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I'm trying to match a string, starting with a dot using java's matches method. Why this doesn't work:

".why?".matches("\\.*");

When I use a single slash, i'm getting an error for invalid escape sequence. Thanks in advance

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

"\\.*" matches a string consisting of zero or more '.'s. It matches the following (quoted) strings:

""
"."
".."
"..."

(and so on)

You want: "\\..*" instead. Note that . by default does not match line breaks, so it wouldn't match the following string:

".Why? \n Not!"

For such string to be matched, you need to enable DOT-ALL: "(?s)\\..*"

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Now it works, thanks, but why i need the second dot –  azlisum Apr 18 '12 at 19:27
    
@Colin, no, the extra backslash is only there because it's placed inside a string literal in Java. So the string-pattern "\\." is equivalent to the regex-pattern: \. (note the double quotes!) –  Bart Kiers Apr 18 '12 at 19:29
    
It might be worth explaining that what you mean is that \\.* is true for ".", "..", "...", ... while \\..* is true for ".", ".anything", ".etc",... the \\. being . the second . being anycharacter and the * being repeat that anycharacter rule infinitely. –  Robert Louis Murphy Apr 18 '12 at 19:31
    
@azlisum, the "\\." matches the dot at the start of the string, and then .* matches the rest of the input (but no line breaks). –  Bart Kiers Apr 18 '12 at 19:31
    
@RobertLouisMurphy, expanded my explanation a bit. Note that . does not match anything though: it doesn't match line-break chars. –  Bart Kiers Apr 18 '12 at 19:33

Just tried it myself. This works for me

System.out.println(".why?".matches("^\\..*"));

You where just missing one "." to match the "why?" part.

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