Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First off, I want to say there is no use case for this. The only thing I am trying to do is explore if this is possible.

What I am trying to do is "rebrand" the return signature of a method in the base interface to that of a child interface.

The goal: declare and implement a method once, but vary the return type to match subinterfaces. I have figured out how to achieve this in some cases, but it breaks down in certain situations.

Imagine if I have base interface B and it has a method B doWork(). Also, there is an implementation of B that implements doWork(). Due to the nature of doWork(), this implementation should be the only one that exists.

Now, this is pretty easy to do with Generics. For the above example:

interface B<T extends B> {
    T doWork();
}

class BImpl<T extends B> implements B<T> {
    @Override
    public T doWork() { return something; }
}

And the child interface/impl would look like this maybe:

interface C extends B<C> {
    void somethingCSpecific();
}

class CImpl extends BImpl<C> implements C {
    @Override
    public void somethingCSpecific() {   }
}

Anyone constructing CImpl would see that doWork() returns a C.

C obj = new CImpl().doWork()  // The money shot.  No casting needed.

And here is where it breaks down... Imagine B now looks like this:

public interface B<T extends B> {
    T thisOrThat(T that);
    boolean something();
}

And I want to do this in BImpl:

class BImpl<T extends B> implements B<T> {
    @Override
    public T thisOrThat(T that) {
        if (that.something())
            return that;
        return this;  //  Error!!  _this_ might be a different T than _that_.
    }
    @Override
    public boolean something()  { return whatever; }
}

Note where the error happens.

Obviously, this can't work without an unsafe and dubious cast. But if I knew that the implementation of this in the above thisOrThat method was the same as the implementation of that, everything would be ok.

So, to my question. Is there a way to restrict this and that to the same type, without knowing that type a priori?

Or maybe is there a different way to go about doing this, but having the same result? Namely only having to declare AND implement thisOrThat() just once, yet have the return type adapt to the subinterface?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Make your class BImpl abstract and add a view method to it which is implemented by the specific classes extending your abstract base class:

public abstract class BImpl<T extends B<T>> implements B<T> {
   @Override
   public T thisOrThat(T that) {
       if (that.something())
           return that;
       return this.asT();
   }


    @Override
    public boolean something() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return false;
    }

    protected abstract T asT();
}

Every of your classes still needs to implement T asT() then, but this is simple and compiles without warning:

public class C extends BImpl<C> implements B<C> {
    @Override
    protected C asT() {
        return this;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works perfectly. In fact, BImpl doesn't need that extra <T extends B<T>>, it works fine as <T extends B>. –  marathon Apr 18 '12 at 23:56
    
Actually, now I see why it needs <T extends B<T>>. –  marathon Apr 19 '12 at 0:12
    
Just for the record - it needs <T extends B<T>> because without the <T> the compiler produces a warning about the raw usage of B. –  Michael Schmeißer Apr 19 '12 at 10:22

If I understand your problem correctly, then the way to solve it is with a sort of self-referential generic: B<T extends B<T>>.

I think what you want is class BImpl implements B<BImpl>, in which case everything type checks normally.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe I'm not quite following everything, but this makes thisOrThat's argument type in BImpl not compatible with subinterface C in CImpl. –  marathon Apr 19 '12 at 0:01
    
It'd help if the code you provided was more organized, but I think that's necessary for type safety in general. If this is supposed to have the same type as that, then there's really not much alternative. –  Louis Wasserman Apr 19 '12 at 1:21
    
Not sure how you want the code "more organized". There are two simple interfaces and two simple implementations of those interfaces. Your solution does not work due to the fact it crystallizes BImpl.thisOrThat into concrete types. I tried it. But I gave you an upvote anyway for taking a stab at it. Thank you. –  marathon Apr 19 '12 at 2:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.