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Are there any modern browsers that won't detect the favicon.ico automatically? Is there any reason to add the link tag for favicon.ico?

<link rel="shortcut icon" href="/favicon.ico">

My guess is that it's only necessary to include it in the HTML document if you decide to go with GIF or PNG...

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I've never seen that any browser had needed it. Do you have any examples? – shark555 Apr 18 '12 at 21:21
    
I can name some browsers that have preference settings whether or not to go look for favicon.ico automatically. So if you want to be sure that your icon shows up, better include a link in your HTML. By the way, .png files are usually smaller than comparable .ico files. – Mr Lister Apr 18 '12 at 21:26
    
Please name some Mr Lister :) No shark555, I can't name any... – user1087110 Apr 18 '12 at 21:27
3  
Firefox (and other Gecko based browsers like SeaMonkey) has several settings to fine-tune its behaviour. browser.chrome.favicons set to true will look for favicon.ico in the root; if false, it will only load an icons if specified in the HTML page. See kb.mozillazine.org/Browser.chrome.favicons and related pages. – Mr Lister Apr 19 '12 at 7:01
up vote 113 down vote accepted

To choose a different location or file type (e.g. PNG) for the favicon:
One reason can be that you want to have the icon in a specific location, perhaps in the images folder or something alike. For example:

<link rel="icon" href="_/img/favicon.png">

This diferent location may even be a CDN, just like SO seems to do with <link rel="shortcut icon" href="http://cdn.sstatic.net/stackoverflow/img/favicon.ico">.

To learn more about using other file types like PNG check out this question.

For cache busting purposes:
@Florian mentions in the comments yet another reason: to add a query string to the path for cache-busting purposes:

<link rel="icon" href="/favicon.ico?v=1.1"> 

Favicons are very heavily cached and this a great way to ensure a refresh.


This only answers the second part of your question. As far as the first bit: I'm not aware of any modern browser not detecting one at the default location, no. But someone may perhaps correct me on that.


Footnote: as indicated by @Semanino's answer, using rel="shortcut icon" is an old technique which was required by older versions of Internet Explorer, but in most cases can be replaced by the more correct rel="icon" instruction. The article @Semanino based this on properly links to the appropriate spec which shows a rel value of shortcut isn't a valid option.

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Should this go in the <head> tag? – Max Williams Apr 13 at 8:20
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@MaxWilliams Yes. (See "Permitted parent elements" in the MDN docs or "Contexts" in the W3 spec). – Jeroen Apr 13 at 8:24

Please note that both the HTML5 specification of W3C and WhatWG standardize

<link rel="icon" href="/favicon.ico">

Note the value of the "rel" attribute!

The value shortcut icon for the rel attribute is a very old Internet Explorer specific extension and deprecated.

So please consider not using it any more and updating your files so they are standards compliant and are displayed correctly in all browsers.

You might also want to take a look at this great post: rel="shortcut icon" considered harmful

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The bottom line is not all browsers will actually look for your favicon.ico file. Some browsers allow users to choose whether or not it should automatically look. Therefore, in order to ensure that it will always appear and get looked at, you do have to define it.

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Thanks for your comment animuson. Can you name some browsers that wont look automaticly? – user1087110 Apr 18 '12 at 21:39
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@user1087110: I don't know any off the top of my head, and honestly who cares. The point is you can't assume it will and you need to account for those that won't. – animuson Apr 18 '12 at 21:43

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