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What's the best way to clear/reset all regex matching variables?

  • Example how $1 isn't reset between regex operations and uses the most recent match:

    $_="this is the man that made the new year rumble"; 
    / (is) /; 
    / (isnt) /; 
    say $1;          # outputs "is"
    
  • Example how this may be problematic when working with loops:

    foreach (...){
       /($some_value)/;
       &doSomething($1) if $1;
    }
    

Update: I didn't think I'd need to do this, but Example-2 is only an example. This question is about resetting matching variables, not the best way to implement them.

Regardless, originally my coding style was more inline with being explicit and using if-blocks. After coming back to this (Example2) now, it is much more concise in reading many lines of code, I'd find this syntax faster to comprehend.

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7  
This question is also "If I have to shoot myself, what should I aim for?" –  brian d foy Apr 18 '12 at 21:45
    
@briandfoy: exactly :) - saw the sched for oscon, looking forward to seeing your pres. again. I think people are thinking I don't understand what an if (//) does and why it should be used. Often, when I'm on here it's because someone else didn't and I'm looking for the easiest way out of their code. In this case, my answer is the only one that answers the question I asked. Correction: mine and ikegami. –  vol7ron Apr 18 '12 at 23:51
1  
Then why don't you ask it that way? Explanation of the circumstances make stupid questions into good questions sometimes. –  matthias krull Apr 19 '12 at 0:04
    
@mugenkenichi: I think I was pressed for time, but yeah you're probably right ;) –  vol7ron Apr 19 '12 at 4:05
1  
You can still edit your question to explain why you are asking it. But, if you are pressed for time, why would you post a speculative question at all? Shouldn't you have been doing other things than wasting other people's time? You seemed to have plenty of time to comment on other people's answers. –  brian d foy Apr 19 '12 at 10:47
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6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Regex captures* are reset by a successful match. To reset regex captures, one would use a trivial match operation that's guaranteed to match.

"a" =~ /a/;  # Reset captures to undef.

Yeah, it looks weird, but you asked to do some thing weird.

If you fix your code, you don't need weird looking workarounds. Fixing your code even reveals a bug!

$_ = "this is the man that made the new year rumble"; 
if (/ (is) / || / (isnt) /) {
   say $1; 
} else{ 
   ...  # You're currently printing something random.
}

for (...) {
   if (/($some_pattern)/) {
      do_something($1);
   }
}

* — Backrefs are regex patterns that match previously captured text. e.g. \1, \k<foo>. You're actually talking about "regex capture buffers".

share|improve this answer
    
I'd give you double points for correcting me, if I could. Though, the docs call it "matching variables" ;) –  vol7ron Apr 18 '12 at 23:55
    
The only place I see "matching variables" is in perlrequick and perlretut. –  brian d foy Apr 19 '12 at 10:46
    
@brian d foy, I see "match variables" it in perlre (which makes more sense than "matching variables"), but I really dislike the term. It's ambiguous if not meaningless. "Capture buffer" is use prominently in the documentation (at least in perlre and perlvar). $1 technically only "allows access to a capture buffer" rather than being a capture buffer itself, but that's hair splitting. –  ikegami Apr 19 '12 at 18:44
    
Not all match variables are capture buffers though. –  brian d foy Apr 25 '12 at 16:27
    
@brian d foy, Meaning what? The docs say \1 and k<name> access capture buffers, so both named and numbered captures are documented to access capture buffers. What does that leave? –  ikegami Apr 25 '12 at 16:37
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You should use the return from the match, not the state of the group vars.

foreach (...) {
    doSomething($1) if /($some_value)/;
}

$1, etc. are only guaranteed to reflect the most recent match if the match succeeds. You shouldn't be looking at them other than right after a successful match.

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12  
The larger point is that you shouldn't be doing anything that relies on resetting the backreference. This was an example of how to avoid that reliance in the code you posted; if you have a different example, please post it so we can demonstrate how to avoid it there. Relying on the content of $1 in any context other than immediately after a successful match is a bug. Period. –  Mark Reed Apr 18 '12 at 20:54
3  
@vol7ron No. This is exactly on spot and documented behaviour. perlvar –  matthias krull Apr 18 '12 at 20:55
5  
perlre specifically states "Failed matches in Perl do not reset the match variables, which makes it easier to write code that tests for a series of more specific cases and remembers the best match." –  JRFerguson Apr 18 '12 at 21:05
2  
@vol7ron: Fair enough. In your situation I would still look for other relatively low-impact refactoring opportunities that didn't involve this sort of hack, but if you're determined to go that route... I don't suppose there's a scope difference, in which case you could declare $1 as local? Failing that, I think your own solution is the only option. –  Mark Reed Apr 18 '12 at 21:08
2  
...or maybe you could not use $1 etc. at all, but assign the result of the match to a lexical var instead. If you do my @a = /.../, then $a[1] will be undef if the match fails. –  Mark Reed Apr 18 '12 at 21:12
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You should test whether the match succeeded. For example:

