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procedure MyProc(Eval: Boolean);  
begin       
    if not Eval then  
        Exit;  
    /* do stuff */  
    /* do more stuff */
end;

OR

procedure MyProc(Eval: Boolean);  
begin  
   if Eval then  
      begin  
         /* do stuff */  
         /* do more stuff */  
      end;

  /* no Exit needed, but now we got what I think unpleasing code:
  having a indentation level and a begin-end statement */
end;
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closed as not constructive by Robert Harvey Dec 23 '11 at 7:44

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9  
Why don't you just do stuff and more stuff in your function and then put the if statement around the function call? Or am I missing something here? –  Thomas Owens Jun 20 '09 at 12:11
    
Tomas, you could have earned points... This comment is as good as an answer. And it has already been upvoted by a few... –  Peter Perháč Jun 20 '09 at 12:39
    
Thaks Thomas by formmating! Well, I Know it breaks the cohesion, but let's say the two stufs handles two very diferents domains, so we can't lock it into a new function. –  Gedean Dias Jun 20 '09 at 13:02
    
Thomas please post as an answer. –  Toby Allen Jun 20 '09 at 15:37
    
Posted as an answer, by popular demand. –  Thomas Owens Jun 20 '09 at 16:16

9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Can I just make a plea that if you do use the second form, you don't add a gratuitous ectra level of indentation. So insrtead of:

procedure MyProc(Eval: Boolean);  
begin  
   if Eval then  
      begin  
         /* do stuff */  
         /* do more stuff */  
      end;

  /* no Exit needed, but now we got what I think unpleasing code:
  having a indentation level and a begin-end statement */
end;

say:

procedure MyProc(Eval: Boolean);  
begin  
   if Eval then  
   begin  
      /* do stuff */  
      /* do more stuff */  
   end;

  /* no Exit needed, but now we got what I think unpleasing code:
  having a indentation level and a begin-end statement */
end;
share|improve this answer
    
No criticism was intended. The point is that lots of people do use unecessary indentation levels, and it is a major pain. There is a very horrible C imndenetation style which is somewhat similar to the first example and needs to be stomped on. –  anon Jun 20 '09 at 17:41
    
@Neil Butterworth: Wow man, it was a formmating mistake, sorry about that. I'm not fully skilled with the answer editor as well as my english, but anyway we have to ident the /* do stuff / and / do more stuff * –  Gedean Dias Jun 20 '09 at 17:42

There are cases when either method is appropiate. Typically, however, the first offers more readable code and better control flow. I'm not very familiar with Delphi programming, but in C# I always try to use the former when possible. By the look of it, I see no reason that the approach should differ in Delphi.

To list a few of the advantages:

  • No need to indent subsequent code.
  • Easier to extend to multiple conditions. (Just add additional if statements rather than logical operators, which makes things clearer IMO.)
  • The idea that you are "opting out" of the method rather than opting in is more aesthetically pleasing, since the following code should be executed in the "normal" case.

Still, there are situations where the second option is more appropiate. In particular, when the method needs to be broken into sub-sections (though this is often a sign that you need to refactor).

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I think this is a matter of preference. However if you have a number of checks which you must perform before doing the 'real work' then the first form (IMO) looks tidier, and is easier to follow the flow. For example:

procedure MyProc(Eval: Boolean);
begin
    if not Eval then
        Exit;
    if not Eval2 then
        Exit;
    /* do stuff */
    /* do more stuff */ 
end;

v.s.

procedure MyProc(Eval: Boolean);
begin
    if Eval then
    begin
        if Eval2 then
        begin
            /* do stuff */
            /* do more stuff */
        end;
    end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
The second example isn't the best, since you can use logical operators to simplify it. –  Noldorin Jun 20 '09 at 12:23
    
@Noldorin: Fair point, but I didn't want to over-complicate the example. However you can imagine scenarios where 'Eval2' is a more complex sequence of statements which couldn't be trivially combined with the 'Eval' check. –  DaveR Jun 20 '09 at 12:31
    
Yeah, that's fair enough. I still very much agree with your general point. –  Noldorin Jun 20 '09 at 12:44

There are those that will argue you should only have one exit point in your function but I'm not in that camp.

I frequently use multi-returns and it doesn't affect the readability of short well-thought-out functions so I'd say just go for whatever you think is the more readable.

