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I have a SQL SELECT statement which will not be known until runtime, which could contain JOIN's and inner selects. I need to determine the names and data types of each of the columns of the returned result of the statment from within C#. I am inclined to do something like:

string orginalSelectStatement = "SELECT * FROM MyTable";

string selectStatement = string.Format("SELECT TOP 0 * FROM ({0}) s", orginalSelectStatement);
SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(@"MyConnectionString");
SqlDataAdapter adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(selectStatement, connection);

DataTable table = new DataTable();
adapter.Fill(table);

foreach (DataColumn column in table.Columns)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Name: {0}; Type: {1}", column.ColumnName, column.DataType);
}

Is there a better way to do what I am trying to do? By "better" I mean either a less resource-intensive way of accomplishing the same task or a more sure way of accomplishing the same task (i.e. for all I know the code snippet I just gave will fail in some situations).

SOLUTION: First of all, my TOP 0 hack is bad, namely for something like this:

SELECT TOP 0 * FROM (SELECT 0 AS A, 1 AS A) S

In other words, in a sub-select, if two things are aliased to the same name, that throws an error. So it is out of the picture. However, for completeness sake, I went ahead and tested it, along with the two proposed solutions: SET FMTONLY ON and GetSchemaTable.

Here are the results (in milliseconds for 1,000 queries, each):

Schema Time: 3130

TOP 0 Time: 2808

FMTONLY ON Time: 2937

My recommendation would be GetSchemaTable since it's more likely to be future-proofed by a removal of the SET FMTONLY ON as valid SQL and it solves the aliasing problem, even though it is slightly slower. However, if you "know" that duplicate column names will never be an issue, then TOP 0 is faster than GetSchemaTable and is more future-proofed than SET FMTONLY ON.

Here is my experimental code:

int schemaTime = 0;
int topTime = 0;
int fmtOnTime = 0;

SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(@"MyConnectionString");
connection.Open();

SqlCommand schemaCommand = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM MyTable", connection);
SqlCommand topCommand = new SqlCommand("SELECT TOP 0 * FROM (SELECT * FROM MyTable) S", connection);
SqlCommand fmtOnCommand = new SqlCommand("SET FMTONLY ON; SELECT * FROM MyTable", connection);

for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
    {
        DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
        using (SqlDataReader reader = schemaCommand.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.SchemaOnly))
        {
            DataTable table = reader.GetSchemaTable();
        }
        DateTime stop = DateTime.Now;
        TimeSpan span = stop - start;
        schemaTime += span.Milliseconds;
    }

    {
        DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

        DataTable table = new DataTable();
        SqlDataAdapter adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(topCommand);
        adapter.Fill(table);

        DateTime stop = DateTime.Now;
        TimeSpan span = stop - start;
        topTime += span.Milliseconds;
    }

    {
        DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

        DataTable table = new DataTable();
        SqlDataAdapter adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(fmtOnCommand);
        adapter.Fill(table);

        DateTime stop = DateTime.Now;
        TimeSpan span = stop - start;
        fmtOnTime += span.Milliseconds;
    }
}

Console.WriteLine("Schema Time: " + schemaTime);
Console.WriteLine("TOP 0 Time: " + topTime);
Console.WriteLine("FMTONLY ON Time: " + fmtOnTime);

connection.Close();
share|improve this question
    
Not sure about TOP 0, I will try with WHERE 1=0, but the best is if you know the primary key and put a WHERE PK=an_impossible_value –  Steve Apr 18 '12 at 19:43
    
I thought I remember reading once that SQL Server optimizes TOP 1 queries, so I figured it may do that for TOP 0 queries, as well. –  Words Like Jared Apr 18 '12 at 19:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could use GetSchemaTable to do what you want.

There is an example of how to use it here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the reply! Why would I use this over what I am currently doing, or Icarus' SET FMTONLY ON approach? –  Words Like Jared Apr 18 '12 at 19:47
    
I don't know that there's a specific benefit using GetSchemaTable (in fact, that method may be doing something similar to what the other answerers suggested). It's just one way of doing it. However, I'd assume that it'd work regardless of the database connection, so that's one possible benefit. –  Michael Todd Apr 18 '12 at 19:50
1  
I just ran a SQL profile on SQL Server 2008 on the GetSchemaTable method and here's what it did: SET FMTONLY OFF; SET NO_BROWSETABLE ON; SELECT * FROM [MyTable] SET NO_BROWSETABLE OFF; I am still looking into NO_BROWSETABLE to see what it does. –  Words Like Jared Apr 18 '12 at 20:01

If using SQL Server, I would try using SET FMTONLY ON

Returns only metadata to the client. Can be used to test the format of the response without actually running the query.

Apparently on SQL Server 2012, there's a better way. All is specified in the linked MSDN article.

BTW, this technique is what LINQ To SQL uses internally to determine the result set returned by a stored procedure, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the reply! If this is what LINQ To SQL uses, then I am inclined to think this may be the most efficient method. Could you (briefly) give any explanation of this compares to what I'm doing or the GetSchemaTable approach? –  Words Like Jared Apr 18 '12 at 19:49
    
@WordsLikeJared I just read a link regarding NO_BROWSETABLE (I didn't know about this option) but it seems that it actually executes the statement. FMTONLY ON will not execute the statement; therefore, I would assume is far more efficient. –  Icarus Apr 18 '12 at 20:07
    
It (SET FMTONLY ON) by itself actually seemed to perform slower than GetSchemaTable, consistently, in my experiments, which, along with the latter being more future proofed, more likely, is the reason I chose it as the answer to my question and not yours. You did get an up-vote, of course, though :) –  Words Like Jared Apr 19 '12 at 14:35

Dynamic SQL is always a bit of a minefield, but you could the SET FMTONLY ON on your query - this means the query will only return Metadata, the same as if no results were returned. So:

string selectStatement = string.Format("SET FMTONLY ON; {0}", orginalSelectStatement);

Alternatively, if you aren't tied to ADO, could you not go down the Linq-to-SQL route and generate a data context which will map out all of your database schemas in to code and their relevant types? You could also have a look at some of the Micro ORMs out there, such as Dapper.Net

There are plenty of other ORMs out there too.

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