Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to get column information in C# from a SQL table on SQL Server. I am following the example in this link: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310107 My program strangely gets hung up when it tries to close the connection. If the connection is not closed, the program exits without any Exceptions. Here's my code:

SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(@"MyConnectionString"); 
connection.Open();
SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM MyTable", connection);
SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.KeyInfo); // If this is changed to CommandBehavior.SchemaOnly, the program runs fast.
DataTable table = reader.GetSchemaTable();
Console.WriteLine(table.Rows.Count);
connection.Close(); // Alternatively If this line is commented out, the program runs fast.

Putting the SqlConnection inside a using block also causes the application to hang unless CommandBehavior.KeyInfo is changed to CommandBehavior.SchemaOnly.

using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(@"MyConnectionString"))
{
    connection.Open();
    SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM MyTable", connection);
    SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.KeyInfo); // If this is changed to CommandBehavior.SchemaOnly, the program runs fast even here in the using
    DataTable table = reader.GetSchemaTable();
    Console.WriteLine(table.Rows.Count);
}

The table in question has over 3 million rows, but since I am only obtaining the Schema information, I would think this wouldn't be an issue. My question is: Why does my application get stuck while trying to close a connection?

SOLUTION: Maybe this isn't optimal, but it does work; I inserted a command.Cancel(); statement right before Close is called on connection:

SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(@"MyConnectionString"); 
connection.Open();
SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM MyTable", connection);
SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.KeyInfo); // If this is changed to CommandBehavior.SchemaOnly, the program runs fast.
DataTable table = reader.GetSchemaTable();
Console.WriteLine(table.Rows.Count);
command.Cancel(); // <-- This is it.
connection.Close(); // Alternatively If this line is commented out, the program runs fast.
share|improve this question
    
Can you share the connecting string (excluding sensitive details lilke user name, password, server and database,) just wnat to see if you are setting any other variable which might make the closing process long. –  Beenish Khan Apr 18 '12 at 21:28
    
Sure. Here it is: @" Data Source=****; Initial Catalog=****; User Id=****; Password=****; Connect Timeout=60;" –  Words Like Jared Apr 18 '12 at 21:30
    
Shouldn't you close the reader first ? –  Deb Apr 18 '12 at 21:32
    
3 million rows in a Select * from MyTable? Are you sure that is not the cause? I will try to put a WHERE 1=0 (as I have already said) to see if it make any difference –  Steve Apr 18 '12 at 21:34
    
Steve, I suspect that 3 million rows thing may somehow be the cause. I'm just testing this out right now. In my application I will have to parse the statement dynamically (since they will be determined at runtime) to find where to place the WHERE 1 = 0 if there are already other clauses (i.e. HAVING, etc.). Aliasing the select using something like: SELECT * FROM (...) S WHERE 1 = 0 will throw an error, I believe, if there are multiple columns of the same name in the parenthesized select (i.e. due to joining and/or aliasing). –  Words Like Jared Apr 18 '12 at 21:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I saw something like this, long ago. For me, it was because I did something like:

SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM MyTable", connection);
SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();

// here, I started looping, reading one record at a time
// and after reading, say, 100 records, I'd break out of the loop

connection.Close();  // this would hang

The problem is that the command appears to want to complete. That is, go through the entire result set. And my result set had millions of records. It would finish ... eventually.

I solved the problem by adding a call to command.Cancel() before calling connection.Close().

See http://www.informit.com/guides/content.aspx?g=dotnet&seqNum=610 for more information.

share|improve this answer
    
This sounds promising. I'll try it when I get to work; thanks! –  Words Like Jared Apr 19 '12 at 12:06

It looks right to me overall and I think you need a little optimization. In addition to the above suggestion regarding avoiding DataReader, I will recommend to use connection pooling. You can get the details from here :

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/take-advantage-of-adonet-connection-pooling/6107854

share|improve this answer

Could you try this?

DataTable dt = new DataTable(); 
using(SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("yourConnectionString"))
{
    SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("SET FMTONLY ON; " + yourQueryString + "; SET FMTONLY OFF;",conn);  
    conn.Open(); 
    dt.Load(cmd.ExecuteReader()); 
}

SET FMTONLY ON/OFF from MSDN seems the way to go

share|improve this answer
    
I would go with the SET FMTONLY ON except that MSDN says Do not use this feature in conjunction with SQL Server 2012 (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173839%28v=sql.110%29.aspx). While my application will be interfacing with SQL Server 2008 for the time being, I would want it future-proofed since we will probably migrate in the near future. –  Words Like Jared Apr 18 '12 at 21:52
    
From what I can read here Deprecated Feature in SqlServer 2012 SET FMTONLY is still supported AND will be removed in a future version of SQLServer That means SQLServer 2014? probably will still have this statement. –  Steve Apr 18 '12 at 21:57
    
CommandBehavior.SchemaOnly prefixes a query with SET FMTONLY ON. I don't know if this value is dependent on SQL version or not. I.e. if FMTONLY is deprecated in a future version, would .NET detect it via the connection/connection string and perform a different operation appropriate to the version? –  ulty4life Apr 19 '12 at 1:41
    
@ulty4life: Yes, that is exactly what I was wondering; whether or .NET would be smart enough to use the newer version. I don't have access to a 2012 database, though. If you could find that out, that would be great! Thanks :) –  Words Like Jared Apr 19 '12 at 12:08
    
You can always condition the procdeure to use checking for SQL Server version with SELECT @@Version. VS uses SET FMTONLY ON/OFF for guetting schema in some occasions (i.e. TableAdapters). If you trace SQL Server you'll see it. Other option is to use SELECT TOP 0 ... –  JotaBe Apr 19 '12 at 12:24

There is an specific way to do this, using SMO (SQL Server management objects)

You can get the collection of tables in the database, and then read the properties of the table you're interested in (columns, keys, and all imaginable properties)

This is what SSMS uses to get and set properties of all database objects.

Look at this references:

This is a full example of how to get table properties:

This will allow you to get all the possible information from the database in a very easy way. there are plenty of samples in VB.NET and C#.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess I didn't specify clearly in my question, but I am interested in finding out column information of queries which may contain aggregate computations in the select list. Therefore table information is insufficient and probably way more trouble than the limited benefit it will give in my case. –  Words Like Jared Apr 19 '12 at 12:09

I would try something like this. This ensures all items are cleaned up - and avoids using DataReader. You don't need this unless you have unusually large amounts of data that would cause memory issues.

  public void DoWork(string connectionstring)
    {
        DataTable dt = new DataTable("MyData");
        using (var connection = new SqlConnection(connectionstring))
        {
            connection.Open();
            string commandtext = "SELECT * FROM MyTable";

            using(var adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(commandtext, connection))
            {
                adapter.Fill(dt);
            }
            connection.Close();
        }
        Console.WriteLine(dt.Rows.Count);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Basically I have some analytical SQL queries with aggregates and such. I need to quickly determine the column name and types of the returned values; it looks like in your code I am getting the entire result set. This is unacceptable in my case as some of my queries may return millions of rows; I am only interested in the column metadata. –  Words Like Jared Apr 19 '12 at 12:06
    
You need to put your own query in there. Try using information schema. select * from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS where TABLE_NAME like 'mytable' –  tsells Apr 19 '12 at 16:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.