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I'm not sure how to start... I'm not sure why ActiveSupport::TimeZone is even necessary, since TZInfo::Timezone seems to work just fine, and be more complete... but we had been using ActiveSupport for some reason, and I was unable to find the EST timezone in the available timezones. Am I missing something? Is there any reason that's not included?

Is there any reason not to use TZInfo? Should everyone just be using TZInfo?

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I'm also curious about this issue; i maintain some applications that utilize both ActiveSupport::TimeZone and TZInfo::Timezone to frustrating effects. Trying to figure out the best way to move forward, hopefully with just one or the other. –  ilasno May 5 '12 at 20:42
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

The TimeZone class serves as a wrapper around TZInfo::Timezone instances. It allows Rails to do the following:

  • Limit the set of zones provided by TZInfo to a meaningful subset of 142 zones
  • Retrieve and display zones with a friendlier name (e.g., “Eastern Time (US & Canada)” instead of “America/New_York”)
  • Lazily load TZInfo::Timezone instances only when they’re needed
  • Create ActiveSupport::TimeWithZone instances via TimeZone’s local, parse, at and now methods.

Source: The Rails 3 Way - 2nd Edition

EST is provided for in ActiveSupport::TimeZone, it's named "Eastern Time (US & Canada)". You can see all the time zones provided by ActiveSupport::TimeZone by calling TimeZone.all (provided ActiveSupport is included). EST is also included in US time zones, you can return a smaller collection of US-only time zones by calling TimeZone.us_zones. Accessing the TimeZone collection will provide a TimeZone preceded by it's offset eg. TimeZone("Eastern Time (US & Canada)"] => (GMT-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada).

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I don't know why I couldn't find EST... it seems to be there now. Perhaps it was an old version? I don't know. Thanks for the clarification on the two classes! :) –  mltsy Nov 29 '12 at 21:02
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