I've had people refactor code I've written to follow the "rules" and it's almost always ended up with a morass of unreadable code due mostly to excessive indentation. They should have either left it alne or done it properly, breaking it into more functions.

One particular annoyance I see is the likes of the "else" in:

if (some condition)
    return false;
else
    keep going;

Do they think the flow of control is somehow going to escape from the "then" clause?

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I agree that codestyle is often overdone. –  Marco van de Voort Jun 20 '09 at 14:54

I use the first form a lot. It is a bit literal programming of pre conditions, specially because when code is inserted between the actual checks in the second example, the exact conditions are less clear.

I do try to limit EXIT use to the first condition check part of the procedure though, to avoid too much spaghetti, but I think the first form is cleaner than the hoops to jump to preserve that one exit point.

And it seems to be used a lot, considering the fact that exit(returnvalue) was added in D2009 (and FPC having it for a decade)

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I prefer:

if not Eval then Exit;

because the code looks cleaner that way.

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I think the less exit points a code segment has the better so it's easier to read and understand. Noting is worse than debugging someone else's 100 line function and discovering there are 12 different situations peppered inside of it that can cause it to return early.

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@Hardwareguy: I fully agree whith you. A code artifact must have just only one exit point, for when things goes wrong, we got exception raising. –  Gedean Dias Jun 20 '09 at 17:31

The reality is this is too simple an example to prevaricate on. You'll choose your approach based on your existing convention -- and this example is too straightforward to make a decision on convention. What's more interesting is what to do with multiple get-out-now options and nested IF statements - it's a real grey area.

So what is my convention? Ah... I am pragmatic, I don't have any rules. If it's possible to jump out the window in the first few lines, I take it, because I don't have to remember whenever I edit the code that some "unrequited function call" could still be live at any point during the function.

Over time this function will be moulded and kneaded by bugs and enhancements. You are more likely to introduce a new bug with the latter approach than the former, because the quick-exit is obvious at the start, in your face, and you don't need to worry about it "forgotten" 50 lines down the function. In my bug-introducing experience, of course.

This is a more tricky call if you set things up and have to tear them down as jumping out can force you to juggle 17 Schrodinger's cat states in your head when making changes.

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I think a dozen nested if statements usually means cohesion-less code, so we got to refactor it, at least to be more readable. –  Gedean Dias Jun 20 '09 at 13:58
1  
"a more tricky call if you set things up and have to tear them down as jumping out can force you to..." - no, not really. Since exceptions can cause code to exit prematurely anyway, the tearing down has to be coded using finally or automatic reference counting. If it works properly with exceptions it will work with exit as well. –  mghie Jun 20 '09 at 14:19
    
mghie -- true only if the exit via an exception, and I don't like to use exceptions to model every code exit, plus my "tearing down" didn't necessarily mean objects. also depends whether your language has exceptions - e.g. vba users are a bit short-changed on this. I know the question is Delphi, but it works as a general question which is how I approached it. I also have to work in another environment which has no exceptions and poor function support, so I deal with this all the time. I don't have a hard fast rule - just implement what seems right at the time. –  Joel Goodwin Jun 20 '09 at 19:57
1  
@goodgai - "true only if the exit via an exception". Finally catches Exit's - try it. –  Uli Gerhardt Jun 22 '09 at 8:19
    
You're absolutely right. This is a valid approach to managing resources across multiple exit conditions (in a language that supports it!). –  Joel Goodwin Jun 22 '09 at 16:47

In my opinion, neither is the correct answer.

The correct solution would be to only include the "do stuff" and "do more stuff" portions in the procedure. Then, wrap the procedure call in an if statement, only calling it when necessary.

If, as you say in your comment, that "do stuff" and "do more stuff" cover two different domains, then perhaps you want two procedures - one to "do stuff" and another to "do more stuff". If you perform both of the procedures together often enough, you can also include a third procedure that simply calls the other two procedures.

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@Thomas: Makes sense! But sometimes, we got so complex stuff that's seems good to encapsusale it in a lot of small pieces like procedures, functions or "queries", but in other hand it seems worse to granulating it too deep, even if this way it brokens the cohesion rule. –  Gedean Dias Jun 20 '09 at 17:25
    
As long as the code isn't so granular that it becomes difficult to understand, it's perfectly fine. Also, a single function should never perform two distinct tasks. –  Thomas Owens Jun 21 '09 at 3:45

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