Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following JavaScript:

function b() {
    alert(arguments.caller[0]);
}

function X(x) {
    this.x = x;
}

X.prototype.a = function(i) {
    b();
}

new X(10).a(5);

This will show the message "5". However, I want to show "10", i.e. in the function b I want to access the "this" property of the caller. Is this possible, and how?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You could pass the caller as an argument to the function:

function b(caller) {
    alert(caller.x);
};

function X(x) {
    this.x = x;
};

X.prototype.a = function(i) {
    b(this);
};

new X(10).a(5);

Note that arguments.caller is deprecated in JS 1.3 and removed in JS 1.5.

share|improve this answer
function b() {
    alert(this.x);
}

function X(x) {
    this.x = x;
}

X.prototype.a = function(i) {
    b.call(this); /* <- call() used to specify context */
}

new X(10).a(5);
share|improve this answer

You are introducing a level of indirection by wrapping the call to function b inside an anonymous function. If possible, you should directly set it.

function b() {
  alert(this.x);  // 10
  alert(arguments[0]); // 5
}

function X(x) {
  this.x = x; /* alternatively, set this.x = arguments to capture all arguments*/
}

X.prototype.a = b;

new X(10).a(5);

Otherwise, you would need to pass the object, which can be done in either of the ways J-P or balpha suggested.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.