I don't understand your critical remark. –  Slauma Apr 18 '12 at 17:58
    
If you put your context at the class level, then the context is not disposed when the request is done. Even though the request is no longer using it, it will still consume resources and possibly connections, until the garbage collection occurs. If you use DI to inject the context, then your DI container can call dispose at the end of the request, or if you instantiate the objects directly then you need to wrap it in a using statement to release resources as soon as you are done with it. –  Erik Funkenbusch Apr 18 '12 at 17:59
    
@MystereMan: I've added a long sentence in parentheses under the first point. I thought, it was clear because in the question it's even proposed to implement IDisposable for the repository class. Of course you have to do that when you instantiate the context as a member of the repository. –  Slauma Apr 18 '12 at 18:13
    
@Slauma A lot of interesting and valid points, though I must admit some of your arguments seem to lean toward you agreeing with some of the points I made, and not disagreeing on all levels, like you mention. –  Keith Apr 18 '12 at 18:56

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