foreach (...){
   /($some_value)/ or next;
   doSomething($1) if $1;
}

foreach (...){
   doSomething($1) if /($some_value)/ and $1;
}

foreach (...){
   if (/($some_value)/) {
      doSomething($1) if $1;
   }
}

Depending on what $some_value is, and how you want to handle matching the empty string and/or 0, you may or may not need to test $1 at all.

share|improve this answer
    
You're missing the point. It was an example (only partial code). The question is about resetting the backreference. –  vol7ron Apr 18 '12 at 20:48
3  
@vol7ron you're missing the point. Stop reading the values of global variables when they're not valid. –  hobbs Apr 18 '12 at 20:52
    
@hobbs: :) no. You, of all people, should know when code gets more complex you structure it differently to make it more understandable. The whole reason why you sometimes do if () {...} vs do {...} if () –  vol7ron Apr 18 '12 at 20:57
3  
@vol7ron and when code gets more complex, you do everything you possibly can to avoid action at a distance, like using a $1 that may or may not have been set at some time in the past. –  hobbs Apr 18 '12 at 20:59
2  
You can restructure code to make it more readable only in ways that don't break the code. Relying on the value of $1 when you didn't just have a successful match breaks the code. You should take this as a sign that, whatever you're trying to do, you need to do it differently. –  Mark Reed Apr 18 '12 at 20:59
add comment

You shoud do it this way:

foreach (...) { 
   someFnc($1) if /.../; 
}

But if you want to stick with your style, then check this as an idea:

$_ = "this is the man that made the new year rumble";  

$m = /(is)/   ? $1 : undef;
$m = /(isnt)/ ? $1 : undef;

print $m, "\n" if defined $m;
share|improve this answer
2  
Thats dirty.. in that there are more ideomatic ways to deal with this problem. –  matthias krull Apr 18 '12 at 20:58
    
@mugenkenichi - I agree, it is, but if OP likes that style, then... –  Ωmega Apr 18 '12 at 21:01
1  
$& should be avoided at all costs. In your example $1 would have the exact same data and avoid a global performance penalty. –  Ven'Tatsu Apr 18 '12 at 21:44
    
@Ven'Tatsu - Certainly we all know that $& is last match, so in this case it is $1, but can you please explain what peformance penalty you are talking about? –  Ωmega Apr 18 '12 at 21:54
2  
Read the perlvar entry on $& to see about the performance widely-known and generally-avoided performance penalty. –  brian d foy Apr 18 '12 at 23:23
show 1 more comment

Assigning captures to a list behave closer to what it sounds like you want.

for ("match", "fail") {
    my ($fake_1) = /(m.+)/;
    doSomething($fake_1) if $fake_1;
}
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add comment

I'm guessing one possible way would be to match anything either at the end of the loop, or before the regex:

foreach (...){
   /($some_value)/;
   &doSomething($1) if $1;
   /.?/;                      # should match and reset backreferences
}

I used at the end for when the loop is over, $1 won't be troublesome elsewhere.

share|improve this answer
    
Would like someone to know why this was downrated –  vol7ron Apr 18 '12 at 20:49
5  
I'm not the one who downvoted it, but see my answer above. It was probably downvoted because it's a hack that encourages bad design. –  Mark Reed Apr 18 '12 at 20:55
1  
@stackoverflow: glad to see you again :) I think people are confused about my intentions. I understand how to write an if statement and only use the match if its found, I'm working with code that I don't want to rewrite (a bunch of if-statements and function calls based on the last match), so the easiest way here is to get at $1, or reset $1. My question was specific and purposeful, but it seems like users here want to disregard what I was asking and get at what I was trying to ask, like I was a first-year programmer. –  vol7ron Apr 18 '12 at 23:43
1  
Then safer solution would be /.?/, just in case :) –  Ωmega Apr 19 '12 at 0:06
1  
This does answer the question. I disagree with the downvotes. The people who downvoted should have expressed their anger at the question rather than at the answer. –  Joseph Myers Aug 8 '13 at 1:56
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