Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

how to extract this string using regular expression

||03/15/2012||10:17:11|FOR TEST

I want to extract "03/15/2012" . I have tried this command

my $firstLine =~ m/^\|\|\d{2}\/\d{2}\/\d{4}\|\|/i ;
trace("first line extraction : $firstLine first $1");

It doesn't work. could you please help ?

thanks

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to use a capturing group () around the part you want to extract:

my $line = '||03/15/2012||10:17:11|FOR TEST';
if ($line =~ m/^\|\|(\d{2}\/\d{2}\/\d{4})\|\|/i) {
  # Capturing group ┴───────────────────┘
  print("Group 1: $1\n"); # 03/15/2012
}
share|improve this answer
    
correct. but why I can't do an assignment, like my $data = $1 –  user595234 Apr 18 '12 at 20:16
    
my mistake. please ignore –  user595234 Apr 18 '12 at 20:21

You can assign the value of the a capturing group directly like this:

my $in = "||03/15/2012||10:17:11|FOR TEST";
(my $Date) = $in =~ /^\|\|(\d{2}\/\d{2}\/\d{4})\|\|/;

You will find the result of the capturing group 1 in $Date.

Btw. you don't need the modifier i, because this makes letters matching case insensitive, since you have no letters in your regex, this option is useless.

share|improve this answer

Script:

my $firstLine = '||03/15/2012||10:17:11|FOR TEST';
print $1 if $firstLine =~ /(\d{2}\/\d{2}\/\d{4})/;

Output:

03/15/2012

Test this code here: http://ideone.com/99iUg

share|improve this answer
    
If the line always starts with || followed by date, then you can replace regex /(\d{2}\/\d{2}\/\d{4})/ with this one: /^\|{2}(\d{2}\/\d{2}\/\d{4})/. –  Ωmega Apr 18 '12 at 20:15

Try: my $firstLine =~m/^\|\|(.+)\|\|.*$/i

You only really care about what's between the first two sets of double pipes

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.