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I'm aware of this method:

stackoverflow.com/?id=stack

<?php 
   echo $_GET['id'];
   //output: stack
?>

But I would like to know how to get $_GET request if url is like this:

stackoverflow.com/?stack

<?php 
   echo ???
   //output: stack
?>

Notice that content after /? is dynamically changed.

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You should probably check out mod_rewrite, URL rewriting. –  Mārtiņš Briedis Apr 18 '12 at 17:14

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can get the whole query string (unparsed) with $_SERVER['QUERY_STRING']

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You can retrieve all values of $_GET like this:

<?php
foreach($_GET as $key => $value){
 // $key = 'stack';
 // $value = '';
}

However, you should know what values are possible in your application and code appropriately for them.

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@phihag, output from print_r($_GET) on .?stack = Array ( [stack] => ) –  bfrohs Apr 18 '12 at 17:26
    
Yup, sorry, screwed up the test. –  phihag Apr 18 '12 at 17:27

You can use $_SERVER to get a lot of information about the URL, like

$_SERVER['QUERY_STRING'];
$_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'];
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$_SERVER['QUERY_STRING'] contains the value you're looking for. Try:

<?php
echo $_SERVER['QUERY_STRING'];
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You can just go through contents of $_GET and see what's inside. In your case stack will be key with empty string as value.

Additionally you can use parse_url and check query key from results, which is the same as using $_SERVER['QUERY_STRING'] as described in other answers.

But maybe it would help more if you described what are you trying to achieve.

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<?php
$d = array_keys($_GET);
echo array_shift($d);
?>
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<?php
$key = 'stack';
echo array_key_exists( $key, $_GET ) ? $key : NULL;
?>

I just noticed your comment:

Notice that content after /? is dynamically changed.

If you just want to do something dynamically with whatever appears in the query string, then the other answers regarding looping over $_GET or accessing $_SERVER[ 'QUERY_STRING' ] might suit you better (really depends what you're doing). Another possibility for a situation like that is array_keys( $_GET )

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$_GET is empty for the request ?stack. Also, why would you default to NULL instead of ''? –  phihag Apr 18 '12 at 17:19
    
$_GET will not be empty for that request -- it will be populated with an element with key stack and value of empty string. "Also, why would you default to NULL instead of ''" -- it doesn't particularly matter in this case. NULL would be converted to string, in this case the empty string. –  JMM Apr 18 '12 at 17:24
    
Oops, you're totally right. I must have screwed up the test somehow. nevertheless, this variant does not work for key = 'x&y'; –  phihag Apr 18 '12 at 17:26
    
I'm not sure what you mean. For /?x&y, $_GET will be populated with 2 elements, with keys x and y and empty string values. If you want a key of x&y you'd have to percent encode the ampersand in the URL (assuming ampersand is the param separator, which is not a given). –  JMM Apr 18 '12 at 17:29
    
There are scenarios where you don't want to let php parse your query string. For example, you may want to allow multiple (identical) keys, or collect the whole query string to include it in an administration panel. –  phihag Apr 18 '12 at 17:34

It would be $_GET['stack'] with null value.

There is a superglobal $_GET array. I believe checking it out on php.net would help.

http://localhost/?stack

Code:

<?php
echo var_dump($_GET);

Output:

array(1) {
  ["stack"]=>
  string(0) ""
}
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