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Ever since I added a css transition (first one was on hover, second was an animation) it seems to have messed up my fonts, they look 'different'.

It's totally bizarre, I've looked for hours and can't find anything on it, nor can I figure out exactly why it's happening.

It seems to be ok in firefox, but safari and chrome are having problems.

http://www.simplerweb.co.uk

Everything below the gear animation at the bottom left seems to look like a lighter font weight and the navigation menu seems to look the same.

I am totally lost on this one.

Here's the CSS for the animation.

.gearone {height:100px;
width:100px;
top:-10px;
left:-10px;
position:absolute;
background-position:center;
background-repeat:no-repeat;
background-image:url(../images/gearone.png);
 -webkit-animation-name:             backrotate; 
    -webkit-animation-duration:        13s; 
    -webkit-animation-iteration-count:  infinite;
    -webkit-transition-timing-function:linear;


-moz-animation-name: backrotate;
     -moz-animation-duration: 13s;
      -moz-animation-timing-function: linear;
    -moz-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
}

.geartwo {height:100px;
width:100px;
position:absolute;
background-position:center;
background-repeat:no-repeat;
background-image:url(../images/gearone.png);
top:20px;
left:10px;

 -webkit-animation-name:             rotate; 
    -webkit-animation-duration:         13s; 
    -webkit-animation-iteration-count:  infinite;
    -webkit-transition-timing-function:linear;


    -moz-animation-name: rotate;
     -moz-animation-duration: 13s;
      -moz-animation-timing-function:linear;
    -moz-animation-iteration-count: infinite;

}


@-webkit-keyframes rotate {
  from {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg);

  }
  to { 
    -webkit-transform: rotate(360deg);

  }
}

@-moz-keyframes rotate {
from {

    -moz-transform: rotate(0deg);
  }
  to { 

    -moz-transform: rotate(360deg);
  }
}



@-webkit-keyframes backrotate {
    0% {

        -webkit-transform: rotate(360deg);
    }
    100% {

        -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg);
    }
}
@-moz-keyframes backrotate {
    0% {
        -moz-transform: rotate(360deg);

    }
    100% {
        -moz-transform: rotate(0deg);

    }
}
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No one has any ideas? –  andy Apr 18 '12 at 23:53

7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What you're seeing is webkit anti-alias your text because it's treating it as a texture as opposed to a vector. There's not much you can do, other than not using transformations, or using an text replacement to provide an image instead of your type.

There's a few related threads regarding webkit aliasing, but I haven't personally had much luck keeping the type as type, and still using transformations.

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sidenote: compliant, not complient :) –  djlumley Apr 19 '12 at 2:08
2  
I fixed it by adding -webkit-font-smoothing: subpixel-antialiased; to the parents of any elements that were having the issue. –  andy Apr 19 '12 at 11:35

I think I had a similar issue, and what fixed it for me was adding

-webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased;

to my body css. When animation of any kind happens, webkit tries to antialias the text to help with the animation, so adding it to begin with prevents it from changing or looking different.

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i had the same problem. wile the execution of a webkit transition some anchor text became antialiased. after many tries i've found that this happen just in elements that are positioned and have z-index with inside other elements positioned too and with z-index.

#footer {
    bottom: 0;
    left: 330px;
    right: 100px;
    height: 75px;
    background-color: #231f20;
    min-width: 540px;
    min-height: 75px;
    position: fixed;
    z-index: 10;
}

inside the footer i have

#cityNav > ul > li a {
            font-size: 24px;
            text-transform: uppercase;
            position: relative;
            z-index: 110;
            line-height: 24px;
            height: 24px;
            display: block;
        }

and this is my transition

.circle {
        position: absolute;
        top: 0;
        left: 0;
        display: block;
        background-color: #ff0000;
        width: 20px;
        height: 20px;
        cursor: pointer;
        text-indent: -999em;
        -webkit-border-radius: 50%;
        -moz-border-radius: 50%;
        -o-border-radius: 50%;
        border-radius: 50%;
        -webkit-transition: all .2s ease-out; 
        -moz-transition: all .2s ease-out; 
        -o-transition: all .2s ease-out; 
        transition: all .2s ease-out;
    }
    .circle:hover {
        -webkit-transform: scale(2);
        -moz-transform: scale(2);
        -o-transform: scale(2);
        transform: scale(2);
    }
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I'm not exactly sure of the reason why it's happening, but it looks like when your .geartwo element (100px x 100px) overlaps your text, it seems to lighten it. When it rolls off of it, it's back to normal. I too, notice this only in webkit browsers.

To fix it, you can set the gear width and height to 40px (that's the size of the image anyway -- I don't see the need for it to be 100px x 100px), and then re-position it accordingly.

EDIT: I'm not sure that you need to do this after my proposition, but I found this related discussion after a bit of searching.

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+1 for noticing the gears. The overlap is probably what is causing the font anti-alising in that case. –  djlumley Apr 19 '12 at 2:10

I've faced this issue numerous times and have had success adding the following css to the animated element:

z-index: 60000;
position: relative;

It seems it needs both z-index and position to be effective. In my case I was using it with Font Awesome animated spinners.

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As stated above, -webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased; works on desktop Safari. But on iOS, you need to use -webkit-backface-visibility: hidden; in order to fix this.

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Exactly this resolved the font weirdness for us in Chrome 40. There was another flawed fix with transform: translateZ(0) but it kept breaking position: fixed so it was a no-go. Thanks man backface-visibility: hidden did the job! –  Rygu Nov 21 at 10:51

I was having this issue in Chrome for OSX. Using -webkit-backface-visibility: hidden; fixed the problem.

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