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I want to erase some iterator from a vector, so this is what I have now.

void function(std::vector <class*> & vector)
{
    std::vector <class*>::iterator it;
    for(it = vector.begin(); iter != vector.end(); ++iter)
        {
            if(it->value == 1)
                vector.erase(it);
        }
    Display(vector);
    return;
}

Apparently this code gives me an error when the iterator got removed is the last one in the vector, otherwise seems it's working fine. I know it might not be desirable behavior to modify vector inside such a loop, but if I have to do this, what will be the best way?

Thanks.

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Try to use it = vector.erase(it), but make sure not to increment it when assigned from the erase function, because otherwise you will skip items –  Tom Knapen Apr 18 '12 at 19:00
    
The standard library does not guarantee that iterators are valid when the collection is changed in any way. The good news is that there are always ways to deal with this, and usually in a more concise way, e.g. see Ylisar's answer. –  Codie CodeMonkey Apr 18 '12 at 19:05
    
@DeepYellow: The standard does give some guarantees for some operations on some containers; in this case, it guarantees that iterators and references to elements before the erase point remain vaild. Obviously, iterators and references to the erased element will always be invalidated, for any container. –  Mike Seymour Apr 18 '12 at 19:12
    
Thanks for replying, I think I went through this issue. After the erasing, my ++iter seems not working. Anything I can do about it? –  Derek Apr 19 '12 at 0:00
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
for (it = vector.begin(); it != vector.end(); )
{
    if (it->value == 1)
        it = vector.erase(it);
    else
        ++it;
}

But for this case, you should actually just use std::remove_if with an appropriate predicate.

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Thanks for replying. I tried your way, but somehow I don't know why after the erase happens, the '++it' doesn't increment the iterator. –  Derek Apr 18 '12 at 23:55
    
@Derek: I'm not clear on what you are saying there. With the code I gave, when an element is erased, I don't increment the iterator. Instead, I set it to the return value of the erase function, which is the next element after the erased one(which is now in the position that the erased one formerly occupied). So I don't know what you mean by your statement. Please clarify. –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 19 '12 at 0:16
    
My fault for being not clear. The erase goes well and iterator will be returned as the next element. But in the next cycle of the for loop, ++it is executed but I found the iterator is not incremented after that. –  Derek Apr 19 '12 at 0:36
    
@Derek: How did you determine that the iterator is not incremented? Could you show your current code along with a description of what you expect to be happening compared to what is actually happening(or what appears to be happening)? –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 19 '12 at 18:02
    
I monitored the address change of the it pointer. It incremented well to every element address in the vector, but once the erase happened, after it reaches the last element, the next time the address won't change. What's more weird, it ran into exception in the next loop. Might be Visual Studio debugging issue, I'm not sure. –  Derek Apr 19 '12 at 21:35
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Another approach:

vector.erase( std::remove_if( vector.begin(), vector.end(), boost::bind( &class::value, _1 ) == 1 ), vector.end() );

boost::bind can probably be replaced by std::bind if it's available.

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1  
std::bind does not support operator== in this fashion -- that's a Boost extension. –  ildjarn Apr 18 '12 at 19:30
    
Ah, that's good to know :) –  Ylisar Apr 19 '12 at 16:48
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It's bad idea to erase from vector while iterate over it. Simply filter it.

void function(std::vector <class*> & vector)
{
    std::vector <class*>::iterator from= vector.begin();
    std::vector <class*>::iterator to= from;
    for(; from != vector.end(); ++from)
        {
            if((*from)->value == 1) continue; 
            // it should be (*from) or use boost::ptr_vector
            *(to++)=*from;
        }
    vector.erase( to, vector.end() );
    Display(vector);
    return;
}

This is functionality exactly identical as code by Ylisar. IMHO this is best for vector, if you always have something to remove, but if remove is very rare (for whole one vector), use Benjamin Lindley version.

Whatever optimization may be, you may filter only if it you have something to erase:

void function(std::vector <class*> & vector)
{
   std::vector <class*>::iterator to= vector.begin(); 
   for(; to != vector.end(); ++to)
   {
      if((*to)->value == 1) 
      {
         std::vector <class*>::iterator from=to;
         for(++from; from != vector.end(); ++from)
         {
            if((*from)->value == 1) continue;
            *(to++)=*from;
         }
         vector.erase( to, vector.end() );
         break;
      }
    }
    Display(vector);
    return;
}

If you don't need to preserve order, you may copy from back to minimal copy overheat:

void function(std::vector <class*> & vector)
{
   std::vector <class*>::iterator to= vector.begin(); 
   std::vector <class*>::iterator from=vector.end();
   if(to == from) return;
   for(;;)
   {
      if((*to)->value == 1) // need skip value from begin
      {
         for( --from; from != to; --from)
         {
            if((*from)->value == 1) continue; // need skip value from end
            *to=*from;
            ++to; // copied, move to next
         }
      } 
      else 
      {
         ++to; //preserved, move to next
      }
      if(to == from) 
      {
         vector.erase( to, vector.end() ); 
         break;
      }
    }
    Display(vector);
    return;
}
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