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I know off the bat some of you will assume Interface or Abstract, but that only handles SOME of the situations. Here's an example where they break.

Assume we have classes that implement the same interface and extend the same base

  class car extends fourwheeler implements ipaygas{       

    protected $tank1;

    //interface
    public function payGas($amount){}

  }

  class sportscar extends fourwheeler implements ipaygas{

    protected $tank1;
    protected $tank2;

    //interface
    public function payGas($amount){}

  }

  interface ipaygas{

    function payGas($amount);
  }

In some situations an interface is all you need as you may only want to execute 'payGas()'. But what do you do when you have conditions to be met.

Example, what if - before paying gas you need to (1) check the car type, (2) use premium gas for the sports car, and (3) fill the second tank of the sports car.

THIS IS WHAT I WANT TO DO BUT CANNOT

   function pumpAndPay(iPayGas $car){
     if(gettype($car) == "car"){
       fillTank($car,(car) $car->tank1);
     }else{
       fillTank($car,(sportscar) $car->tank1);
       fillTank($car,(sportscar) $car->tank2);
     }
   }

How can I do this with real type casting? Is it possible in PHP?

Update (Based on responses): In my 'real' case... imagine I have to check various Vehicle types, each with different paint, body, interior, gas_type, cleaner_type, color, etc...

   abstract class AVechicle{}
   abstract class ACar extends AVechicle{}
   abstract class ATruckOrSUV extends AVechicle{}
   abstract class ABike extends AVechicle{}

   class Car extends ACar{}
   class SportsCar extends ACar{}
   class SUV extends ATruckOrSUV{}
   class Truck extends ATruckOrSUV{}
   class Bike extends ABike{}
   class Scooter extends ABike{}

   class GasStation{

     public function cleanVehicle(AVehicle $car){
       //assume we need to check the car type to know
       //what type of cleaner to use and how to clean the car
       //if the car has leather or bucket seats

       //imagine we have to add an extra $2/h for sports cars

       //imagine a truck needs special treatment tires
       //or needs inspection
     }

     public function pumpAndPay(AVehicle $car){
       //need to know vehicle type to get gas type

       //maybe we have a special for scooters only, Green Air campaign etc.
     }

     public function fullService(AVehicle $car){
       //need to know if its a truck to do inspection FIRST

       $this->cleanVehicle($car);
       $this->pumpAndPay($car);

       //bikes get 10% off
       //cars get free carwash
     }

   }

Interfaces and abstracts alone will only go so far...

share|improve this question
    
Those var tank1; declarations should be protected $tank1; - the dollar sign is required, and you should get into the habit of hiding them with private or protected. Use a getter in each to access it, and as @dan-lee says, fillTank should probably be an instance method. – halfer Apr 18 '12 at 20:40
    
Also, it looks like you're trying to recast the tank variables in your example, although I expect that's not what you want. You can do a pretend recast by creating a method to instantiate a new instance of a particular class, and copying the common data from one to the other, but I don't think you need that here anyway. – halfer Apr 18 '12 at 20:44
    
@halfer Sorry about the variables... I did that quickly. I understand what you mean by copying the data, but thats excess operations (read classA, grab classA props, copy props to classB) when true casting will give me the values. – Reshape Media Apr 19 '12 at 5:56
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Short answer to your question, no you cannot recast an object to another object.

However, Dan Lee's response is a good one and close to what I am suggesting. Why not make the fillTank an attribute of a vehicle object, this way all objects extending the vehicle class will know how to fill their own tanks. Something like this:

abstract class Vehicle
{
    protected $tank1;
    protected $tank2;

    // Declaring an abstract function in parent class forces all child class to 
    // implement same class
    abstract public function fillGas() {}
}

class Car extends Vehicle
{
    public function fillGas()
    {
        $this->tank1 = 'full';
    }
}

class SportsCar extends Vehicle
{
    public function fillGas()
    {
        $this->tank1 = 'full';
        $this->tank2 = 'full';
    }
}

class Skateboard extends Vehicle
{
    // Skateboards don't have gastanks, just here to sastify parent abstract definition
    public function fillGas() {}
}

Of course the big fallacy with your OP is that you are assuming that ALL sportscars have two gas tanks, when in fact this not the case. Only certain sportscars have multiple gas tanks.

Another approach is to take a look at traits (available as of PHP 5.4). It appears you can enforce interface as well as implementation across objects which do not extend the same class.

-- Update --

Update (Based on responses): In my 'real' case... imagine I have to check various Vehicle types, each with different paint, body, interior, gas_type, cleaner_type, color, etc...

All these attributes you mention are Vehicle attributes, not gastation, fillingstation, parkinglot etc attributes, as such I would add all these attributes to the vehicle class, then you can pass a vehicle to a GasStation::cleanVehicle() factory method to manipulate the vehicle attributes.

