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I don't understand why the compiler doesn't like this, here is and example of the problem:

class A
{
public:
    virtual void Expand() { }
    virtual void Expand(bool flag) { }
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    virtual void Expand() {
        A::Expand(true);
        Expand(true);
    }
};

When I try to compile this the A::Expand(true); compiles fine, but the non scoped Expand(true); gets this compiler error:

'B::Expand' : function does not take 1 arguments

share|improve this question
    
The best I can tell is that method hiding exists to prevent a programmer from thinking they are are using an overloaded version of a base classes method. But it seems like a bad thing to me. – Solx Apr 18 '12 at 17:15
    
possible duplicate of C++ override/overload problem – Bo Persson Apr 18 '12 at 18:34
up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's because besides overriding the base Expand(), you're also hiding the base Expand(bool).

When you introduce a member function in a derived class with the same name as a method from the base class, all base class methods with that name are hidden in the derived class.

You can fix this by either qualifying (as you have) or with the using directive:

class B : public A
{
public:
    using A::Expand;
    virtual void Expand() {
        A::Expand(true);
        Expand(true);
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
What is the hiding rule that makes it not visible? – Solx Apr 18 '12 at 16:59
    
@Solx the fact that they have the same name. – Luchian Grigore Apr 18 '12 at 17:00
    
Meta Question: How do I decide which answer to accept, both are acceptable, given that I guess I should accept the first answer supplied. – Solx Apr 18 '12 at 17:18
    
@Solx it has nothing to do with which one was first. A great answer might show up in a week, and if it's better, accept that one. – Luchian Grigore Apr 18 '12 at 17:18
    
@Solx: You are supposed to accept an answer which helps you solve the problem you posted in best possible way. – Alok Save Apr 18 '12 at 17:31

You don't need virtual methods for that behaviour. Methods in a derived class hide methods with the same name in the base class. So if you have any function named Expand in your derived class (even if it is an override of a virtual method from the base class), none of the base classes methods with the same name are visible, regardless of their signature.

You can make the base classes methods visible with using. For that you would add using A::Expand; to the definition of B:

class B : public A
{
public:
    using A::Expand;  
    virtual void Expand() { Expand(true); }
};
share|improve this answer
    
@LuchianGrigore: What are you trying to say? Your original answer wasn't much longer then mine. From my point of view you hadn't written the part about using when I added it to my answer either (of course that might be lack of reload on my part). Its not like there are lots of possible answers for this question... – Grizzly Apr 18 '12 at 17:14
    
Fair point, sorry about that. – Luchian Grigore Apr 18 '12 at 17:19

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