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I'm defining a javascript "object" via the following function:

function Window(vars) {
    this.div = $("<div/>", {
        id: vars.id,
        class: vars.styles + " box text",
        css: {
            top: vars.top,
            left: vars.left
        }
    });
    this.div.appendTo( $("body") );
    // more stuff happens..

As you can see, the Window has a div property, which is a jQuery object. In it's instantiation, I declare the CSS classes box and text. text is not important, it's just font stuff. Here's the CSS for box, however.

.box {
 z-index: 1;
 position: absolute;
 background: #222222;
 min-width: 10%;
 text-align: center;
 padding: 5px;
}
.nav-extension {
 z-index: 3;
 padding: 8px;
 background: #000000;
 position: absolute;
 -moz-border-radius-bottomright: 5px;
 -moz-border-radius-topright: 5px;
 border-bottom-right-radius: 5px;
 border-top-right-radius: 5px;
}

box is absolute at z-index 1, and another div with nav-extension is somewhere else on the page, also absolute and at z-index 3. However, when I add the Window object to my page, it appears above anything with nav-extension. All other CSS attribues, like background, still work.

I've tried altering the z-index where I instantiate the div in the "css" section I'm already using, but that didn't work either. What gives?

Edit

Also, I've inspected both the div with box and the one with nav-extension with Firefox, and the "Style" tab indicates they still have their intended z-index (not overridden).

#2: Changed vars.class to vars.styles.

share|improve this question
1  
Show us, please. –  David Thomas Apr 18 '12 at 22:39
2  
You should not be using an identifier or property named class as that is a reserved word in javascript. A CSS class name uses the property named obj.className. –  jfriend00 Apr 18 '12 at 22:41
2  
Window? That is a bad function name. –  epascarello Apr 18 '12 at 22:41
1  
@epascarello I disagree. var dialogBox = new Window({...}); looks fine to me. –  alpha123 Apr 18 '12 at 22:46
    
Changed the vars.class part. I could make a jsfiddle, but there's heavy PHP and multiple libraries at work here.. I might be able to strip it down. –  Snailer Apr 18 '12 at 22:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Could you give us some DOM, please? It appears that that your box and the nav-extension-div are in different contexts. A non-static position sets up a new context, relatively to which all z-indexes inside are processed. A simple fiddle to demonstrate: http://jsfiddle.net/3KTyz/

<body>
    <style>
        .box { z-index:1; }
        .nav-extension { z-index:3; }
    </style>
    ...
        <div id="context" style="position:relative"><!-- or absolute or fixed -->
             ...
                 <div class="nav-extension"><!--
                 will be positioned +3 relatively to other elements in #context
                 -->...</div>
        </div>
    <div class="box"><!--
    will be above #context, which has (implicit) z-index:0
    -->...</div>
</body>

To make nav-extension appear above the box, you will either

  • set #context (or one of its parents) to a z-index higher than the one of box or
  • move the nav-extension-div outside any context
share|improve this answer
    
You were right, I had a div wrapping the entire page, but when the code added a Window, it appended it to the body, not within the wrapper! –  Snailer Apr 19 '12 at 21:18

class is a reserved word in JavaScript and cannot be used as a property or a variable name, maybe this is the culprit.

share|improve this answer
2  
Modern browsers allow reserved words as object properties. He should still change it for older browsers, but this won't cause anything wrong in new browsers. –  alpha123 Apr 18 '12 at 22:45

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