The code snippet below is DEMONSTRATIVE only, demonstrating how aforementioned attributes should be attached to the vehicle class, and how the GasStation class can manipulate vehicle attributes based on the class of vehicle. I wrote the following in 5 minutes, but it's obvious that it will take more thought to properly handle the factory method and whether to pass off to other objects etc. Consider the following:

abstract class Vehicle
{
    // Setting these to public for demonstration only, otherwise you should set these 
    //  to protected and write public accessors 
    public $paintType;
    public $bodyType;
    public $interior;
}

class Car extends Vehicle
{
}

class Suv extends Vehicle
{
}

class Truck extends Vehicle
{
}

class GasStation
{
    public static function cleanVehicle(Vehicle $vehicle)
    {
        switch (get_class($vehicle)) {

            case 'Car':
                // Car specific cleaning
                break;

            case 'Truck':
                // Truck specific cleaning
                break;

            default:
                throw new Exception(sprintf('Invalid $vehicle: %s', serialize($vehicle)));
        }

        // We've gone through our vehicle specific cleaning, now we can do generic
        if ('Leather' === $vehicle->getInterior()) {
            // Leather specific cleaning
        }

        if ('Sedan' === $vehicle->getBodyType()) {
            // Sedan specific cleaning
        }
    }
 }

$car = new Car();

$car->setPaintType = 'Glossy';
$car->setBodyType = 'Sedan';
$car->setInterior = 'Cloth';

$suv = new Suv();

$suv->setPaintType = 'Glossy';
$suv->setBodyType = 'Crossover';
$suv->setInterior = 'Leather';

$truck = new Truck();

$truck->setPaintType = 'Flat';
$truck->setBodyType = 'ClubCab';
$truck->setInterior = 'Cloth';

$vehicles = array($car, $suv, $truck);

foreach ($vehicles as $vehicle) {
    GasStation::cleanVehicle($vehicle);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is also not a bad approach to have each object 'do its own work'... here is the issue I have with that... if we have 100 cars all with byte code to fill gas... thats 100x the byte code, rather than one 'singleton-like' method on the GasStation class... Traits I have not looked into enough. – Reshape Media Apr 19 '12 at 6:33
1  
@ReshapeMedia: Care must be taken to not break encapsulation for optimization at this layer. If performance becomes an issue we could always introduce an op code caching mechanism to speed things up. – Mike Purcell Apr 19 '12 at 15:01
    
Good points on using abstract and interface methods to streamline the execution of the objects. – Reshape Media Apr 19 '12 at 17:43

You cannot cast your own classes, you need to instantiate a new class, with omitting the variables.

You have really weird, inconsistent way of defining it. Why would you create a global function who would fill/tank it? This should be a method of the class itself, don't give a away the handling. Instead use an abstract class like

class FillingStation
{
   protected $vehicles = array();

   public function addVehicle(Vehicle $vehicle) {
      $this->vehicles[] = $vehicle;
   }

   public function fillTanks() {
     foreach($this->vehicles as $vehicle) {
        $vehicle->fillTank();
     }
   }
}

Now you define your abstract class, from which every car will derive

abstract class Vehicle
{
  public $fillLevel = 0;

  abstract public function fillTank();
}

And the specific types

class Car extends Vehicle
{
  public function fillTank()
  {
     // ... do some stuff here, e.g.:
     $this->fillLevel = 100;
  }
}

class SportsCar extends Vehicle
{
  // ....

Now glueing all together:

$parkingLot = new FillingStation();
$parkingLot->addVehicle(new Car());
$parkingLot->addVehicle(new SportsCar());

$parkingLot->fillTanks();

This should serve as a suggestion, of course you would need to change it a bit to fullfil your needs, but I hope the point I try to make is clear.

share|improve this answer
    
Good suggestion, although I would have made fillTank and attribute of a vehicle. – Mike Purcell Apr 18 '12 at 21:14
    
You're completely right, makes much more sense of course. I edited this part, thanks for mentioning :) – Dan Lee Apr 18 '12 at 21:18
    
I overthought it a bit and saw some mistakes. I think now it makes more sense. – Dan Lee Apr 18 '12 at 21:32
    
Semantically, what does a parking lot have to do with filling a vehicle's gas tank? – Mike Purcell Apr 18 '12 at 21:40
    
Hm, right that sounds wrong. I will rename it... GasStation looks ugly so I chose FillingStation – Dan Lee Apr 18 '12 at 21:42

use instanceof or is_a to determine an objects class or interface.

However, the pumpAndPay method, and therefore its class, are tightly coupled to the car classes. You should create another interface that the class can check for (using the two methods I listed). Remember that interfaces can be extended, e.g.:

interface IPaygas
{
    private tank1;
    public function payGas($amount);
}

interface IPaygasMultiTank extends IPaygas
{
    private tank2;
}
share|improve this answer
    
instanceof and is_a are often code smells. there is usually always a better solution than checking an object's class. – dqhendricks Apr 18 '12 at 20:40
    
@dqhendricks: Agreed. But I'm suggesting he use it to check the interface (and that they can be extended). – webbiedave Apr 18 '12 at 20:44
    
@webbiedave I thought of this too to add multiple interfaces but the problem then becomes on the method receiving the object, it can still only take a variable of one type. But good idea all the same. – Reshape Media Apr 19 '12 at 6:05
    
Please view my update above – Reshape Media Apr 19 '12 at 6:31

Your mistake is here:

fillTank($car,(sportscar) $car->tank1);

Pretty much all of your classes properties should be protected or private. Basically one class should not be performing operations on another class's properties. Instead the car should be handling its own internals, while PumpAndPay only operates a fillTank method of the car.

   function pumpAndPay(iPayGas $car){
       $amount = $car->fillTank();
       $car->payGas($amount);
   }

   interface ipaygas{

       function payGas($amount);
       function fillTank($amount);
   }
share|improve this answer
    
Similar to Mike Purcell's answer of having each object 'do its own work'... see above – Reshape Media Apr 19 '12 at 6:34

All you have to do is do is this:

if($val instanceof whatever.class){
  $val->dostuff();
}
share|improve this answer

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